Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    16

    Replacing Chains

    Quick question for you guys. I have always changed out my chains on the bikes every season just because the LBS recommended it for the spring maintainace. Anyways is this really necessary to do or is it just something that should be done when you start noticing the chain stretching or wearing out. Also how does this effect how well the chain meshes with the cog?

  2. #2
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,685
    Quote Originally Posted by Albino84
    Quick question for you guys. I have always changed out my chains on the bikes every season just because the LBS recommended it for the spring maintainace. Anyways is this really necessary to do or is it just something that should be done when you start noticing the chain stretching or wearing out. Also how does this effect how well the chain meshes with the cog?

    Hi Al
    there are special tools to measure your chain to see if its stretched or not, if you clean & lube it often (like every ride) and don't ride in mud too much it should be ok for more than 1 season(depending on mileage) if your gears are getting hook shaped replace them & your chain

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,659
    You don't need any special tools to measure chain stretch. They're 12" from the center of one link to one 12" from it. If it measures more than 1/16" greater than 12" then you likely should replace the chain. If it's 1/8" or greater then you might want to think about replacing the chain/cassette and rings. Kept properly cleaned and lubed a chain can last quite a while.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    16
    Sounds good thanks for the quick replies!

  5. #5
    Devo
    Reputation: SelfPropelledDevo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,617

    pin wear

    chains dont actually "stretch". the pins start to wear. basically material is worn away from the pins, so cumualtivly it seems that the entire chain has "stretched". if you clean your bike regularly, a trick I've done for a long time, is to simply reverse the direction of your chain every time you clean it. I like to use SRAM or wipperman, cuz of the quick link, and i use a park chain scrubber with bio degreaser, run Pedros Super X chain lube, and the whole process is super quick.
    this practice can help reduce "cumulative wear" on the entire drive train. however...being that now those pins are being worn on both sides...well...i suppose its 2xdouble dangerous to break a pin, and we all know what that feels like when a chain staps. Doooohhhh!
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  6. #6
    Carpe Noctem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    311
    I think Devo is on the right path but I have pulled apart many severely worn chains and I've never seen a pin worn in a visible way. I do however see the rollers wear on both the outside against the ring and cog and on the inside against the pin.
    Off season? What off season?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    728
    Is there a way to measure the cogs to see if they are worn? No visible hook has developed in the teeth.

    I recently changed my chain but not the cassette and I noticed it now has the tendancy to overshift a bit then fall to the right cog when I downshift. I suspect the cassette needs replacement?

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,000
    Quote Originally Posted by ahimanic
    Is there a way to measure the cogs to see if they are worn? No visible hook has developed in the teeth.
    Yes, Rholoff makes a tool to measure the cogs on a cassette. Sometimes you get those "hooks", and sometimes you don't.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    Carpe Noctem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    311
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Yes, Rholoff makes a tool to measure the cogs on a cassette. Sometimes you get those "hooks", and sometimes you don't.

    The Rholoff tool is certainly well built but because the tension applied isn't measurable it's inconsistent. Tho other downside is that although it can more or less tell you if the cog is worn it can't provide any quantifiable measurement, ie % worn. Has any one seen a more precise tool or measuring device?
    Off season? What off season?

  10. #10
    Au'Right!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    396

    My 1 cent

    If you change you chain often it will help increase the time between having to change c/r and cassette. If your chain is kept fresh it (it'll be less worn) it will adversly affect the rest of the drivetrain less.
    Problem: "Bike has trouble going up steep hills."
    Fix: Recommend pressing harder on the pedals.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •