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  1. #1
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    removing truvativ.. isoflow chainring...

    I'm having trouble removing these 4 bolt chainrings from the crank. When I put my hex tool in the bolt, both side of the bolt spin, meaning its not getting any grip, and its not tightening NOR loosening.

    (I have removed chainrings before, but this one is retarded).

    Any ideas for stopping the slippage?

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    never knew they had a tool for it, cus I removed all my used bikes chainrings without it >_>

    oh well, thanks for the info though, probably won't buy the tool cus I shouldnt have to i think.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by taikuodo
    never knew they had a tool for it, cus I removed all my used bikes chainrings without it >_>

    oh well, thanks for the info though, probably won't buy the tool cus I shouldnt have to i think.
    good luck, would rather spend hours trying to get them off instead of $9 for a tool

  5. #5
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    I'm pretty sure I dont recall seeing slots in the backside of the chainring connectors on my isoflows. When I looked I was under the impression they were either nutcerts or some kind of decorative rivets so the rings weren't made to be replaceable. I'll double check tomorrow.
    Metal has two purposes in this world:
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  6. #6
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    yeah I just checked, no slots...
    kind of crappy , they have hex bolts but they don't let you remove the rings. Odd.

    Time to look on ebay for a newer crank.

    PS. Is powerspline the same as ISIS? Im guessing not.

  7. #7
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    Since I'm a cheap bastard, I've thought about just getting some chainring nuts and drilling out the factory rivets. I havn't looked closely enough at the factory construction yet to make a call on wether it will work or not, so dont take the idea as a "will work" kinda thing. Eventually I plan on building a bash ring, and will have to figure it out, but till I do, this is an idea.
    Metal has two purposes in this world:
    1. To be played loud.
    2. To be bent to my will.

  8. #8
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    yeah... with this stupid crank you can't even put a bashring, or make it single speed / 1x9 if you wanted to (what i wanted to do).

  9. #9
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    Hey, not true, you can get them off. I just did it a week ago. Just use two hex wrenches instead and they will come off. (One on either side.) They where pretty tight on mine. I've got my bike setup as a 1X9 with a Surly chainring and a jumpstop.

    ER

  10. #10
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    ER, which size hex did you use on the other side?
    I have tried 5-4-3-2.5 and they do not fit.

    my backside of the crank is slick, and does not seem helical.

  11. #11
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    http://www.sram.com/en/service/truva...D=1&subcatID=5

    took less than 1 minute to find the manuals online

  12. #12
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    ah dan0, thanks
    I see the problem now.

    I have X-Flow which is not equal to Isoflow.

    Tricky tricky.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    http://www.sram.com/en/service/truva...D=1&subcatID=5

    took less than 1 minute to find the manuals online
    I spent a few minutes checking through that link, and found Isoflow for road bikes, but not for MTB's. Also didn't see anything newer than 05. I still havn't made it out to the garage to check my cranks so cant say for sure, but I looked at em a while back when thinking about a bash ring and could swear they were riveted. I'll have to get off my lazy butt tomorrow and check for sure.
    Metal has two purposes in this world:
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    2. To be bent to my will.

  14. #14
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    Check out my post in the Bikes and Frames forum, I've got a pic of the single chainring isoflow setup.

  15. #15
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    edit: So, I'm a retard, just realised I have the X-flow cranks as well and not the Isoflow cranks like I thought.

    Isoflow = removable chainring
    X-flow = non removable chainring
    Last edited by kwrangln; 11-09-2007 at 09:26 AM.
    Metal has two purposes in this world:
    1. To be played loud.
    2. To be bent to my will.

  16. #16
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    Excellent information ... THANK YOU for the posting.

    Our local LBS bike mechanic mentioned a family member of mine needed a new crankset because it didn't have replaceable chainrings. So, I purchased one as a Christmas Gift. I'm over at my brothers place and I'm looking at the hex bolts on the crank wondering why the chain ring couldn't be replaced .... Your comments above answer my question ... must be the "X-Flow" = non removeable chainrings that come stock on the Cannondale F300. The X-Flow is listed as OEM only. I looked back in the 2006 Cannondale catalog which just listed the cranks as "Truvativ Isoflow" ...no mention they are not replaceable ... :-) of course not. Replacement will be the Shimano Alivio FC-M410 which is the least expensive crankset with fully replaceable chainrings.

  17. #17
    Rod
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    A crankset without replaceable chainrings is hard for me to wrap my mind around. Anyone else see this as a design flaw? Why would anyone purchase this? If I'm completely naive someone please explain Truvative (SRAM)'s reasoning.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  18. #18
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    I was looking further .... the F300 had many cranks over the years

    Examples
    - Truvative Isoflow
    - Sugino (this doesn't appear to be in production for Mtn Bike anymore).

    The main reason they offer the OEM's these non-replaceable chainrings is to make the bikes less expensive or gain a few more dollars in profit ... likely a little of both.

    It is interesting where they cut corners ... e.g. chains

    Seems like you have to spend about $1,000 for the components to be reasonable on all corners of a Hard tail bike.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod
    A crankset without replaceable chainrings is hard for me to wrap my mind around. Anyone else see this as a design flaw? Why would anyone purchase this? If I'm completely naive someone please explain Truvative (SRAM)'s reasoning.
    Can you say "disposable". It is hard to imagine that the riveted cranks can be any cheaper to produce than cranks with chainring bolts, but I suppose that 22 cent difference in material cost and 8 cents difference in labour cost in Taiwan translates to about $30-$40 difference at retail on the LBS showroom floor.

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