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  1. #1
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    Removing Shifter Cable from SRAM X9 Shifters?

    So my older X9 shifters had this nice little plug you threaded out to remove the shifter cable. Simple, easy, great.

    My new X9 shifters lack this convienient feature. Do I really have to take the whole shifter apart to get the cable out or am I completely missing something? Thanks. It seems like SRAM wouldn't get rid of a feature that made so much sense.
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  2. #2
    meh....
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession
    So my older X9 shifters had this nice little plug you threaded out to remove the shifter cable. Simple, easy, great.

    My new X9 shifters lack this convienient feature. Do I really have to take the whole shifter apart to get the cable out or am I completely missing something? Thanks. It seems like SRAM wouldn't get rid of a feature that made so much sense.
    Assuming triggers, yes, you have to take the cover off. Just unscrew the aluminum knob and it comes off.

  3. #3
    One Gear
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    Once you take the cover off, keep you thumb on top of the spring.

  4. #4
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    keep in mind that when these guys say cover, they don't mean the screw on the bottom of the shifters!!! Here's the way to go about it.
    1. loosen shifter clamps on handlebars (or brake clamps)
    2. locate fat plus sign on TOP of shifter. it should be shiny metal.
    3. unscrew said fat plus sign on top of shifter, and take cover off.
    4. take shifter cable out, put new one in
    5. recover shifter assembly, tighten plus sign.
    6. tighten clamp on shifter or brake assembly
    7. Go ride.

    hope that helps.

  5. #5
    Nightmare on Lyrik st. VI
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    Does it hurt reading the instructions?

    The first time I heard the horror stories of people who unscrewed the lever at the bottom I felt sorry for them. But when I think better of it, it's well deserved.

    Sorry for sounding an @ss, but isn't a thing that is performed periodically expected to be covered on an user manual?

    Here's the manual:
    http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/...ger%202-06.pdf

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by amrgb
    Does it hurt reading the instructions?

    The first time I heard the horror stories of people who unscrewed the lever at the bottom I felt sorry for them. But when I think better of it, it's well deserved.

    Sorry for sounding an @ss, but isn't a thing that is performed periodically expected to be covered on an user manual?
    Shouldn't SRAM make it easier to do a thing that is performed periodically?

    It seems like an over complicated procedure for something that was so simple on the last generation shifters.


    A thank you to the rest of you guys.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by amrgb
    Does it hurt reading the instructions?

    The first time I heard the horror stories of people who unscrewed the lever at the bottom I felt sorry for them. But when I think better of it, it's well deserved.

    Sorry for sounding an @ss, but isn't a thing that is performed periodically expected to be covered on an user manual?

    Here's the manual:
    http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/...ger%202-06.pdf
    Here, Here. I have to agree with this statement. It's a lost art of having some patience and reading a couple of sentences to see how you are supposed to do it. I have ruined a set of older grip shifts trying to change cable and unscrewing the wrong part, so I am in that group of people who learned the hard way. You don't make the error again though. That's what life's about.
    ... And I Am You,
    And What I See Is Me!

  8. #8
    pedal pusher
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    That stupid little + plug on the side totally sucks. On my wife's it's made if rubber, and pretty much destroyed itself as I tried to unscrew it. I finally removed the top of the body (4 2.5mm Allen screws), held the spring in place, and put a new cable in the easy way.

  9. #9
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    I'm trying to change the cable on my dad's XO shifter, and it was easy enough to get apart and to get the old cable out, but how do you guys get the new cable in?
    The little bend in the circular plastic part that holds the cable makes it really tough to thread it through. In fact, I tried so many times and it kept fraying that I need to go get a new cable tomorrow..
    Any advice? (i tried guiding it with a micro screwdriver, pre-bending it with pliers, etc. etc. it just doesn't want to get around the bend)

  10. #10
    Calm Like a Bomb
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    Carbon Wilson
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipes10
    Man they make it look so easy! Has anyone else had trouble feeding it through? Mine keeps getting stuck and not making it around the bend..

  12. #12
    Nightmare on Lyrik st. VI
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    Use a needle or a clip to help the cable through. When I did it, it also got stuck, but didn't give that much trouble.

  13. #13
    pedal pusher
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    According to the PDF I downloaded from Sram a couple weeks ago, they claim you shouldn't take the body apart (unlike the above video shows), and that you simply have to shove the cable through the side hole after removing the plug. Save yourself a ton of trouble, and just take the body off. Hold onto the spring while you do it, or it may pop off. I had it pop off one shifter, but it was very simple to figure out how it went back on.

  14. #14
    Calm Like a Bomb
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    there is no plug on a x9/x0 shifter
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  15. #15
    pedal pusher
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipes10
    there is no plug on a x9/x0 shifter
    That's right, I was installing an X.7.

  16. #16
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    Saving the installation instructions as you buy new components is a good idea.

    I don't want to sound like some nerd from Bicycling Magazine but here is what I do. I take a Zip-Loc bag and write the name of the bike on it. Then as I buy new parts I put the installation instructions in the bag for future reference.

    I just replaced the cables in my SRAM X-0 shifters and by going back to the instructions I immediately found out how to get the old cables out. I needed to slide a cable hook over to remove the cable and the instructions explained this.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyin' Bryan
    Saving the installation instructions as you buy new components is a good idea.

    I don't want to sound like some nerd from Bicycling Magazine but here is what I do. I take a Zip-Loc bag and write the name of the bike on it. Then as I buy new parts I put the installation instructions in the bag for future reference.

    I just replaced the cables in my SRAM X-0 shifters and by going back to the instructions I immediately found out how to get the old cables out. I needed to slide a cable hook over to remove the cable and the instructions explained this.
    Thanks for the tip, but I knew exactly how to get to the cable and to get the old one out, I just was having trouble getting the new one in even though I knew how it was supposed to go. Turns out since I was trying to put a particular kind of teflon-coated cable in that required me to trim one side, the cable was fraying every time I tried to get it around the bend in the plastic holder. When I used a cheaper steel cable with a soldered end, it slid in first try.

  18. #18
    Nightmare on Lyrik st. VI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyin' Bryan
    Saving the installation instructions as you buy new components is a good idea.

    I don't want to sound like some nerd from Bicycling Magazine but here is what I do. I take a Zip-Loc bag and write the name of the bike on it. Then as I buy new parts I put the installation instructions in the bag for future reference.

    I just replaced the cables in my SRAM X-0 shifters and by going back to the instructions I immediately found out how to get the old cables out. I needed to slide a cable hook over to remove the cable and the instructions explained this.
    I did one better. Because when you buy a bike you don't get the manuals for its parts, I spent a couple of hours going through the manufacturer's websites to collect all instructions, technical manuals, etc. I have everything at hand on my computer... which means that occasionally my mouse and keyboard get all dirty with oil

  19. #19
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    But, no one has yet to answer the question about getting a cut end cable into the shifter. I have encountered the same problem. The only way I was able to get around this was to cut a groove in the round plastic piece where the cable initially goes so I could directly put the cable through the hole that ends up exiting the round piece, and then lay it through the groove so the head butts up against the stop where it belongs. I hope that you can make out what I'm saying. I just did this on an X9 shifter, but I didn't take pictures. I really feel that this design is pretty dumb (unless you always get new cables, which I don't think is necessary).

  20. #20
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    Quote Originally Posted by penovich View Post
    But, no one has yet to answer the question about getting a cut end cable into the shifter. I have encountered the same problem. The only way I was able to get around this was to cut a groove in the round plastic piece where the cable initially goes so I could directly put the cable through the hole that ends up exiting the round piece, and then lay it through the groove so the head butts up against the stop where it belongs. I hope that you can make out what I'm saying. I just did this on an X9 shifter, but I didn't take pictures. I really feel that this design is pretty dumb (unless you always get new cables, which I don't think is necessary).
    make sure the cable is wound tight at the end, and put a drop or 2 of crazy glue on it, make sure it's new glue and thin so it wicks up the cable a tad... you can also lightly file the end round once it's glued too which will make it easier.

    also once you start using glue on the ends you don't need the crimps any more and can pull and re-install cables at will, no more cutting or shortening the cable
    If it's already used cable make sure you clean any grease/oil or dirt off before gluing or the glue wont wick up and hold properly
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

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