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  1. #1
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    Rapid Rise Opinions

    I can see the theory behind using the rapid rise type mech on a MTB, but in practice is it any better than the conventional system? I assume it requires a dedicated shifter pod to mate with it.

    I've never had any great trouble with the usual system but would consider changing if it were light years better.

    What do think?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major Clanger View Post
    I can see the theory behind using the rapid rise type mech on a MTB, but in practice is it any better than the conventional system? I assume it requires a dedicated shifter pod to mate with it.

    I've never had any great trouble with the usual system but would consider changing if it were light years better.

    What do think?
    Don't waste your time.
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  3. #3
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    I should have checked first but it seems that rapid rise is not made anymore, so the whole thing's a bit of a non-starter. I'd seen a NOS rear mech but by the time I'm used to it it'll be worn out and I'll have to change back to a conventional system.

    Thanks anyway.......
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  4. #4
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    They're a pain in the ass anyways. Most people that bring bikes into the shop I work at with those rear derailers on them want them changed out.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinnyspinspin View Post
    They're a pain in the ass anyways. Most people that bring bikes into the shop I work at with those rear derailers on them want them changed out.
    I think they're AWESOME , so
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  6. #6
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    One of my daughters bike is rapid rise...

    It is a little bit harder to set up than the normal but seems to work just fine.

  7. #7
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    I think the shifters are the same, and only the rear derailleur defines low or top-normal.
    If so, then there is no real downside - if the derailleur breaks or wears out and there isn't another one available, you should be able to install a top-normal one and carry on.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc View Post
    I think the shifters are the same, and only the rear derailleur defines low or top-normal.
    If so, then there is no real downside - if the derailleur breaks or wears out and there isn't another one available, you should be able to install a top-normal one and carry on.
    True
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  9. #9
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    +1 for Rapid Rise. I wouldn't say it's light-years better, but I prefer it. Shifting just seems a bit more intuitive. It works for me, at least.

  10. #10
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    ^^^ I will say it works better esp. for gripshifters - the tension feels more equal up/down shifting.
    I also like that the gears (front and rear) shift in the 'same direction' - i.e., same motions make the gear harder, or easier
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    ^^^ I will say it works better esp. for gripshifters - the tension feels more equal up/down shifting.
    I also like that the gears (front and rear) shift in the 'same direction' - i.e., same motions make the gear harder, or easier
    X2 on the above. I swapped out a normal RD for a rapid rise on my road bike w/ bar end shifters. Both shifters now move the same direction, down for lower gear, up for higher gears. I tried with them moving opposite for a few months and could never get used to one shifter moving one way and one moving the other way. Was always shifting up instead of down. Putting the same RD on my CX bike. I also like how it shifts down under load much smoother, no need to let off the pedals as much while grinding up a hill when you need to drop a gear. On my touring bike, I moved the normal RD to it and it works OK. That bike has friction mode thumb shifters and they are set up to work properly with the normal RD, so both shifters move forward for lower gears.

    I use the Shimano XT-M770 9sp. RD.

  12. #12
    bt
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    I also like that the gears (front and rear) shift in the 'same direction' - i.e., same motions make the gear harder, or easier
    this^^^^
    Last edited by bt; 02-28-2012 at 03:49 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    ^^^ I will say it works better esp. for gripshifters - the tension feels more equal up/down shifting.
    I also like that the gears (front and rear) shift in the 'same direction' - i.e., same motions make the gear harder, or easier
    Sorry, only one of my 3 bikes is even capable of shifting, and I'm certainly not putting grip shifters on that one. Maybe if I wanted to feel like I was riding away from a department store in 1994.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinnyspinspin View Post
    Sorry, only one of my 3 bikes is even capable of shifting, and I'm certainly not putting grip shifters on that one. Maybe if I wanted to feel like I was riding away from a department store in 1994.
    lol. I agree with you, but I wouldn't knock his preference. To each his own. I use dual control on one bike (most people hate 'em) and regular clickers on another with a RR der.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlouder View Post
    lol. I agree with you, but I wouldn't knock his preference. To each his own. I use dual control on one bike (most people hate 'em) and regular clickers on another with a RR der.
    Aww, I'm just joking' with high dell.
    I think he knows that.
    ****. Maybe he didn't get it and he thinks I'm a ******.
    Dude, I was totally kidding, if you didn't get that.

    I also was born in 1984, so my first bikes were BMX bikes that didn't shift anyways, and when I got into MTB'ing seriously five years ago I was fortunate enough to get a hand-me-down GT XCR3000 from my pops that had thumb shifters. My opinion on rapid rise is purely from having to work on them on customers' bikes, and I think they're a pain in the ass because I finally started to get good at adjusting regular detailers and the RR stuff is BACKWARDS! So yeah.
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  16. #16
    bt
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    walmart has bike mechanics?

  17. #17
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    you guys are going to make me pick neither of you for prom if you don't quit fighting over me
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  18. #18
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    Wal-mart has everything. Bring your bike by sometime, I'll hook it up.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinnyspinspin View Post
    Wal-mart has everything. Bring your bike by sometime, I'll hook it up.
    walmart huh? can I bring this there?
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  20. #20
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    Highdell, I don't even know what that is. But somehow it's probably depressing and political. Thanks a lot.
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  21. #21
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    depressing? you crazy!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  22. #22
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    Answering OP:
    I like RR derailleurs. In fact, Iīve been using RR since 2003 and never went back.
    By that time Shimano had just released the 960 series XTR which had RR as the ONLY derailleur option as they were suposed to be the natural match to the Dual Control levers also released first time (and as only option too) on that group, so I decided to give it a try. Later on I moved to DC too, which I also liked quite a lot, but thatīs another story. Becouse of that, people tend to believe RR were exclusive to DC levers, and since DC are gone, so is RR. But thatīs not true becouse XTR 950 series already had a RR derailleur version (see pic) If Shimano doesnīt make them anymore is becouse the newer shadow type derailleur cages and cable routing donīt allow for an inverted cable pull and spring position construction (correct me if wrong) but Iīm sure they would be here otherwise becouse many people like them.
    I also like the "simetrical" lever action resulting from a RR derailleur. But also believe it shifts up easier than with a stdr derailleur. Some state that they are easier on cogs too (not bending), but Iīve never had any problem with that on a regular derailleur either, so canīt compare...
    What I donīt like is that when cable tension is gone, for example when changing cables or building a new bike, the derailleur will move to the larger cog and up there is really annoying for removing the wheel and the upper pulley will rub all the time with the cassete. But thatīs a minor problem, I guess.
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  23. #23
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    Good replies chaps, thanks.....

    I've really confused myself though and Shimano's website is next to useless for archive information....

    I like the sound of RR but if it's on the way out slowly then if seems daft to buy it in case spares are an issue in the future. Tell me though, are M970 rear mechs all RR and M971 high normal, or is the M971 just a later type derailleur?

    I already have the M970 crankset and cassette - 44-32-22 & 32-11 - and want to run a high normal rear mech - does this mean I need the M971? With regards the front mech; it's a HT frame with top pull and research suggests I should be looking at the M971 but I'd appreciate your input.

    Finally (), and I know this is a Q that'll have been asked a million times, but with the ratios I've got would it be better to use a medium cage on the rear mech? I realise that in doing so I'll lose the extreme combos but this doesn't worry me.

    Sorry if these seem silly questions but my search through the interweb has only confused me more - over to y'all................

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  24. #24
    the catalan connection
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major Clanger View Post
    I like the sound of RR but if it's on the way out slowly then if seems daft to buy it in case spares are an issue in the future. Tell me though, are M970 rear mechs all RR and M971 high normal, or is the M971 just a later type derailleur?
    I wouldnīt care about spare RR parts. The only difference with a stdr derrailleur is actually in the main body (parallelogram), all other little bits are the same, so given the case you would need to replace that, you would be already looking for a whole new derailleur anyway

    Iīm not sure about the part number for a RR 97xx series. I can check back home though since is the one I have on my bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Major Clanger View Post
    With regards the front mech; it's a HT frame with top pull and research suggests I should be looking at the M971 but I'd appreciate your input.
    97xx front derailleurs are Dual Pull thanks to a special weird looking cable clamp/routing design. They will move either with a cable pulling from above or from underneath. Up from there they have all the other options: High clamp (also called bottom swing)/Low clamp (also called top swing), E-Type and maybe another I canīt remember...

    Quote Originally Posted by Major Clanger View Post
    Finally (), and I know this is a Q that'll have been asked a million times, but with the ratios I've got would it be better to use a medium cage on the rear mech? I realise that in doing so I'll lose the extreme combos but this doesn't worry me.
    Thatīs an easy one.Go to the second sticky post in this same forum....starts like: "When to use a short cage...?"
    "Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordly evidence of the fact." George Elliot

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major Clanger View Post
    I can see the theory behind using the rapid rise type mech on a MTB, but in practice is it any better than the conventional system? I assume it requires a dedicated shifter pod to mate with it.

    I've never had any great trouble with the usual system but would consider changing if it were light years better.

    What do think?
    I wasn't really a fan of the Rapid-Rise rear shifting but I love reversed front derailleures, where the "relaxed" position is the big ring. I'm surprised no companies have revived this concept.
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