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  1. #1
    Clydesdale Warrior
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Pedals Stuck in Hussfelt Cranks

    I want to switch pedals but the old ones are stuck in the cranks.

    The cranks are the "newer" style Hussfelts with the steel thread inserts. The pedals, Shimano 545...they are the originals that came with the bike, and this is the first time I have tried taking them off (after about 2 years).

    I've tried a 15mm wrench (not a pedal specific wrench)...and managed to stretch it out to about 17mm before it stopped holding on, and tried a 6mm hex socket on the back (using a 24 inch torque wrench), the hex part of the socket literally shattered at about 80-90 ft/lbs and the pedal did not budge...soaking in WD40 overnight did nothing to help (there is no visible corrosion)...and yes, I'm turning the wrenches the right way, toward the back of the bike on both sides.

    Is it safe to use the heat method described here with the Hussfelt cranks: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/stuck-pedals.html

    My worry is the heat might screw up the interface between the steel thread inserts and the aluminum arms on these cranks. (I don't want to destroy my cranks in the process...I'll return the new ones and keep using the original pedals if I have to)

    Think the heat method is safe for me to try? Any other ideas?

    sh0rty :P
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  2. #2
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    WD-40 is not really a good penetrant. Try something like Liquid Wrench. And Ammonia works good for aluminum corrosion.

  3. #3
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    never tried that heat method, but...

    I've had good luck removing stuck pedals using a Craftsman combo 15mm wrench (box and open end)- not plugging a name brand, but they are thicker than pedal wrenches and also have a warranty, and are not likely to turn into a 17mm wrench. There are 2 things to try 1) try fitting a short length of pipe over the box end of the wrench, then apply a firm amount of increasing pressure, until you get nervous, or the pedal unloosens. 2) if #1 does not work, then using the same wrench, strike the box end of the wrench(wrapped in a towel) with a large rubber mallet or better yet, would be a dead-blow hammer. Use repeated, sharp blows- not huge swings, but enough of a smack to break the bond of whatever is going on there. If this does not work, I would heat the threads with a heat gun, then immediately try #2 above. In both methods, it is best to hold the crankarm and wrench with one hand, while holding the hammer in the other hand- this is to make sure all of your energy is directed at only the pedal threads and not the bb or bike frame.Good luck.

  4. #4
    Clydesdale Warrior
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Too narrow....

    Quote Originally Posted by dumper
    I've had good luck removing stuck pedals using a Craftsman combo 15mm wrench (box and open end)
    The problem is...the 15mm wrench flats on these pedals is too narrow to fit a regular wrench....otherwise I would have used that rather than wrecking my cone wrench.

    Craftsman is good with the warranty, got a free replacement for that hex socket I destroyed yesterday, no questions asked.

    sh0rty :P

  5. #5
    Clydesdale Warrior
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    New question here. PB Blaster

    Quote Originally Posted by WaveDude
    WD-40 is not really a good penetrant. Try something like Liquid Wrench. And Ammonia works good for aluminum corrosion.
    Don't think it would be aluminum corrosion becaus ethe threads and spindle are both steel. I found mention of this in another forum: http://www.pbblaster.com/store/morei...m?Product_ID=1

    Think I'll try to find some, from the sounds of it, this stuff is the best for releasing "frozen" threads...

    sh0rty :P
    Last edited by sh0rty; 07-03-2006 at 12:08 PM.

  6. #6
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by sh0rty
    The problem is...the 15mm wrench flats on these pedals is too narrow to fit a regular wrench....otherwise I would have used that rather than wrecking my cone wrench.

    Craftsman is good with the warranty, got a free replacement for that hex socket I destroyed yesterday, no questions asked.

    sh0rty :P
    You used a cone wrench? Not strong enough. Get a pedal wrench - and make sure you are turning it the correct direction.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    You used a cone wrench? Not strong enough. Get a pedal wrench - and make sure you are turning it the correct direction.
    yeah you will never be able to remove anything with a cone wrench, you don't have enouyght leverage...

    Buy a REAL pedal wrench !

  8. #8
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    Could not find the "PB Blaster", so I got some Liquid Wrench "Super Penetrator". It worked! The left one came off easy a few seconds after I sprayed, the right one was a bit harder, sprayed 3 times, moved up to the long torque wrench again...I was up to about the force that the hex socket brock last time....heard a "snap"....thought I broke the socket again...but it was the pedal letting go! They came off, nothing is broken, and the new pedals went on with no problems (with a thick coating of grease on the threads of course). :-)

    Thanks everybody for the feedback.

    sh0rty :P

  9. #9
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    We had an Axiom platform pedal seized into a Truvativ Hussefelt crank from one winter of riding this spring, the insert came out with the pedal (using a proper 15mm pedal wrench and alot of force). We could never get the insert off the pedal, it was likely installed without antiseize. Truvativ fixed the cranks (replaced the insert) under warrenttee, but Norco didnot warrnettee the pedal (not thier fault). The lbs did replace the pedal at cost - and it wasn't thier fault since they didnot do the install - nothing like a good lbs to look after your own mistakes....

    Probably not what you want to hear...

  10. #10
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    ... and if we just ... Got the pedals off...

    See posting #4 above.

    sh0rty :P

  11. #11
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    I've had this same problem as well and used liquid wrench which did work it loose after a good spray. Has anyone experienced broken Husselflets at the pedal eye? The threads appear to be the weakest point and even with the steel thread insert, and the old pedal washer they included before the steel insert, I've experienced these cranks breaking under normal all mountain use. Creates a very sharp nasty problem..

  12. #12
    Just hit it with speed
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    I was having a similar problem but I only had the pedals on for three months before switching. I went as far as to get a 2 1/2 foot lead pipe to put on the end of my adjustable wrench I eventually stripped the wrench(I didn't even know this was a possibility) and ruined two allen keys trying to take it off from the other side. I sucked it up and took it into a bike shop and they popped the puppies right off after a little effort. (They admitted it was on there well) It was an obvious example of what having the right tools does.

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