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  1. #1
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    Pedal grease port - Pros and cons ??

    Hi, I'm gonna do a second set of custom pinned platform pedals and I'm wondering if a grease port would be something worthy to add too ? On my DMR V8, there's one so you can shoot new grease in without having to take the pedals apart, which is quick and easy. But at the same time, is there really some advantage to this, considering adding new grease doesn't clean the dirt out anyway and you'd still need to service them ?

    Advantages I see are the following :

    You can fine tune the bearings easier since you don't have to deal with the extra grease friction right away, you just fill them up once you're done.

    You can squirt fresh grease in in a snap and cleanly.

    Cool factor.

    Non-advantages I see are :

    Unless you get the inboard bearings sealed, you will still have to service the pedals every now and then to prevent excessive wear on the bearing races.

    It's making the cleaning of old grease even worst since the whole pedal body is full of grease.

    You can potentially drop dirt inside the body when taking the screw off if you're not careful.

    You're more inclined to just grease them up instead of cleaning them.


    For me, it's a matter of only a few more minutes to drill and tap a grease port though. I like the fact that I can assemble them with minimal grease and precisely tune the bearing preload then cleanly fill them up. And I'm planing on fitting an o-ring at the inboard bearings to really seal the system and improve durability.

    Whats your take ?
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  2. #2
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    My '96 San Andreas has a grease port in the suspension pivot. I took it apart once to clean it and it was so clean that I have never bothered to do it again. I just give it a squirt of grease every once in a while till grease comes out and that's it. And, I'm pretty anal about keeping my stuff clean. I say go for it.
    '96 San Andreas
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    '08 KTM 530
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  3. #3
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    As long as you place the port correctly (ie, at the far end of the spindle) the fresh grease will purge the old grease, keeping everything running nicely. Occasional cleaning will always be necessary, but a well thought out grease port will free you from much of it. Make sure that the seal is removable from the other end of the spindle, to facilitate purging.

  4. #4
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    Pedal grease port - Pros and cons ??

    Well the seal I'm planing on using would actually be a 0,75" OD o-ring fitting inside a 0,78" pedal body over the 0,73" OD spindle, so leaving an approximate 0,015" clearance between the seal on the spindle and the pedal body. That should be decent enough to prevent dirt to enter, but to also allow old grease to be pushed out, taking the dirt out too, if any. You can see on the pictures taken before I cleaned the old grease, that there is a dirty grease crust that took the shape of the space where there is no spindle contact with the body. So in theory, that's what the o-ring should prevent from happening. However, I will not be able to remove the o-ring without loosening the spindle enough to pull it out to reach the o-ring.

    Pedal grease port - Pros and cons ??-imageuploadedbytapatalk1364526191.935137.jpg
    Pedal grease port - Pros and cons ??-imageuploadedbytapatalk1364526225.143483.jpg

    For the grease port location, it's located a few mm's below the inboard bearings on my DMR's, so I'm still not sure where I should place it.

    1. Similar to the DMR's.
    2. In the middle point between both in/outboards bearings.
    3. Just above the outboard bearings.

    Option 1 means harder for the grease to reach the outboard bearings, but quite effective for the inboard ones.

    Option 2 is pretty must equal for both bearings.

    Option 3 might be better, but will require a fair amount of grease to get to flush out the old grease.
    Last edited by David C; 03-29-2013 at 08:30 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  5. #5
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    What all are you doing to customize them? I think loose bearing pedals are way too much work. Loose headsets and hubs are fine, but pedals are so finicky. If you're getting new pedals anyway I'd spend the extra $10~20 for cartridges, because they make maintenance a breeze.

  6. #6
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    As far as I'm concerned, option 3 is the right way to do it. Grease is cheap, new pedal bodies or axles are not.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    As far as I'm concerned, option 3 is the right way to do it. Grease is cheap, new pedal bodies or axles are not.
    Yep, couldn't agree more. Go with option 3 man..

  8. #8
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    Pedal grease port - Pros and cons ??

    Looks like the most logical way to go. However I'm still wondering why DMR didn't located the grease port at the far end instead of close to the inboard bearings. Maybe also because there is a body thickness issue to consider. You need at least 2-3mm of thickness to insure a safe and durable threaded hole for the bolt. I'll have to check on this too. Also since the outboard bearings are way better sealed already, maybe it's not as needed to push new grease there as the inboards ones would be. I'll need to take some measurements first at least.

    And Newfangled, I'm doing this because I like to DIY stuff and I feel more fun doing it than buying something more expensive. Overall it's gonna be about $15-20 total, but with many hours of fun in the workshop. But believe me, if I could punch out those races and press in cartridges, then mod the axle to accept the new design and to a high enough tolerance level, I'll do it too
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

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