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  1. #1
    breathing helium
    Reputation: cocheese's Avatar
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    Optimum cable routing for Rohloff?

    I am having a custom frame built and I am toying with the idea of adding the ability to use a Rohloff speedhub. I am thinking of having the cables run internally as well. With as maintenance free as the Rohloff system is, this sounded like a way to get all of the cables out of the way. Plus, I like the idea of the clean look of having the cables hidden from view.

    For you Rohloff users out there, what is the best route for the cables? I'm thinking the straightest line of course, but any advice you Rohloff users might have would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Reviewer/Tester
    Reputation: Rainman's Avatar
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    I run my cables down the side of my downtube on the SIR 9 using two zipties on the bottle cage. I attach the cables at the headset, bottle cage, EBB and chainstay.

    I route them across the top of the EBB and along the chainstay to the hub.

    HTH,


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  3. #3
    breathing helium
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    Thanks Rainman. I saw the pics on your Rolly/Poploc thread. Great looking steed you have there.

  4. #4
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    I agree with Rainman: downtube to chainstay is the straightest, cleanest way to go.

    Top tube to seat stay leaves you with a big housing loop around the brake caliper, which doesn't look so pretty.

    It'd be great if you could design a dropped chainstay design which rises up to the axle, ala the NRS. This would let you let you run the cables straight from the chainstay to the external shifter box, with no bends required near the axle.
    speedub.nate
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  5. #5
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    It does not have to have a sharp bend to the external shifter box if running the cables on the top tube, but I am using a rear vee brake on my bike.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
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    I'd also say downtube to chainstay is the neatest and straightest. I have two mates running their Rohloff cables along the top tube to the seat stays. With disc brakes this does create a slight loop in the cables, as the external shifter box is located in the 2 o'clock position, with cables routed upwards. Apart from looking a bit untidy, it doesn't (hasn't) create any problems for them.

    Some pictures of my Rohloff set up on a Thylacine:

    http://www.thylacinecycles.com/galle...ragon_niceness
    http://www.thylacinecycles.com/galle..._AT_Arete02_A3

  7. #7
    Devil Mtn
    Reputation: reklar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TysonRomero
    I'd also say downtube to chainstay is the neatest and straightest
    But if you are running disc brakes, you already have a (small) loop near the disc for the disc brake cable. My vote is actually for the top tube in that case for two reasons: 1) All three cables are relatively close together making it seem less cluttered 2) Exposure of the cables to the elements, sticks, etc., is decreased. My $.02 ...

  8. #8
    ridin' Mary
    Reputation: OhNooo's Avatar
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    I tried doing as reklar proposed and reuse the cable bosses on the seat stay and top tube for the Rohloff cable routing. I couldn't figure out how to do this without the obligatory set of zipties. The end result was not very clean. And when I went over the bars on my Mary when I had a nasty pedal strike that halted the bike, I ripped off some of these zipties with my knee as I made my hasty and unplanned exit from the bike. I also found that hike-a-bike sucked when the cables are along the top-tube, as then you are holding cables instead of holding bike tubes.

    I moved the shifter cables down to the chain-stay and down-tube, and I've been happy ever since. The cables are much shorter, and there is less of a cable mess at the front end of the bike as the path from shifter to down tube is much cleaner than from the shifter to the top tube.

  9. #9
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    If you have a conventional disc caliper on the seat stay, then routing the cable under the chainstay is probably the cleanest, as stated above, and like this Phil Woods frame.


    If you are doing a custom frame, then my preference is to run the cables down the seat stay, and move the disc caliper:

    Less mud contamination, and less chance of nailing the external shift box if you like to do skinnies.

  10. #10
    ridin' Mary
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    Wow, That's a large pile of dinero you have wrapped up in those bikes! They're beauties!

    I used a slightly different variation on the cable routing around the bottom bracket. I found a straighter line for the cabling by routing over the EBB instead of the tight turn you show in the first picture where the cables go under the EBB. It's a matter of personal taste whether you want the cables out of sight or not, and how straight you want the cables to run. I don't have bosses for the cables, so I can route it anywheres using zip-ties.

  11. #11
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    I had a similar dilemma when I was figuring out my Carl Strong frame last year. After some helpful discussions with itsdoable, I was all set for running the shift cables down the seat stay, and mounting the disc caliper on the chain stay.

    When I ran this by Carl, he noted that he preferred mounting the caliper on the seat stay, purely for rigidity. Not be a frame builder myself, I figured that was a fair call, and went with the shift cables running ender the downtube, under the EBB and along the chainstay. No problems so far

    Photo courtesy of Chad/Red Barn


  12. #12
    ridin' Mary
    Reputation: OhNooo's Avatar
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    Oh Man... Another beauty. I wish I had the bucks to plonk down for a custom frame to get Rohloff-specific dropouts like that. Could you show a pic of the full bike, instead of just the teaser of her rear end?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhNooo
    Wow, That's a large pile of dinero you have wrapped up in those bikes! They're beauties!
    ...perhaps I should clarify that I don't own the Phil Woods bike, it's off another Rohloff thread. We do have 2 custom steel byStickel Rohloff bikes (the red one shown above), and they have been in both oceans and up to the 14,000ft mark on various rides, and are excellent low maintenance machines.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhNooo
    Oh Man... Another beauty. I wish I had the bucks to plonk down for a custom frame to get Rohloff-specific dropouts like that. Could you show a pic of the full bike, instead of just the teaser of her rear end?
    No qualms! Some more pics here, in the Custom forums.

    Steve Stickel was another choice for framebuilder, especially after seeing itsdoable's bikes. Unfortunately, he was in the process of moving shop when I was ready to pull the trigger. Thylacine also made a really nice Rohloff-ready frame recently, which also had the downtube/chainstay cable routing.

    As for having the money, it did take quite a while to save the funds necessary, but let me tell you - it was well worth it!

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