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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Karve's Avatar
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    New Sram Chain seems wider?

    Ok So my set up is

    • Shimano HG53 Chain - 9 speed chain
    • X9 Rear Mech
    • SRAM PG 970 MTB 9 Speed Cassette


    Chain has seen some hard times so I changed it to a

    • SRAM Chains PC 991 9sp


    ... which you think would work with all that other sram stuff...

    No joy the chain seems wider and keeps wanting to climb the cassette.. the gears slip everywhere

    What is going on? Have Sram changed the width of their chains recently? What chain should I be using then?

    Any help appreciated.

    Cheers
    Last edited by Karve; 04-06-2007 at 05:10 AM.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    It's more likely to be your cassette, which will have worn with the old chain. The cassette may no longer 'fit' a new chain. Ho wmany miles have you done on the old cassette/chain?
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  3. #3
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    Ive had it for about a year now.. 2-3 rides a week? say 2500 miles? Is that a lot?

  4. #4
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    2500 is relatively high, although a lot depends on how you've maintained your drivetrain along the way. Was that all with the same chain?

  5. #5
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    Same chain.... fairly badly maintained tbh New cassette I think might be the way ahead

  6. #6
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    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    It's very likely that you've worn the cassette out by running the same chain for so long. There's also a possibility that your chainring(s) may have suffered a similar fate. Usually, once a chain wears beyond a certain point it will quite quickly start to wear sprockets and chainrings. I'd certainly suggest investing in a new cassette and being initially cautious with the amount of torque you put into pedalling lest your new chain should slip on a front ring also. If you're having a shop fit the new cassette, you could ask them to check chainrings for excessive wear. The basic maintenance guide linked in my signature may be of some interest to you.
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  7. #7
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    Ah those guides are great thanks.

    I cant seem to find any Sram specific lockring tools. Do they take Shimano ones

    Which of these would be ideal?

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/S...ckring&x=0&y=0

  8. #8
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    It's the same lock-ring tool for SRAM and Shimano. For value for money and quality, I'd recommend Park Tool's FR-5.

  9. #9
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    Sounds like what everyone else said. your chain will wear and stretch with the cassette and chainrings. I find its easier to replace the cassette and the chain at the same time.

  10. #10
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    cassettes last through several chains if the chain is replaced when it's stretched 1/16" over 12 links (12").

    the new style is wider it seems (bulge on the side plates), and runs noisier than the older type i find. mine shifts ok though.

  11. #11
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    Many thanks all... that seemed to do the trick.. lesson learned.. keen that chain clean and swap them over every so often

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