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  1. #1
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    Reputation: mtbnewguy's Avatar
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    New chain problems...

    I have a problem with my new chain: I've been riding on the same rig for about 1 1/2 yr. and often heard from my LBS that the chain should've replaced a couple of times by now... I of course thought that this was a gimmick to sell me on a new chain. Anyways, they had a sale on chains and I asked for a new one. Well it's "skipping" specially when I hammer it down, or when going up-hill. If I manage to spin faster on a climb, the problem goes away. Will the new chain "adjust" itself? is it a problem with the crankset?

    Any ideas?

    Thanks.
    semper ad excelsum

  2. #2
    The devil is an angel too
    Reputation: FrozenK's Avatar
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    You had the chain on too long, let it stretch too much and now your cassette -and maybe your chainrings- is toasted. If you let it on, the cassette will mess up the new chain and then when you finally replace the cassette, the chain you messed up with the old cassette will mess up the new cassette, etc...

    Bottom line: you need a new cassette and maybe new chainrings. I'd invest the extra 10 bucks in one of those chainchecker gizmos so you know when to replace your chain and don't have this happen again.
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  3. #3
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    that bad uh?

    damn... I may be looking at about $150.00 worth of components uh?
    Now, you mean my old chain was too long? The bike was assembled at the LBS by an "authorized" dealer... wtf?
    semper ad excelsum

  4. #4
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    Wink drivetrain longevity can be had by.....

    Hey ho human, it all depends on how you ride, where you ride and your maint scheduale.
    one thing clear- chains do not stretch- they get longer by wear.

    If you get in water, maint is very high, if you cross the chain big ring big cassette or small small you create undo wear on a chain. both cost in the long run.

    when you have a new bike/drivetrain- I recommend getting 3 or 4 more chains and regularrly change them clean them before yousee anywear. with that many chains everything wears alot slower.

  5. #5
    The devil is an angel too
    Reputation: FrozenK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbnewguy
    damn... I may be looking at about $150.00 worth of components uh?
    Now, you mean my old chain was too long? The bike was assembled at the LBS by an "authorized" dealer... wtf?
    No, what I meant was that the chain was on the bike for too long, as in you should have replaced it earlier.

    It may not be that bad, a cassette you can get for about 30-40 bucks and you probably won't have to replace your rings, at least not the three of them. Usually you ride most of the time in just one ring (the middle one) so, that's the one that's more likely to need replacement. The other two are more likely than not ok.
    Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known.

    Oscar Wilde

  6. #6
    MTB B'dos
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
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    In this 1.5 years you've had the biek, how many miles have you put on it? On average a chain last anywhere from 600-1,000 miles on an MTB on a road bike they last about 3 times as long 'cause they don't go through all the crap we do. If you lay your old chain out flat and stretch it taught, then measure from the back of a pin 24" you should arrive at the back of another pin. If you don't get right to the back of a pin then you chain is worn and you can see by how muc. Generally you can go up to 1/32 without any effects on your drive-train, going to 1/16 starts to push it and can cause wear. Anything over 1/16" and you start to look for new rings and/or cassette.
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  7. #7
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    Chain changes....

    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    On average a chain last anywhere from 600-1,000 miles on an MTB on a road bike they last about 3 times as long 'cause they don't go through all the crap we do..
    I ride muddy trails with lots of terrain changes plus carry 230lbs.... My chain gets abused eventhough I'm very careful on the shifting... I replace it every 3-4 months. I use a tool to check chain wear... My cassette and chainrings are in great shape and I don't break chains links anymore... (My riding friends break links every 3-4 rides, you can hear their chain-transmission grinding, and they skip the chain plenty, always complaining of their trasmission and adjustments..)

    I keep the used ones handy (I never let them get %100 used), on multi-day riding with little maintenance opp. I change the chain to a clean one.... (yes I;m addicted to perfect,precise shifting... LOVE my SRAM X0!!!)

  8. #8
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    Mhh… I don’t have the old chain anymore, so I cannot test it. I believe I did put... oh a little over 2000 miles on it. I live/ ride in the dry, hot & beautiful southwest , so mud/ water are not a problem and I do like to keep the bike clean and well adjusted. The problem actually showed only when I put the new chain. Anyways, thanks to all for the advice.
    semper ad excelsum

  9. #9
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    Reputation: Bikinfoolferlife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    In this 1.5 years you've had the biek, how many miles have you put on it? On average a chain last anywhere from 600-1,000 miles on an MTB on a road bike they last about 3 times as long 'cause they don't go through all the crap we do. If you lay your old chain out flat and stretch it taught, then measure from the back of a pin 24" you should arrive at the back of another pin. If you don't get right to the back of a pin then you chain is worn and you can see by how muc. Generally you can go up to 1/32 without any effects on your drive-train, going to 1/16 starts to push it and can cause wear. Anything over 1/16" and you start to look for new rings and/or cassette.
    Change that 24" to 12" and your measuring works...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
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