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  1. #1
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    new chain and casette = grind + intermittient clacking noise?

    I just put on a new chain and cassette on one of my MTBs. I lubed the hell out of the whole setup and my drivetrain sounds (and feels) grindy and there is an intermittient clacking noise. Is this just the new stuff breaking in?
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  2. #2
    wawe member
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    Most likely your old chainrings, if your cassette was worn out your rings should be too. The old rings can stretch out your new chain and cause the new cassette to wear prematurely.

  3. #3
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    The grindy sound is just the sound of a new chain on a new cassette and old chainrings, it will lessen with time once they mesh in. The clacking noise sounds like you new chain has one or more stiff links. Go around the chain checking for stiff links.

    Chains don't stretch, it is next to impossible. The method which causes chains to become longer from pin to pin is the actual wear out of the inner link plate bore where the pins go through. If your old chain was badly worn it will change the effective pitch of your chainrings. If you get chain suck after changing the chain then you need new rings, if you don't get chain suck then it shouldn't be too much of a problem.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearHead
    Chains don't stretch, it is next to impossible. The method which causes chains to become longer from pin to pin is the actual wear out of the inner link plate bore where the pins go through.
    I disagree. A new chain measures exactly 12" from pin to pin over 6 links (12 pins). My worn out chain on my bike measures 12 1/16" measured with a metal spoke ruler several times. How can that be explained? I don't get it...
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerx40
    I disagree. A new chain measures exactly 12" from pin to pin over 6 links (12 pins). My worn out chain on my bike measures 12 1/16" measured with a metal spoke ruler several times. How can that be explained? I don't get it...
    This shouldn't be this complicated but here it goes. The chain pins are rigidly fixed to the outer link plates. If you measure the distance from pin to pin on an outer link of a worn out chain it will still be exactly the same as a brand new chain. Also, if you take an old chain and compare it to a new chain, you will notice that the pins have slop as they move inside the bore of the inner plate ends. It is actually the diameter on the pins being worn smaller and the bore of the inner plate ends being worn larger which causes the chain to lengthen.

    If this is still hard to understand, take a couple links apart on a chain.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearHead
    If you measure the distance from pin to pin on an outer link of a worn out chain it will still be exactly the same as a brand new chain.
    Yeah, I know how a chain works. What I'm saying is that pin to pin outer distance is longer on old chains. I've measured Sachs chains as long as 12 3/32" at the shop that I used to work at?! Comparing the old and new chains side by side, you could see that they don't match pin to pin. The new chain is always 12" pin to pin. What I'm saying is that I don't understand why the pin to pin would change. Maybe it's a funny-house spoke ruler or something.

    I understand that chains have slop as they get worn. I didn't say anything about that.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerx40
    Yeah, I know how a chain works. What I'm saying is that pin to pin outer distance is longer on old chains. I've measured Sachs chains as long as 12 3/32" at the shop that I used to work at?! Comparing the old and new chains side by side, you could see that they don't match pin to pin. The new chain is always 12" pin to pin. What I'm saying is that I don't understand why the pin to pin would change. Maybe it's a funny-house spoke ruler or something.

    I understand that chains have slop as they get worn. I didn't say anything about that.
    Next time you measure a worn chain you should notice that the distance between pins on the outer link plates stays exactly the stame as s new one, it is the distnce beteen pins on the inner plate links that changes. This is due to the slop the chains develop with time on the pins and bore of inner link plate ends. It all ties together and no, chains do not stretch.

  8. #8
    Jm.
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    Slop is one of the factors, but not the only one. I've seen chains stretched out almost a quarter of an inch (over 12"). I'm talking well past 1/8". That "slop" is one of the reasons that a chain stretches, but not the only one.

    In any case, if you aren't getting chainsuck sodale I wouldn't be too worried, but it's most likely related to the rings. Sometimes you can take a dremel and remove some of the excess material that has packed up on the teeth, and basically just "clean" the teeth up. This doesn't change the spacing obviously, so if the spacing is really bad, then you just need new rings, which are pretty cheap.

    Just as an FYI, I have to change my chain at least every 6 months, or I am destroying the other parts of my drivetrain. So I'm buying at least 2 chains a year to prevent chainstretch from ruining my drivetrain, but it's simply what I have to do. It's cheaper than buying XT rear cassettes for sure. The key is to change your chain before you need it, and changing it at 1/32nd of "stretch" is usually a good idea, when it gets towards 1/16th (the next significant increment) you can start to have problems with the cassette and rings.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jm.
    Slop is one of the factors, but not the only one. I've seen chains stretched out almost a quarter of an inch (over 12"). I'm talking well past 1/8". That "slop" is one of the reasons that a chain stretches, but not the only one.

    In any case, if you aren't getting chainsuck sodale I wouldn't be too worried, but it's most likely related to the rings. Sometimes you can take a dremel and remove some of the excess material that has packed up on the teeth, and basically just "clean" the teeth up. This doesn't change the spacing obviously, so if the spacing is really bad, then you just need new rings, which are pretty cheap.

    Just as an FYI, I have to change my chain at least every 6 months, or I am destroying the other parts of my drivetrain. So I'm buying at least 2 chains a year to prevent chainstretch from ruining my drivetrain, but it's simply what I have to do. It's cheaper than buying XT rear cassettes for sure. The key is to change your chain before you need it, and changing it at 1/32nd of "stretch" is usually a good idea, when it gets towards 1/16th (the next significant increment) you can start to have problems with the cassette and rings.
    Thanks Jm. Glad I'm not losing my mind about the measurement thing
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  10. #10
    contains quinine
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    Back to the original Q

    Here's a different idea about the noise: Did you put different gearing on the bike? Say, from a 11-32 to a 12-34? If you did, the der could be touching the cassette and causing noise.
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  11. #11
    Sublime Absurdity
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debaser
    Here's a different idea about the noise: Did you put different gearing on the bike? Say, from a 11-32 to a 12-34? If you did, the der could be touching the cassette and causing noise.
    oohh - I did! That is a good call - I'll check it out after work and adjust the screw. Thanks to all for the replies!
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  12. #12
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    Good luck!
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  13. #13
    the catalan connection
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    Think logically..........

    Quote Originally Posted by GearHead
    This shouldn't be this complicated but here it goes. The chain pins are rigidly fixed to the outer link plates. If you measure the distance from pin to pin on an outer link of a worn out chain it will still be exactly the same as a brand new chain. Also, if you take an old chain and compare it to a new chain, you will notice that the pins have slop as they move inside the bore of the inner plate ends. It is actually the diameter on the pins being worn smaller and the bore of the inner plate ends being worn larger which causes the chain to lengthen.

    If this is still hard to understand, take a couple links apart on a chain.
    If there was no streching on a chain, the most popular system to measure its replacement time, the ruler measurment from pin to pin, would simply not work.
    "Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordly evidence of the fact." George Elliot

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