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  1. #1
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    my luck with chains...

    so i went to the state park to day, and i took my bike outa the van and rode a few feet...pop! broke my chain. went to walmart quick and got a bike chain repair kit with two extra links and a tool thing, well got there put the link in and rode like 10 feet, well guess what i sheared a link , know the pin that goes thru the links...sheared in 2. so i put the other link there and didn't have a prob;em the rest of the day

  2. #2
    I like Squishy Bikes
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    try a Sram Power Link & stay away from Wally World for bike parts
    A dirty book is rarely dusty

  3. #3
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    At least you didnt bust your knee or roll a nut!
    '97 FSR Ground Control w/ Mountain Speed 6" travel kit, White Bros DH1
    '04 Intense M1 - Dorado
    '98 SE Floval Flyer

  4. #4
    ballbuster
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    srsly

    Quote Originally Posted by Hollis
    try a Sram Power Link & stay away from Wally World for bike parts
    Shimano 9 speed chain (XTR) with a SRAM Powerlink is the shiznit setup. I broke a lot of stuff, but never an XTR chain with SRAM Powerlink.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollis
    ...stay away from Wally World for bike parts
    A buddy of mine called me up the other day...Wal-mart is selling carbon fiber bottle cages now. I got a kick out of that.

  6. #6
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    To understand a part of your problem you need to divide shifting into two eras. Before Hyperglide and after Hyperglide.

    Traditional chains were assembled with a simple press fit holding the outer plates onto the pins, with the pins extending beyond a bit as a safety margin. These could be cut and spliced simply by pushing pins in or out with a chain tool.

    With the advent of gated shifting (Hyperglide, by any name) shifting got easier but the chains were subjected to much greater side force driving the plates outward on the pins. Moreover the pin overhang was now shorter to reduce overall width.

    The solution that made it all possible was to stop depending on the press fit alone to retain the outer plates, but to peen the end of the pin over the plate the way Rosie the Riveter did the rivets on airplanes. Now the plate is positively retained in place by the head of the rivet, which is great, except that you can no longer use the old pushpin type chain tools to close the last link.

    Todays chains can only be spliced by using a specially built link and pin made to greater than average precision for this specific task, or by one of the master links used by Sram and others.

    You also need to note that your shifting habits are also important. If you tend to shift too late and under load, you'll stress the heads of the pins and eventually push the plate over the end. So if you break chains, consider that maybe it isn't the chain, it's you.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  7. #7
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    Let the good times roll with the introduction of the 10sp DT comming from Sram later this summer.

    I was amazed how fragile Shimano 10sp chains are on the road bikes (in most cases from shifting under load) - I can imagine the shops are going to be busy fixing and replacing 10sp chains on the MTB's

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cort
    ..... I was amazed how fragile Shimano 10sp chains are on the road bikes (in most cases from shifting under load) - I can imagine the shops are going to be busy fixing and replacing 10sp chains on the MTB's
    I agree. Unless Shimano can restrict 10s ATB use to those who know how to shift smoothly, the 10s ATB chain business is going to be brisk.

    Bikes have been using the 3/32" chain format for almost 40 years, since the advent of 5 speed. Every few years spacing has gotten narrower to accomodate more gears, yet the inside width of chains is basically the same.

    Early on, much of this width reduction came from outside the chain as the protruding pins were shortened to their current flush length. More recent reductions in overall width are the through thinning the plates. At the same time gated shifting, especially in MTB has increased the strain on chains. I haven't heard of any quantum leaps in the strength of steel lately, so I assume that something will have to give, namely the chains.

    This could be bad news for me, since if chains don't last long enough to get stretched, who'll bother with chain lube.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  9. #9
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    it's a single speed, jist so you know
    ya i haven't got another chain yet but i think i'll order one, but what brand and from where???

  10. #10
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    Clay-
    If you're breaking chains on a singlespeed, either you're the man, or something is seriously wrong.

    Possibly you're running them too tight. Chains aren't guitar strings and there has to be visible slack equal to about 1/8" of "pluck" room at all times. Since chainrings and cogs can be slightly eccentric, check through one complete crank revoltion. Or maybe your chainline is so poor that the chains are trying to run over the sides of the cogs and overstressing.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  11. #11
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    i'm not a wallmartian either.
    yesterday on my crossbike i sucked up a tumbleweed and snapped my der tab, trashed my dura ace der and a couple spokes. suprisingly, the shimano 10speed chain didn't explode. it made for an interesting trail side fix though. i rode a singlespeed back home.

    at the shop my options were either another shimano 10s chain that i would put a scram link in, or a scram pc 1070 hollowpin chain. i went scram, we'll see.

    i wonder how long it will take me to pack all those little holes with crud?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY
    Clay-
    If you're breaking chains on a singlespeed, either you're the man, or something is seriously wrong.

    Possibly you're running them too tight. Chains aren't guitar strings and there has to be visible slack equal to about 1/8" of "pluck" room at all times. Since chainrings and cogs can be slightly eccentric, check through one complete crank revoltion. Or maybe your chainline is so poor that the chains are trying to run over the sides of the cogs and overstressing.
    well looks like i'm the man cuz there's atlest 1/8in slack and the chainrings(front+rear) are inline

  13. #13
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    ya i seen some with hollow pins and i didn't think i wanted one cuz i figered it'd be weak for me and my style

    i really didn't have a choise other then wal mart cuz it's the only place around and i WAS goin ride that day.

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