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  1. #1
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    internal rear hub- + - ?

    I ride a single speed due to the concept of exposed transmission you find on most MTB's. Had one too many rear D's break. But I see the internal gear hubs are coming up and was wondering what you all think of them? I realize it's heavier but the torque should be good and I know that I'm pretty fast on my SS due to the straight chainline and power I can apply to the pedals. My bike is also lighter but I know that will change with the internal gear hub. But I like the safety of the gears the hub offers. Is it a good idea to fool aroind with this system? I know a few german bike companies that are now offering the hub in it's new model hardtails (red bull). What's the deal with these things

  2. #2
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
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    Upsides of the Rohloff: reliable, durable, and did I mention reliable - especially in grungy trail conditions. Downsides: a bit chubby and pricey. But once you own one you're convinced of the merits.

  3. #3
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    I've wanted a Rohloff for some time now. Pricey and the way I ride, I will be out of biking before it pays for itself. There are certainly the merits and the tradeoffs. One thing I do find troublesome about diving in are the frame failures several have had while retrofitting a Rohloff to their rigs, all in the same place. Some companies make their frames for Rohloffs, of course.

    I'll get to try one soon, but there seems to have been a stagnation of refining the designs to move with the times, such as weight. Rohloff has been promising the lighter one forever, but doesn'treally answer much about it. Is it out yet?

    The idea is sound, however.

  4. #4
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    how much does one cost?

  5. #5
    Rohloff
    Reputation: bsdc's Avatar
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    I bought a Rohloff in January. It's a little heavy (about a pound), but I don't notice it on the trails. It grinds a lot when new, but quickly smooths out as it brakes in. It requires a different shifting rhythm/style, but it's easy to pick up and the pluses outway the minuses. It's a conversation piece on the trail. It connects you to the rear wheel like a SS. There's no popping, clicking, ghost shifting, slipping, etc. It makes gear shifts thoughtless. There's no cross chaining to think about. There's no FD rub. There's no thinking about when you need to downshift the FD while upshifting the RD. I find myself thinking about shifting less and enjoying the trials more. It's relatively expensive, but it's durability, low maintenance, and increased joy of riding make it a good investment if you can afford it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdc
    I bought a Rohloff in January. It's a little heavy (about a pound), but I don't notice it on the trails. It grinds a lot when new, but quickly smooths out as it brakes in. It requires a different shifting rhythm/style, but it's easy to pick up and the pluses outway the minuses. It's a conversation piece on the trail. It connects you to the rear wheel like a SS. There's no popping, clicking, ghost shifting, slipping, etc. It makes gear shifts thoughtless. There's no cross chaining to think about. There's no FD rub. There's no thinking about when you need to downshift the FD while upshifting the RD. I find myself thinking about shifting less and enjoying the trials more. It's relatively expensive, but it's durability, low maintenance, and increased joy of riding make it a good investment if you can afford it.
    What he said!

    If you are building a bike from scratch, I would seriously consider it. Especially if you are planning to run high-end hubs and components, then the price differential becomes a little easier to swallow.

    The joy of being able to drop a bunch of gears in a single shift, without pedaling, and having the desired gear engage instantly when you resume pedaling - priceless!

  7. #7
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
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    Do you have a preference for the QR axle over the bolt on axle options when running? I can understand downhillers and free riders wanting a bolt on axle, but if you are doing All Mountain or cross country rides, I'd think the QR feature when you get a flat would be preferable? Opinions and your uses?

  8. #8
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    Reputation: itsdoable's Avatar
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    The TS hub (bolt on) is a bit heavier, I've never read or heard that it was any stronger.

    The bolt on versions were designed to work with track mounts & the Campy slotted dropouts, where you can tension the chain by sliding the wheel for and aft.

    I have both. I carry a 15mm stubby wrench (which works on my fixie & SS hubs too). The nut on the TS axle can be hard to access if you have hooded dropout (sometime called breezer style). If you have issues with the axle shifting in the dropout due to the torque arm (happens under unusual torque arm setups), then the TS bolted hub can be snugged down tighter than most QR skewer.

  9. #9
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
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    The TS version also gives you a little leeway if you have wider-than-normal dropouts.

    But's it's not a true thru-axle (more a "half thru-axle"), so like itsdoable, I don't think it's any stronger.

    In fact, on a QR version the skewer acts as a safety pin of sorts, sandwiching everything together: QRnut - dropout - axle plate - - hub - dropout - qr lever. On the TS version, the axle nuts don't do anything to "press together" the hub: it all relies on the 5 or 6 axle plate bolts, which see both tension and compression forces (though hopefully never sheer).
    speedub.nate
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  10. #10
    Another Retro Grouch
    Reputation: pursuiter's Avatar
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    Are the Rolhoffs 32H only or are there 36H versions?

  11. #11
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter
    Are the Rolhoffs 32H only or are there 36H versions?
    32H only, mainly on account of the 8 bolt pattern that secures the hub cap to the shell. They wouldn't have such an easy time drilling more holes or altering the pattern since it's currently spoke - spoke - bolt repeating on the non-drive side.

    But don't fret none, they symmetrical offset goes a long way towards building a stout wheel. There are pleanty like me who's Speedhubs are serving combat duty on tandems, and with a few exceptions of cracked flanges, they're holding up well.
    speedub.nate
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