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  1. #1
    LUW
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    New question here. Ideal shifting sequence?

    Guys, I have a X7 / X7 / X9 - 210 setup. What would be the ideal shifting sequence?

    Basically this is how I'm shifting:
    • 11
    • 12
    • 13
    • 14
    • 15
    • 16 / 25
    • 26
    • 27
    • 28
    • 29
    • 210

    1 = small chain ring_____1 = 36T cog
    2 = big chain ring_______10 = 11T cog

    As you see, there's a lot of "wasted" gears, but to avoid chain crossing that's basically the sequence I'm doing, going up or going down. Would it be ok to use 24 or 17 or is it better to keep it on the safe side? Would an upgrade in shifters and derailleurs (to X0 or XX) make things safer to use more gear combinations?
    Cheers!
    Luciano
    Brazil
    - 2011 Cannondale Flash Carbon 29er 3

  2. #2
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    As long the chainline is good a double crankset on its own reduces how bad your cross chaining can get versus the inner and outer ring of a triple. Also, modern chains are quite flexible and some say that 10spd chains are even better at handling that kind of bending as well. Based on my experience with 1x9 drivetrains I wouldn't hesitate at all to use the whole cassette from the big ring. 1x7 combo sounds fine to me too.

  3. #3
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    There's no ideal sequence, you adapt the shift sequence to circumstances. Let's say you're in a fairly high gear and come to a short hill you can top in the outer and an inner sprocket. You might decide you're better off shifting the rear only keeping the steps small, even though you'll end up in a less than ideal some crossed combination for a little while.

    Conversely if approaching a very steep climb, you might decide to shift the front early in the process, so you can work your way to the lower gears as you lose momentum and start working harder. If you delay shifting the front you could end up having to shift it under load, and risk dumping the chain.

    Rather than think of a rigid shift sequence, think in terms of a high and low range, and switch when it makes the most sense based on conditions.
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  4. #4
    LUW
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    My fear is chain crossing. Basically, how far can I take it (in terms of gear combinations used) without the risk of ill effects on the rear derailleur?
    Cheers!
    Luciano
    Brazil
    - 2011 Cannondale Flash Carbon 29er 3

  5. #5
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    you can fully cross chain without hurting the rear derailleur, and no a more expensive derailleur will not fare any better. The danger is too much slack in the chain in the small ring, but in my experience your chain will rub on the big ring and get too annoying to bear before that happens (and if you have the right cage length and a properly sized chain it won't ever happen). big/big cross chaining can cause faster wear in your chain, rings and cogs - don't ride all day in that combo, but getting into it momentarily isn't generally going to hurt anything, assuming your chain is long enough.

    On my roadie I use the big ring with cog#2 in your nomenclature all the time, have for years with no ill effects to the derailleur

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    you can fully cross chain without hurting the rear derailleur, and no a more expensive derailleur will not fare any better. The danger is too much slack in the chain in the small ring, but in my experience your chain will rub on the big ring and get too annoying to bear before that happens (and if you have the right cage length and a properly sized chain it won't ever happen). big/big cross chaining can cause faster wear in your chain, rings and cogs - don't ride all day in that combo, but getting into it momentarily isn't generally going to hurt anything, assuming your chain is long enough.

    On my roadie I use the big ring with cog#2 in your nomenclature all the time, have for years with no ill effects to the derailleur
    +1 on all the key points.

    The RD is unaffected by chain cross because it's on the slack lower loop. If the bike is set to spec, you have enough chain length to ride any combination from small/small to big/big, so chain length shouldn't be an issue.

    Chain crossing is only a matter of degree. Each chainring can only be aligned perfectly with only rear sprocket, so almost of your gears involve some chain angle. More angle means faster wear, but who's to say that a short time with a lot of angle is that much worse than all day with less angle.

    Try to ride outer chainring with outer 2/3s of the cassette, inner with the inner 2/3s. Shift your front at the best time for the circumstances, and don't sweat the bike. Smooth well timed shifting is far better than trying to stick to a regime and ending up shifting under load.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by LUW View Post
    My fear is chain crossing. Basically, how far can I take it (in terms of gear combinations used) without the risk of ill effects on the rear derailleur?
    Do most of your shifting on the rear.

    Shift the front when it does not feel "right" and then adjust the rear to get the ratio you want.
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  8. #8
    LUW
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    Good job!

    Saturday I went for a 20 km ride and was more economic with the front chain rings - I used a bit more of the rear sprockets. Used 27 without hearing or feeling no different noises, but with 28 the chain was definitively louder, so I kept to 27 and if needed only then shifted to the small chain ring.

    The big benefit is that going to 27 before shifting the front made me shift less all in all. If I only got to 25 or 26 and then shifted the front to the small chain ring, immediately at the apex of the hump I would have to shift up because the gear got to light. "Extending" a bit the use of the rear gear made me overall shift less.


    I'm not going racing or anything but it's nice to use your equipment to it's full capacity.
    Cheers!
    Luciano
    Brazil
    - 2011 Cannondale Flash Carbon 29er 3

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