Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Cookie Monster
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    62

    Hub bolt how tight?

    So I was going to do a quick check to make sure my back disk break was not loose and needed to take off the outer bolt on the hub to get a tool onto the center lock gizmo that holds the disk on. Tightened the disk up good and went to put the hub bolt back on. Here is where I get confused. When I took the bolt off, I had to turn pretty hard to get it loose, but now if I make the bolt more than finger tight, the bearings bind and the wheel does not spin smoothly. Much scratching of head later, I left the bolt finger tight and went for a very nice night ride. Did I screw up my hub by loosening that bolt? Am I going to screw up my hub riding around like this ? By the way this is an xt hub...if that makes any difference. This is a nice new bike and I don't want to hurt it. Would be greatful for any words of advice on hub bolt torque.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GearHead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,008
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeface
    So I was going to do a quick check to make sure my back disk break was not loose and needed to take off the outer bolt on the hub to get a tool onto the center lock gizmo that holds the disk on. Tightened the disk up good and went to put the hub bolt back on. Here is where I get confused. When I took the bolt off, I had to turn pretty hard to get it loose, but now if I make the bolt more than finger tight, the bearings bind and the wheel does not spin smoothly.
    Your terminolgy is a bit off so lets see if I can follow what you did. You wanted to check the tightness of the lock ring, which holds the rotor onto the hub. To do so you removed the lock nut (jam nut) on the end of the hub axle, tightened the lock ring on the rotor, and replaced the lock nut on the axle.

    If the above is correct, you made a couple of mistakes. The first mistake is you don't need to remove the axle, axle lock nut or anything else to fully remove a ceter lock rotor mounted with a lock ring. The rotor is installed in a similar way that the cassette is installed onto the freehub. The inside diameter of the lock ring removal tool is large enough to go over the axle lock nut as it HAS to by design.

    The second mistake you made was removing the axle lock nut and then trying to reinstall it without removing the rotor completey. You need to set the bearing preload of the hub by adjusting how tight the bearing cone is adjusted against the balls/bearing cup. This is located behind the rotor lock ring and can't be seen with the rotor installed. If you try to tighten the axle lock nut by threading it on further, it will just overload the bearings but will never actually hold the axle tight within the hub.

    The only good thing about this is that the XT hubs don't come with enough grease in them from the factory nor do they have the bearing preload adjusted corectly. Both of these cause these hubs to wear out prematurely and should be fixed anyways.

    To correct your problems, you will need to buy a 15 mm cone wrench, which will be used for holding the cone when tightening all of the axle parts up. Then you will need to remove both the cassette and the rotor, you could just remove the rotor to fix the problem you caused but if you are already in there you might as well fix everything correctly.

    To do all the hub/axle adjustment or to learn how to regrease the hubs, follow these instructions:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/cone-adjustment.html

    Whenever you are using the lock ring removal tool, use a quick release skewer to hold it onto the axle so you don't strip any splines on the tool or the lock rings.

    Quote Originally Posted by bikeface
    Much scratching of head later, I left the bolt finger tight and went for a very nice night ride. Did I screw up my hub by loosening that bolt? Am I going to screw up my hub riding around like this ? By the way this is an xt hub...if that makes any difference. This is a nice new bike and I don't want to hurt it. Would be greatful for any words of advice on hub bolt torque.
    You have not screwed up the hub by loosening any of the parts you did, but you will screw it up pretty quickly if you ride it like that. Fix it immediately before riding it anymore!
    There is no added value to my participation - in fact, just more confusion.

  3. #3
    Cookie Monster
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    62

    Muchas Gracias!

    Hey GearHead,
    Thankyou for the reply. I checked out the link you provided and it's very helpfull. I don't know if I should be doing my own repairs. I might try fixing this, but am tempted to take it in to the LBS. I like to think I am mechanicaly minded, but I seem to screw things up an awful lot. You provided a lot of info, and unless you type really fast, that probly took a while. So thanks for your time in clearing up my confusion. Many happy trails!!

    Thanks,
    Bikeface

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation: standard235's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,556
    Don't worry about messing up your bike.

    Use your brain, don't take shortcuts. I'm 13 and I learned that if you use the right stuff, things turn out to be much easier than I expected.

  5. #5
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    17,516
    Quote Originally Posted by standard235
    Don't worry about messing up your bike.

    Use your brain, don't take shortcuts. I'm 13 and I learned that if you use the right stuff, things turn out to be much easier than I expected.
    Is that why you spent 2 grand on a Fuji and a Hardrock?

    Yeah, do things right the first time, or it'll come back to bite you in the @ss.

  6. #6
    Cookie Monster
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    62

    I did it!

    Quote Originally Posted by standard235
    Don't worry about messing up your bike.

    Use your brain, don't take shortcuts. I'm 13 and I learned that if you use the right stuff, things turn out to be much easier than I expected.
    I got the right tools and things went smoothly and now things roll smoothly!! You gotta love it when your wheels spin nice.
    Thanks all for the advice.

    Bikeface

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GearHead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,008
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeface
    I got the right tools and things went smoothly and now things roll smoothly!! You gotta love it when your wheels spin nice.
    Thanks all for the advice.

    Bikeface
    Glad to hear that everything worked out for you! Just remeber that if you think you can't fix something on your bike, don't believe for a minute that the kid in the back of the LBS is going to do any better. If you have nice equipment, it is better to buy the tools and learn to wrench on it yourself. It will be much cheaper and better repaired in the long run.

    Whenever you have a question the people on MTBR will be glad to help you, maybe just take a quick look at www.SheldonBrown.com and www.parktool.com websites to brush up on the basics and terminology first.
    There is no added value to my participation - in fact, just more confusion.

  8. #8
    Carpe Noctem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    311
    Quote Originally Posted by GearHead
    Glad to hear that everything worked out for you! Just remeber that if you think you can't fix something on your bike, don't believe for a minute that the kid in the back of the LBS is going to do any better. If you have nice equipment, it is better to buy the tools and learn to wrench on it yourself. It will be much cheaper and better repaired in the long run.

    Whenever you have a question the people on MTBR will be glad to help you, maybe just take a quick look at www.SheldonBrown.com and www.parktool.com websites to brush up on the basics and terminology first.
    I work in an LBS, I'm not a kid, I am trained, certified and subject to nearly constant quality control by Barnett certified techs. I take pride in doing top quality work. Part of me is offended that the negative stereotype is applied to all shops without any research or so much as a second thought. Another part of me is glad you're working on your own stuff and telling people you don't know to do the same. Job security is a nice thing to have.
    Off season? What off season?

  9. #9
    banned
    Reputation: standard235's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,556
    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Is that why you spent 2 grand on a Fuji and a Hardrock?

    Yeah, do things right the first time, or it'll come back to bite you in the @ss.

    Ding ding, we have a winner.

  10. #10
    Wolf nipple chips
    Reputation: Cabin Fever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    503
    Quote Originally Posted by OnTheMoment
    I work in an LBS, I'm not a kid, I am trained, certified and subject to nearly constant quality control by Barnett certified techs. I take pride in doing top quality work. Part of me is offended that the negative stereotype is applied to all shops without any research or so much as a second thought. Another part of me is glad you're working on your own stuff and telling people you don't know to do the same. Job security is a nice thing to have.

    i second that. I've seen many people bring in their wheel to get my shop to repair their hub that they took apart and now they can't re-assemble it. so we fix it for them. heaven forbid that we charge them for a service that we provide that gets the job done right!

    Granted, not all shops are created equal. but any shop that is spitting out incorrectly done repairs won't be in business for long - especially if there is other competition in town.

    CF

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by OnTheMoment
    I work in an LBS, I'm not a kid, I am trained, certified and subject to nearly constant quality control by Barnett certified techs. I take pride in doing top quality work. Part of me is offended that the negative stereotype is applied to all shops without any research or so much as a second thought. Another part of me is glad you're working on your own stuff and telling people you don't know to do the same. Job security is a nice thing to have.
    TAKE IT E-Zee... If you take pride in your work as stated,
    .........................your reputation creates security!

    .................................................. ................PEACE.....

  12. #12
    Carpe Noctem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    311
    Quote Originally Posted by NB GAS 350
    TAKE IT E-Zee... If you take pride in your work as stated,
    .........................your reputation creates security!

    .................................................. ................PEACE.....

    Yeah, it's not like my profession has been insulted or it pays the bills or it's a point of pride or anything.
    Off season? What off season?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •