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  1. #1
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    high and low--normal, that is

    I have "low normal" derailleurs on my bikes. I call it Rapid Rise (and I like the shifting, but that's another thread). Would someone please tell me why RR is "low normal" and Not-RR is called "high normal"? I myself would call Not-RR "regular shifting" and RR, well, Rapid Rise, which is how it was described in the beginning (you know, back in the 90s). You gotta call everything something, but the derivation of this particular terminology escapes me. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Its called low normal because it normally rests on the low gears (big cogs). Why is it called rapid rise? I don't know, ask Shimano's marketing people. I guess because it naturally rises by itself to the tall cogs.

  3. #3
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    dont all rear derailleurs rest on the low gears? or is that just me

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ANdRewLIu6294
    dont all rear derailleurs rest on the low gears? or is that just me
    No, the high normal models rest in the small (high) gears.

  5. #5
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    Since high normal was the original "normal" the moniker "low normal" came about as a result, marketing folks love stuff like that, and after a while making as much sense as "clipless" pedals do now...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    , and after a while making as much sense as "clipless" pedals do now...
    hah! yeah thats one of my favorites to explain to rookies. Why do you "clip" in to "clipless" pedals?

  7. #7
    meh....
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    You have Rapid-Rise, the other is called Rapid-Fire.

    Monte

  8. #8
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    it's the "normal" that really throws me

    I guess the word "normal" is what's so confusing, unless "normal" means something else in bikology terms that I'm not aware of. The way I see it, "normal" means what has pretty much been the way something's been done for a long time. The manner in which derailleurs shifted before Rapid Rise ever came out would be "normal". For me now Rapid Rise is "normal" but that's just because I've used it for 7 years and got used to it in five minutes. Non-rapidrise shifting really is "normal" to the vast majority of riders. So what the heck does "High" and "Low" got to do with shifting or "normal"? The cog that a chain rest on in back is either your 34 or on down to the 12 depending on the terrain. There's no "normal" place your chain is gonna rest for any length of time. All that said, in my business things get called something for no apparent reason than you gotta call it something, so just memorize what it's called and get on with your life.

    If anything these two derailleurs should be called "normal" and "non-normal" (or "abnormal!"

  9. #9
    hands up who wants to die
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    I don't think that "normal" in this case is a subjective term for popularity or standard usage.

    "Normal" simply means the orientation of the derailleur cage when the spring is at rest (not being stretched via the shifter cable or your hand or whatever). A high-normal derailleur sits at the high gear of the cassette when the shifter cable is not acting on it; a low-normal derailleur sits at the low gear in the same scenario.

    Low-normal is the new standard for Shimano's MTB ders and their low-end "comfort bike" ders. SRAM only makes high-normal derailleurs. All road ders are high-normal.

    "Rapid Rise" is Shimano's fancy marketing term for a low-normal derailleur design, the concept for which is not their invention.

    -r

  10. #10
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    "Normal" reflects the spring action on the derailleur. The derailleur needs no spring tension to rest on the low gears - hence the low normal moniker. In other words, "normal" reflects the "state" of the derailleur in the normal (no tension) mode. That happens to be in the lowest gears for a LOW NORMAL setup.

    Rapid Rise is the real silly name in my opinion. The "rise" or the shift is more automatic than rapid. In fact, it is not as rapid as it could be since the shift itself is governed by the derailleur mechanics. Another way to put it: you cannot force a up-shift until the derailler is good and ready.
    My rides:
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monte
    You have Rapid-Rise, the other is called Rapid-Fire.

    Monte
    Rapidfire is Shimano's marketing buzzword for their traditional trigger shifter system. has nothing to do with the derrailleur. You can use a rapidfire shifter with low or high normal derailleurs.

  12. #12
    mechmann_mtb
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    i have over heard people call the RR RD "rapid Demise"


    is there an inherent problem with these RDs that i should be aware of? i just purchased an XT short cage RD to replace my long cage XTR (don't need the long cage because i went 1x9) and it is "rapid demise"


    if there is going to be a big problem, i might consider trying to find a high-normal RD...

  13. #13
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    How about explaining "saddle" mounts on a seatpost?
    It's only pain......

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechmann_mtb
    i have over heard people call the RR RD "rapid Demise"


    is there an inherent problem with these RDs that i should be aware of? i just purchased an XT short cage RD to replace my long cage XTR (don't need the long cage because i went 1x9) and it is "rapid demise"


    if there is going to be a big problem, i might consider trying to find a high-normal RD...
    There's nothing wrong with it. Some people just don't like it and like to make a lot of fuss about it. The majority of people who try them do like it and its been one of MTBR's best ever reviewed derailleurs

  15. #15
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    is rapid-rise a bad thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hecubus
    There's nothing wrong with it. Some people just don't like it and like to make a lot of fuss about it. The majority of people who try them do like it and its been one of MTBR's best ever reviewed derailleurs
    No, no, a thousand times no! I've been moving from a sold house to an apartment and have been away from email for three days. Whew, back online! No, rapid-rise is not a bad thing, my two bikes shift perfectly with this "abnormal" action at the rear of my bike. It's intuitive, for me, and I never miss a shift. It's all just personal preference, IMHO. If you don't like it, for your own reasons, you probably hate it. That said, anytime I ride a "regular" shifting derailleur, it takes me a few minutes to remember how to activate it and I'm shifting just like I did pre-1998. Do I hate that "regular" shifting? Not at all, I just prefer the rapid rise.

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