Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    3

    Here we go again: SRAM vs SHIMANO

    Out of the high-end...who really makes the best drive train?

    How do they compare on aftermarket crank-sets?

    Do you like the shifters for each as well?

    Thanks for your time!

    Dallas21

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    173

    This never goes anywhere constuctive.

    However.

    They both make top notch gear. Both have their (very) small advantages and disadvantages. Otherwise its down to personal preference and bias.

    I'd be happy with either.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: iattackthedarkness's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    247

    one word...

    Suntour

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wXman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    302
    Actually...I think there are a couple advantages that Shimano has-

    Chains: I've used both Shimano XT level and XTR level chains, as well as PC69 and PC59's from SRAM. Each type I've put many many miles on in various riding conditions. I have NEVER had a Shimano Chain break....and I have broken several SRAM's. Everyone of the SRAM's twisted too and usually broke near the twisted portion of the chain. This really bugs me because I love the ease of working on a SRAM chain with its power link, but had to return to shimano because of the durability issue. I don't know for sure, but suspect that the power link somehow weakens the SRAM chains

    Cogsets: No issues with durability...only with layout. Both sell an 11-34 casette, but why SRAM chooses such a big drop from the 34 tooth cog is beyond me. Shimano's 34- 32 (I think) change is perfect for most of my riding as I'm almost always in 2/1 or 2/2 while climbing. When I've had the SRAM back there its sometimes really tough to ride 2/2 because they drop from like 34 to 28 or so...(not sure of exact tooth count, but its a much bigger drop) Guess if I was to ride that all the time I'd be in better shape ;-) Of course - If I just got a SS and rode that all the time...that'd be even better...but then we wouldn't be havin' this discussion anyhow.....:-P

    SRAM blows shimano away in the D-railer and Shifter department...IMO. I wouldn't trade my X0 RD or shifters for any triggers made by anyone. They are simple, accurate, and easy to tune. The XO RD is a thing of beauty.
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing." - Helen Keller

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Vecsus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,812
    I will second the endorsement on the SRAM shifter/derailleur combo. Much easier to install and tune. Much more tolerant of mud and gunk. Quieter. I also find the shfting much more positive. With shimano there was a tiny delay, along with the chain rattle that makes you wonder if things are working properly. When I shift with my X.9 setup the only way i can tell that the chain moved is in the force it takes to pedal...there is no sound. When my X.9 RD fails, I'll bump up to a X0..but i think I'll have to wait a while.

  6. #6
    Live 2 Ride
    Reputation: Kona0197's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,839
    Well after reading all the threads about broken SRAM rear derailluers I will stick to Shimano. After all - I've beat the crap out of my Shimano stuff and it dosen't break.
    My Bike: '03 Specialized HardRock FrankenBike
    My Blog: http://http://kona0197.wordpress.com/

  7. #7
    Village Dirtbag
    Reputation: @dam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,274
    I realize that Shimano is big and evil, but most of their stuff just plain works well. My whole bike is LX/XT, with no SRAM part other than a powerlink on my XTR chain. I'm not a fan of dual control or rapid rise though.

    The trigger shifters just feel so smooth and ergonomic, while the SRAM triggers feel like Shimano's old original Rapidfire I "push push" shifters fromt he early 90's.

    Shimano has a lot of experience with drivetrains, and they just do it well. It all tends to be very smooth and reliable. SRAM is definitely getting into the same ballpark though, but they still aren't quite there on smoothness and durability. I wouldn't mind supporting SRAM though, so maybe they'll be better than Shimano in a couple of years and I'll give 'em a try.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wXman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    302

    On the other hand.....

    Adam

    I maintain five bikes (wife, two kids, and my two rigs) and have literally put 1000's of mi on all different sorts of said equipment over the past five to six years of serious riding. My boys are very rough on their gear and really test a product's reliability. I agree with you Shimano makes quality and knows a lot about drivetrains....but SRAM's top end stuff is definately "there" both in shifters and RD's - they are NOT 2 years or so away. Their chains are suspect IMO...as I have broke several of them and have NEVER broken a shimano chain....don't know if that's related to the powerlink or what.

    What I hate is that Shimano is kinda like Schwinn used to be in the 60's. They have "enviable market share" (commonly called a monopoly) and they take advantage of that in less than agreeable ways at times, by making stuff out of standard or proprietary. Their way of getting you to buy a package deal across their product line. Smart bussiness? Sure! But not the most customer friendly.....

    See this link for what I'm talking about :

    Shame on you Shimano!

    Whenever a company forces me to buy something......or dictates my choices...they're the last company I want to do business with.
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing." - Helen Keller

  9. #9
    Village Dirtbag
    Reputation: @dam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,274
    I know I know. That was the "big & evil" part of my post. I don't run any of their integrated stuff (e.g. dual control), but my XT casette could be a touch tighter on my DT Swiss Onyx rear hub..

    I wouldn't know about XTR or X.0 stuff, 'cause they're both too damned expensive. SRAM really doesn't seem to be any better than Shimano value wise.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,791
    Both...

    Cassette spacing does seem nicer with Shimano.

    I've recently installed X7 triggers and I like the ability to run the brake levers inboard (less cramped index finger setup), and shift up with thumbs while braking.

    The short housing on SRAM X.x deraillers is a nice touch, but I got lots of miles out of the previous XT derailler so...

  11. #11
    Shot Down in Flames...
    Reputation: D-Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,223
    Quote Originally Posted by wXman
    Chains: I've used both Shimano XT level and XTR level chains, as well as PC69 and PC59's from SRAM. Each type I've put many many miles on in various riding conditions. I have NEVER had a Shimano Chain break....and I have broken several SRAM's. Everyone of the SRAM's twisted too and usually broke near the twisted portion of the chain. This really bugs me because I love the ease of working on a SRAM chain with its power link, but had to return to shimano because of the durability issue. I don't know for sure, but suspect that the power link somehow weakens the SRAM chains.
    Wow, I have had the exact opposite happen. I used to break shimano chains often, I switched to Sachs because of it. I have never broken a Sachs/SRAM chain in over 6 years.

    I also agree about the 11-34 cassette spacing.

    The set-up on my main bike is X.0 RD & shifters, XT 761 FD, PC-99, XT 11-34, RF Deus and It absolutely is the best shifting set-up I have ever had.

    D.

  12. #12
    Gravity Rides Everything
    Reputation: endurowanker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,127
    Quote Originally Posted by wXman
    Actually...I think there are a couple advantages that Shimano has-

    Chains: I've used both Shimano XT level and XTR level chains, as well as PC69 and PC59's from SRAM. Each type I've put many many miles on in various riding conditions. I have NEVER had a Shimano Chain break....and I have broken several SRAM's. Everyone of the SRAM's twisted too and usually broke near the twisted portion of the chain. This really bugs me because I love the ease of working on a SRAM chain with its power link, but had to return to shimano because of the durability issue. I don't know for sure, but suspect that the power link somehow weakens the SRAM chains
    .

    i got some good news for you buddy...

    you can use a quick link on a shimano 9 speed chain. i've been doing it for over a month now. good stuff you can't use a quick link on shimano 8 speed chains.

    most people seem to prefer SRAM chains. I've broken a sram 8 speed chain, and a shimano 9 speed chain in my day. I dunno what to think.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wXman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    302
    well..

    I don't know what it is...but I've never broken one and I've broke several SRAMS. What is weird...is they've all been twisted before they broke. Part of that is probably because my bike likes to drop the chain on DH runs, sometimes at the worst of times causing some serious mechanical discord...if you catch my drift. I think the Shimano chains are slightly (and we're talking hairs here) stiffer and don't twist as easy for some reason. Maybe the way the pins are peened? IDK.....*shrugs*

    Believe me...I WANT to ride SRAM. I like the Quicklink, I like the company...and I'm NOT fond of Microsoft....I mean $hitmano :-P. If they worked for me, I'd be riding them. I just hate "issues" on the trail. Don't like trail side repairs, kinda ruins that flow..ya' know?
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing." - Helen Keller

  14. #14
    Jm.
    Jm. is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jm.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,137
    Quote Originally Posted by wXman
    well..

    I don't know what it is...but I've never broken one and I've broke several SRAMS. What is weird...is they've all been twisted before they broke. Part of that is probably because my bike likes to drop the chain on DH runs, sometimes at the worst of times causing some serious mechanical discord...if you catch my drift. I think the Shimano chains are slightly (and we're talking hairs here) stiffer and don't twist as easy for some reason. Maybe the way the pins are peened? IDK.....*shrugs*
    The higher end shimano chains use "mushroom" shapped pins, this makes it very hard and almost impossible for a link to ever slide off the pin. Most people that said they "broke shimano chains" are talking about a different (older) generation of shimano chains. The only problem with the shimano ones is that you have to use the special "connector pin" any time you put the chain together. This is a small price to pay for the kind of strength these things have though IMO. Shimano XTR/Dura Ace CN7701 chains are about $30, the same weight as the sram pc99 hollow pin, and durability is much better IMO. I've never broken one.

    Sram (sachs actually) chains were better back in the day when the shimano chains were sub par, but that is not the case anymore.
    I know in my heart that Ellsworth bikes are more durable by as much as double. AND they are all lighter...Tony Ellsworth

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    32
    Since I started biking, I have had used Sram chain and casette. PC 59, 69, and 99 (not hollow pin). Last week, I tried Shimano 7701 because it's cheaper. I used the power link of Sram instead of special pin and it's working no problem.

    My impression is that I like Shimano chain better. The way it feels to me is that Shimano shifts much smoother. Sometimes, I don't even feel that it change already. Also. it engages much faster than SRAM. A quarter turn of cranks and the chain already engages while SRAM takes a quarter to half turn.

    Bottom line is go with the price. You can't go wrong in either one. Each brand has its pros and cons.

Similar Threads

  1. New to the sport, need bike :)
    By iLLestOne in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-13-2005, 06:28 AM
  2. Shimano XT vs. Shimano XTR vs. SRAM X.7 vs SRAM X.9
    By bullit71 in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-08-2005, 09:25 PM
  3. sram or shimano???
    By Jacques12345 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-21-2004, 12:43 PM
  4. SRAM X.9 shifter/ XO R. Der. vs Shimano
    By Manny Omega in forum SRAM
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-15-2004, 01:39 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •