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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: lamp no 3's Avatar
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    Listen! Help with degreasing chain = rust

    I had an 8 spd KMC chain : The problem

    I disconnect the chain using the chain breaker and stick the chain in a water bottle filled with

    -super clean biodegradeable citrus degreaser
    -soap and water


    I shake the thing up, repeat again, and then comes to the point where the chain has suds on it, and I need to wash it off. I wash the chain off with a slow stream water hose, then dry it with compressed air+towels and hot sunlight.I put some oil on right away, and then the next day I saw rust on the chain,

    Question: How can I prevent the rust so I don't mess up the new chain I have, which anyways is caked with mud? thanks!
    26'er GT Avalanche 3.0 Disc singlespeed oh yeah...

    Why is adjusting derailleurs like rocket science to me?

  2. #2
    meh....
    Reputation: Monte's Avatar
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    use a hair dryer, you're not getting all the water off. heat the chain up.

  3. #3
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    thanks man!
    26'er GT Avalanche 3.0 Disc singlespeed oh yeah...

    Why is adjusting derailleurs like rocket science to me?

  4. #4
    Rip Van Winkle
    Reputation: Restoman's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure someone on here said put it in the oven to get all of the water off. I would use a heat lamp myself.

  5. #5
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    Drying the chain completely in an oven or using a hair dryer is absolutely critical. Water wicks into the channels within the chain, and will stay there long after the outside is dry, unless forced out with heat. With the channels full, the oil you apply stays on the outside, doing you little good.

    You should also be aware that citrus degreaser is slightly acidic, especially when mixed with water. Add some baking soda to your rinse water to offset this, or use non-citrus detergents when cleaning your chain.
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  6. #6
    Rip Van Winkle
    Reputation: Restoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY
    Drying the chain completely in an oven or using a hair dryer is absolutely critical. Water wicks into the channels within the chain, and will stay there long after the outside is dry, unless forced out with heat. With the channels full, the oil you apply stays on the outside, doing you little good.

    You should also be aware that citrus degreaser is slightly acidic, especially when mixed with water. Add some baking soda to your rinse water to offset this, or use non-citrus detergents when cleaning your chain.

    Good, now I know I'm not crazy.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Restoman
    Good, now I know I'm not crazy.
    Don't let anything I've said here lead you to jump to conclusions on that score.
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  8. #8
    It's about showing up.
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    This is what WD-40 is for

    Spray it on and leave overnight to drive water out of the chain. Then lube with your normal lube.

    WD-40 is not a lubricant for bikes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike
    Spray it on and leave overnight to drive water out of the chain. Then lube with your normal lube.

    WD-40 is not a lubricant for bikes.
    "there was an old lady who swallowed a fly,......

    You're just changing one problem into another. Even if you leave it overnight, there'll still be WD-40 inside the chain, so your lube either won't penetrate effectively, or will be diluted with WD-40 and weep out while you ride.

    If you've removed the chain to water wash it, what could be easier than drying it in an oven? Quick and effective and doesn't involve buying any other product, or introducing still more chemicals to the wasrtestream, or air.

    For those who wash on the bike, mineral spirits may be a better choice, but if you water wash, it takes less than 10 minutes to dry with a decent hair dryer. Orient the it so the blast runs the length of either the upper or lower loop of chain, so more of it's output is used vs. blowing it across the chain.

    When you're done, relube a dry chain and your lube will penetrate to the core and do it's job properly.
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  10. #10
    g3h6o3
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    Hey, that's me. I broil it in the oven!

    Quote Originally Posted by Restoman
    I'm pretty sure someone on here said put it in the oven to get all of the water off. I would use a heat lamp myself.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  11. #11
    It's about showing up.
    Reputation: Berkeley Mike's Avatar
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    We disagree

    [QUOTE=FBinNY][I]
    "You're just changing one problem into another. Even if you leave it overnight, there'll still be WD-40 inside the chain, so your lube either won't penetrate effectively, or will be diluted with WD-40 and weep out while you ride."

    My method has worked just fine for nearly 18 years. I think your sense that it will keep lube from penetrating is mistaken. We ride in pretty sloppy situations routinely as we ride all year around. Much of our mud just sucks the life out of any lube and when it dries it is like concrete. So, no matter how late or hammered we are after post ride burgers and beers the bikes get hosed off when we get home, bounced up and down to shake off the excess water and WD-40 goes on all moving parts.

    Next morning the bikes may not be pretty but the chains are not rusty. Then we relube. My bikes and the team bikes hold up very well. It is hard to argue with such results.

    FWIW we have started deep lubing chains with heavy lubes, like the Rohloff lube and this is working very well for sloppy conditions and dusty conditions.
    Last edited by Berkeley Mike; 07-14-2009 at 08:40 PM.

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