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  1. #1
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    Front derailleur angle?

    When installing or adjusting a front derailleur, should it be exactly parallel to the front sprockets or is there some sort of shifting advantage of having it slightly angled out/inward in relation to the front sprockets?

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    Individual bikes are different in whether or not you gain any clearance advantage from deviating from the "parallel to the outer chainring" rule, especially with full suspension bikes. The shift plates are very manipulated shapes and some fullies cause the chain to sag in certain spots which cause more rub than with others. A slight rotation of the f der can affect this rub. Of course the chain will also sit in a different spot in the cage once the rider is on board and the bike sags, so it is hard to judge.

    Basically you should be able to get good shifting using the general rule. I would only experiment with rotating the der if you want to affect a specific change.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
    ...idios...
    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    Having everything parallel keeps it all equal. For example, any upshifting advantage you may get from angling the derailleur out-over, will more than likely translate to a disadvantage in downshifting. Of course, it depends on which combination of chainrings you use, but I'd imagine that for most applications having the cage parallel to the rings is the ideal position.
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  4. #4
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    I find it's usually much more difficult and slower to shift to a larger front gear and was just sort of wondering what angle, if any, is best to aid the chain for that.

  5. #5
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    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    "I find it's usually much more difficult and slower to shift to a larger front gear and was just sort of wondering what angle, if any, is best to aid the chain for that."

    A parallel derailleur which is at the ideal height in relation to the rings will most likely work best. Shifting to a bigger ring is always going to be more difficult than to smaller ring because you need to apply pressure rather than release it. If you're finding it unusually difficult, it may be worth checking the cables to make sure they're not sticking somewhere along the line and also that the derailleur itself is free from muck/grime.

    Edit. I've just looked at the pictures in your profile. Is the problem you're having happening on the red Yeti in the pictures? I'm not sure that the cable is correctly routed through the derailleur.
    Last edited by SteveUK; 04-09-2007 at 03:05 PM.

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