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  1. #1
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    Fastest way to rail chain?

    You're on a (not too steep) climb of your favorite trail. You want to beat your best time. And suddenly, your pedals spin out with a clunk. You look down and there the chain is, between the shell and granny ring, sucked for some unknown reason.

    Assuming that the chain didn't get totally wedged in there, what would be the fastest way to rail the chain back on?

    I tried shifting to 2nd chain ring and pedaling, but that was stupid and just wedged the chain in there. The chain wouldn't catch. It was too big of a jump. What would you guys do? The most reliable way I know is to rip off your gloves and be a human derailer. Prolly take a while longer, but at least it works.

    Edit: thx for moving this thread. It started out as sort of a wrenching thing but quickly changed subjects. Haha
    Last edited by sauprankul; 11-14-2012 at 10:52 PM.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
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    My very first reaction is to grab my phone...and pause my Mountain Bike Riding app that records my time and milage. I then proceed to pry and kick my chainring and foward derailer. I really, really, really hate that derailer. Once the chain is free. I pull the chain from the button freeing up some slack and on to my middle chaining. Then resume my bike ridding app. I actually set a new time record that day. I have since beat that record.

  3. #3
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    1x10 with a chain guide here....my answer is ride past you with my chain still on my ring.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikebmx999 View Post
    1x10 with a chain guide here....my answer is ride past you with my chain still on my ring.
    Ya ya, it's on my to do list but in the mean time I've ordered a chain guide to help.

  5. #5
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    I'm thinking of converting from my 3 x 8 setup to 1 x 8.
    I REALLY don't use my 2nd and 3rd chain ring unless I'm concerned about chain line.
    So can I just take off my 3x and 4x rings and move my 2x ring to the center? Do I need a chain guide or a special crank or a special ring?

    Once I get into shape I can switch to my 3x ring.

    Edit: never mind. There's no point in running 1 x n unguided. Its worse than 3 x n. I think I'll stick with my triple until $$ is less of a concern. Plus I would need to get Ss specific chain ring bolts...
    Last edited by sauprankul; 11-13-2012 at 11:14 PM.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  6. #6
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    You can remove the outer and inner rings and then you'd need something to hold it all on. The cheapest route would be an N gear jump stop and a bbg bash guard for the outside.

    Or grind down your bolts and buy a seat tube or bb mounted guide like an mrp 1x.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 50calray View Post
    Ya ya, it's on my to do list but in the mean time I've ordered a chain guide to help.
    If it makes you feel better I'd ask if everything was ok


    What kind of guide?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikebmx999 View Post
    1x10 with a chain guide here....my answer is ride past you with my chain still on my ring.

    properly adjusted 2x here. I do the same thing.

  9. #9
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    Fastest way? stomp on the right side pedal backwards (that is, backpedal). Good chance of damaging something that way, but if you're hurt for time, there it is.

    Now, assuming it just dropped, and you didn't try to pedal it out, back pedaling can remove it, and some finesse with the derailleur can get it back on the ring.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    You're on a (not too steep) climb of your favorite trail. You want to beat your best time. And suddenly, your pedals spin out with a clunk. You look down and there the chain is, between the shell and granny ring, sucked for some unknown reason.

    Assuming that the chain didn't get totally wedged in there, what would be the fastest way to rail the chain back on?

    I tried shifting to 2nd chain ring and pedaling, but that was stupid and just wedged the chain in there. The chain wouldn't catch. It was too big of a jump. What would you guys do? The most reliable way I know is to rip off your gloves and be a human derailer. Prolly take a while longer, but at least it works.
    Properly adjust your drivetrain so you do not drop the chain in the first place.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    You're on a (not too steep) climb of your favorite trail. You want to beat your best time. And suddenly, your pedals spin out with a clunk. You look down and there the chain is, between the shell and granny ring, sucked for some unknown reason.

    Assuming that the chain didn't get totally wedged in there, what would be the fastest way to rail the chain back on?

    I tried shifting to 2nd chain ring and pedaling, but that was stupid and just wedged the chain in there. The chain wouldn't catch. It was too big of a jump. What would you guys do? The most reliable way I know is to rip off your gloves and be a human derailer. Prolly take a while longer, but at least it works.
    In that situation you are best off to jump off, grab the chain and loop it back on the granny ring....and you won't be beating your best time

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Properly adjust your drivetrain so you do not drop the chain in the first place.
    Oh, snap. But true.

    On my 'cross bike, I also use a chain watcher despite having (I like to think) a correctly adjusted drivetrain. It makes up for the occasional less-than-graceful putting the bike down after barriers.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Properly adjust your drivetrain so you do not drop the chain in the first place.
    You're right. I do meticulously tend to my bike, but it constantly surprises me that my front mech is the part that needs the most maintenance. It's the coarsest part of the bike, yet the most finicky too.

    I find both cable tension and limit screws going out of tune after every off road ride.
    Acera.... nuff said.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  14. #14
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    Front derailleurs suck

  15. #15
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    Going from Acera to SLX made a big difference in the reliability of my drivetrain. I think there's a big change at Deore - I actually have a spare Deore FD sitting on my shelf and it looks pretty solid and the graphic is the only visible change from Acera. But Acera and down are definitely a lesser product.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    Hi guys. I tried using only my 2nd chain ring (32 I believe) with my 8 speed rear, and, to me, that seemed like a whack chain line. Is that safe? It was more exaggerated on my 32 sprocket than my 11 sprocket. Does that mean I have to get a dedicated single ring crank and nothing else?

    This is gonna be long...
    I was going to try making a bashwich by moving my chain rings around. But sadly, my crank is so crappy that it uses riveted rings.
    I've been eyeing the race face ride or evolve cranksets for a while before this. I notice that there is an SS version of the evolve available. It comes with a bash too. By SS do they mean it isn't suitable for a multi speed drive train? Or does that just mean it is a crank with one ring?

  17. #17
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    Buy a new bike.

    Alternatively, live with what you've got until you wear out the rings. Then you'll probably have thrashed enough stuff that you're due for a new bike anyway.

    Maybe there's an exception out there that someone will bring up and make me look silly. But in general, bikes that come with riveted chainrings have parts of similar lifespan and capability everywhere else on the bike. By the time you've replaced everything, you'll have paid for a pretty nice bike, but you won't have one.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    OK
    You're right. I need somebody to keep me from upgrading my bike. Instead, I'll put away some money for a real bike.

  19. #19
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    What on earth are you doing in granny on a 'not too steep' climb???
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRandall View Post
    What on earth are you doing in granny on a 'not too steep' climb???
    Hmmm I thought I already replied to this. Anyway, you're right. I made up the scenario for conversations sake. I just had in mind that if you we're on a "too" steep climb, then you would have no option but to get off and pull your chain back on.

    Next: I usually go 1 x 1-4, 2 x 4-6, and 3 x 6-8.
    I only use my 48t chainring for road. But my paranoid shifting results in me having either a very high gear or a pretty low gear. I tried out 38t chainring with my 32t sprocket and the chain line didn't look too bad. I think the only thing scaring me was the rubbing fd.
    Hehe I just looked up my crankset gearing yesterday and its 28/38/48. Not the best mtb gearing. I'll prolly try some more combinations now that I know the chain line doesn't get too whacky. But I don't think I can make all the climbs I have to with the 38t chainring. I'll try to wear this current crank out quickly! That way I can get something with better gearing haha.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRandall View Post
    What on earth are you doing in granny on a 'not too steep' climb???
    One of the more obvious explantions is having just finished the granny climb the hill continues at a "not too steep" angle.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    Hmmm I thought I already replied to this. Anyway, you're right. I made up the scenario for conversations sake. I just had in mind that if you we're on a "too" steep climb, then you would have no option but to get off and pull your chain back on.

    Next: I usually go 1 x 1-4, 2 x 4-6, and 3 x 6-8.
    I only use my 48t chainring for road. But my paranoid shifting results in me having either a very high gear or a pretty low gear. I tried out 38t chainring with my 32t sprocket and the chain line didn't look too bad. I think the only thing scaring me was the rubbing fd.
    Hehe I just looked up my crankset gearing yesterday and its 28/38/48. Not the best mtb gearing. I'll prolly try some more combinations now that I know the chain line doesn't get too whacky. But I don't think I can make all the climbs I have to with the 38t chainring. I'll try to wear this current crank out quickly! That way I can get something with better gearing haha.
    Get over the fear of cross-chaining ......Sometimes it is the cat's ass...

    For example you ride down into a steep gully in big ring and a small ring on the back....the gully then goes right back up.....with no time to drop to second ring, and/or risk a chain fall....

    So grab and handfull on the rear and power up the other side....cross chained works great and only lasts for several pedal strokes.

    BTW I run a 46 34 22 1-34.....I run in the big ring lots on the trails.

  23. #23
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    OP, your granny is bigger than most riders' grannies, even a lot (most?) of the guys doing 2x10. Don't worry about the internet chest-beating about not using grannies for moderate climbs - your middle ring is a lot bigger than the middle rings of those riders, and I suspect a lot are either lying or haven't developed their cadence.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    OP, your granny is bigger than most riders' grannies, even a lot (most?) of the guys doing 2x10. Don't worry about the internet chest-beating about not using grannies for moderate climbs - your middle ring is a lot bigger than the middle rings of those riders, and I suspect a lot are either lying or haven't developed their cadence.
    I think my crankset has the superman gearing because it is meant for hybrids/road. I think that will seriously need to go because on the product website, nowhere does it suggest that the product is meant for MTBing!
    I'm still eyeing the race face cranksets. How long does it usually take to wear out the rings on a crappy $40 crank with about 4 to 5 hrs of riding a week? Then I'll have an excuse to upgrade.

    About 2 x 10, is the norm to drop the granny or the big ring from the triple? I would assume that you would exchange that high speed ring for the bash. That way, your bike is better suited for slower, trickier stuff.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  25. #25
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  26. #26
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    Harshing my mellow Switch

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    OP, your granny is bigger than most riders' grannies
    Dag! That's kind of harsh there to all of is that had small grannies; I mean, yeah my granny was small, but she had a big heart.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    I think my crankset has the superman gearing because it is meant for hybrids/road. I think that will seriously need to go because on the product website, nowhere does it suggest that the product is meant for MTBing!
    I'm still eyeing the race face cranksets. How long does it usually take to wear out the rings on a crappy $40 crank with about 4 to 5 hrs of riding a week? Then I'll have an excuse to upgrade.

    About 2 x 10, is the norm to drop the granny or the big ring from the triple? I would assume that you would exchange that high speed ring for the bash. That way, your bike is better suited for slower, trickier stuff.
    I've always taken multiple seasons to wear out chain rings. It varies, too - if yours are steel, they'll go even longer before they give you an excuse.

    Double cranks for MTB are all over the place. The old school MTB double setup was to drop the big ring. If you had a 22/32/whatever crank when you did that, you'd start running into problems maintaining speeds over about 20 mph. However, a rider with good technique could stretch that out to 25 or a bit more by pedaling really fast. For me, off road, this would be a non-issue. If I'm going that fast, I'm probably just trying to keep it together. On the road, I'd probably notice. Someone with smaller tires, like road slicks, would have a correspondingly smaller top speed.

    There are a few doubles that dropped the small ring, but that's relatively uncommon. Right now, a lot of the purpose-built doubles are putting one ring somewhere between 22 and 32 and one somewhere between 36 and 40. SRAM has a bunch on their web site so you can look at the specific gear combinations. I had an extended demo riding in a pretty mountainous place on a bike with SRAM's 2x10, and I didn't like it. I missed my granny!
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  28. #28
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    Thx 4 info.
    Update: stripped my current sun tour crank, so gonna get an Acera. Not the best, but I want to save more money for a better bike later, when this becomes a beater.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  29. #29
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    Does the Acera have replaceable rings? I know the Alivio does, and even Shimano's cheap cranks, if they're not the riveted ones, can last a long time.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  30. #30
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    Yep, replaceable HG chainrings! 22/32/42 too! haha
    Seemed legit, not plasticky like my suntour, even though they're comewhat close in price.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  31. #31
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    Awesome. Do it.

    The only caution with the sub-Deore cranks is that you need to be a bit careful about sourcing replacement chain rings. The faces on higher-spec Shimano rings that go against the spider have a bunch of detailing that interferes with the tabs on a lower-spec Shimano crank spider and will destroy the ring if you torque it down. So either get another Acera ring when it comes up, probably in three or more years, or get a different brand's chain ring that has flat faces.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  32. #32
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    AL vs Steel? Steel is economical, but other than AL is lighter, what are the diffs? Sorry, I just re-hijacked my own thread.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  33. #33
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    Aluminum's big pro is that it's stronger than steel by weight. While it takes more aluminum by volume to make something the same strength, it'll come out lighter.

    Aluminum's big con is that it's not as strong as steel by volume. This effects usefulness of aluminum in a volume-limited application - bolts, for example - and when it's subject to a lot of wear.

    It's not all that much weight either way. You can find some representative weights if you Google around. IIRC, it wasn't that much of a difference.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  34. #34
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    Sticking to Steel then haha, nothing fancy for me.

    "The faces on higher-spec Shimano rings that go against the spider have a bunch of detailing that interferes with the tabs on a lower-spec Shimano crank spider and will destroy the ring if you torque it down."
    What does this mean? I can't get a deore or better chainring for my crank? I doubt they sell "acera" chainrings.
    These OK? Shimano SLX M660 9SPD Chainring > Components > Drivetrain > Chainrings | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  35. #35
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    I ran into that problem trying to replace a ring back in 2009. I was unemployed at the time, so I wrote a blog about it.
    Andrew's Reflections: Shimano Chainrings are not Compatible with... Shimano
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  36. #36
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    Oh, and no. That SLX chainring will probably not play nicely with an Acera crank. Either get chainrings that will fit the crank you're getting, when it comes up, which won't be for a while, or get a fancier crank in the first place.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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