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Thread: do you torque?

  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    do you torque?

    working on a new build project. I do most minor repairs and tend to only properly torque the lockring on my hub. I'll be replacing a BB this week, so i was wondering how many people actually bust out the torque wrench for random jobs. Is it worth getting bb tools so i use my torque wrench, or if i should just go with something like sette's (pricepoint brand) bottom bracket tool that i wont be able to work w/ a torque wrench... $9.

    i may actually run into a problem removing my chainring on my SS rig. I plan on picking up a bash guard when i order new tools. a couple bolts kept coming loose... the college grad that i am, i LOADED locktight on the two problem bolts. I've since TRIED to remove them. any tips?
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  2. #2
    Vaginatarian
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    Quote Originally Posted by laackund
    working on a new build project. I do most minor repairs and tend to only properly torque the lockring on my hub. I'll be replacing a BB this week, so i was wondering how many people actually bust out the torque wrench for random jobs. Is it worth getting bb tools so i use my torque wrench, or if i should just go with something like sette's (pricepoint brand) bottom bracket tool that i wont be able to work w/ a torque wrench... $9.

    i may actually run into a problem removing my chainring on my SS rig. I plan on picking up a bash guard when i order new tools. a couple bolts kept coming loose... the college grad that i am, i LOADED locktight on the two problem bolts. I've since TRIED to remove them. any tips?
    you kind of answered your own question about torqueing with your chainring issue.
    If you had torqued the bolts to specs. you prob. wouldnt need the loctite or at most 1 or 2 drops per bolt.. the BB torque is very high (like 300 or more) and like you said, the tool wont work with my torque wrenches either, but 300 is alot so I feel safe cranking it as hard as I can ( not the bearing preload, the install) everything else I torque. especially anything going on carbon. as far as the chainring bolts, put a pipe on the end of your wrench, it will give you more leverage

  3. #3
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    Use a chainring bolt tool to hold the back of the chainring bolt so it doesn't just spin..

    To loosen up the loctite, touch a soldering iron to the bolt.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Use a chainring bolt tool to hold the back of the chainring bolt so it doesn't just spin..

    To loosen up the loctite, touch a soldering iron to the bolt.

    adding a chainring bolt tool to the list! 3$ at pricepoint. I'll give that a try when the mailman pays me a visit. thanks for the tip!
    1 hockey puck-$2
    1 mouthguard-$9
    8 missing teeth-$23K IOU from tooth fairy
    rattled brain forgetting impact-PRICELESS

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Use a chainring bolt tool to hold the back of the chainring bolt so it doesn't just spin..

    To loosen up the loctite, touch a soldering iron to the bolt.

    adding a chainring bolt tool to the list! 3$ at pricepoint. I'll give that a try when the mailman pays me a visit. thanks for the tip!
    1 hockey puck-$2
    1 mouthguard-$9
    8 missing teeth-$23K IOU from tooth fairy
    rattled brain forgetting impact-PRICELESS

  6. #6
    go chase the sunset
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    Anything which clamps around carbon I torque, so seat post clamp, stem, brake/shift levers in general (aluminum frame). I'd also torque brake mounts and disc rotor bolts (if not using centerlock) on a just in case sort of thing. The rest, as long as you know roughly how much force you should be using to tighten, will survive.

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