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  1. #1
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    Idea! DMR V8 Pedal Overhaul/Rebuild

    The V8 pedals use cup and cone bearings. Although the more recent DMR V8’s have a ‘Grease Port’ for periodically injecting fresh grease into the bearings, an occasional overhaul will keep them spinning smoothly for longer still.
    Start by removing the pedals from the crank arms, using a 15mm spanner. The right (drive) side pedal will loosen anti-clockwise and the left (non-drive) side pedal will loosen clockwise.

    DMRblk1.jpg

    The outside edge of each pedal has a plastic cap which can be prised out with a small point or screwdriver, taking care not to damage it (1). Holding the crank-side of the with the 15mm spanner, use a 12mm socket to remove the retaining nut from the outside bearing assembly (2). Use a flat-head screwdriver to carefully hold one of the edges of the bearing cone. Take care to only press against the cone and not catch the screwdriver against the bearings or the cup of the pedal (3). Spin the pedal axle and the cone will screw off, pushing the washer with it (4).

    DMRblk2.jpg

    Keep a hold of the axle and use a plastic pen top to extract the bearings, dropping them into a container for cleaning (5). Use WD40 or a citrus degreaser, making sure to dry the bearings off thoroughly before refitting. Considering the low cost, it's probably worth replacing the bearings with new ones. Remove the axle from the pedal and tip/prise out the remaining bearings to clean or replace (7).

    For cleaning bearings, I usually drop them into a small plastic container with enough WD40 to cover them; swill them around until all of the thick grease has dissolved; pour the contents onto a tissue to soak up the liquid (6); then transfer to a clean tissue to be wiped clean. A few drops of Isopropyl Alcohol over the bearings, then wiped again on a tissue, will guarantee grease/solvent free bearings.

    DMRblk3.jpg

    A cotton bud dipped in WD40/degreaser is ideal for wiping the inside of the bearing cups. The cups of the pedal should be totally smooth (8). Older pedals may have a distinct line worn around the cup, this is OK as long as it is smooth and consistent. The hub bearing in (9) is severely pitted. This kind of deterioration in a cup will inevitably spell the end for a component.

    Picture (10) shows all of the V8 pedal components, minus the bearings. Note the rubber seal that sits in the crank-end aperture. All of these components should be degreased before refitting.

    DMRblk4.jpg

    The grease for the bearings should be medium thickness. I don't know if DMR market the grease that they supply with the V8's, put Pedro's Syn is an excellent replacement. I use it for all bearing applications. A grease gun is useful here, or the small syringe that DMR supply with the pedals as it'll allow you to get just the right amount of grease into the race. Whatever, run a line of grease around the pedal cup (11), then use the plastic pen top/tool to place the bearings back into the cup (12). Another run of grease over the top of the bearings will hold them in place (13).

    DMRblk5.jpg

    Repeat this procedure on the other cup and re-insert the pedal axle (14), taking care not to knock any of the bearings out of place, although they should be pretty well held in by the grease.

    Holding the crank-end of the axle in place, screw the cone race onto the other end of the axle. The cone should be screwed down lightly until it touches the bearings. I use a small screwdriver to gently thread the cone on (15), taking care not to go past the cone and scratch the bearings or cup. Once the cone is in place, drop the washer onto the axle.

    Setting the bearings can be a series of trial and error adjustments. The idea is for the bearings to be sandwiched between the two races (cup and cone) with the smallest amount of compression possible. Too little and the axle will shift on its axis and cause uneven wear to the bearings/races; too much and the excessive friction will lead to rapid wear/destruction of the bearings/races.
    Bear in mind that the tightening of the locking nut will slightly compress the assembly. Thread the cone race down until it touches the bearings, then back it off by a degree or so and fully tighten the locking nut. Hold the pedal in one hand and the axle in the other (16) and feel for any play in the assembly. Does the axle wobble in the pedal? Is there obvious friction when you spin the pedal on its axle? Remember that you've just fitted fresh grease, so the pedal's spin is going to be a little heavy.
    To make any adjustments, loosen the locking nut slightly and carefully insert the tip of a flathead screwdriver between one edge of the cone race and the pedal body (3). Use fingers or a 15mm spanner to tighten/loosen the axle appropriately. Repeat these adjustments until the axle feels well placed; spins easy (no grinding) and doesn't wobble.
    Run a thin line of grease around the hole and refit the plastic dust cap to the outside edge of the pedal body.

    Grease the axle threads before refitting. Remember that the non-drive (left) side pedal will tighten anti-clockwise. Take care when threading the pedals in; a cross-thread here is much more likely to ruin the crank arm than it is the pedal.

    Peace,
    Steve
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  2. #2
    7am Backcountry ;- )
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    Great post mate! think ill give my V12's an overhaul in the spring. Do you know if the V12's will dismantle the same as the v8?

  3. #3
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    No. The V12's have sealed cartridge bearings. I know that he axle is replaceable and would assume that the bearings are, too, so it's probably an even easier job than this. The DMR web site shows the replacement axles, but not the bearings. If you contact the very helpful guys at DMR (technical@dmrbikes.com) I'm sure they'll point you in the right direction.
    Peace,
    Steve
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  4. #4
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  5. #5
    7am Backcountry ;- )
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    Cheers dude!

    Chainreaction are cool order a lot from them

  6. #6
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    Great thread. Thanks! One pedal (V8) done, but the second needs new bearings. Anyone know what size they are please?

  7. #7
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    Check out Cyclone's post up the page, there's a link to the bearings from Chain Reaction Cycles.
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the quick reply! I saw the link and figured 2.99 for 26 ball-bearings was a bit steep for a cheapskate like me

    Here's another dumb question while I'm here. The only reason I took the pedals apart (and I'm so glad I did!) is that I broke my wee DMR syringe. Well, that and the fact that I love taking things apart! Is there another way to get grease into the port without specialist equipment?

  9. #9
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    If you're getting into wrenching your own stuff (the domain of all genuine cheapskates) then cough up a tenner for a proper grease gun, like this one from Finish Line. It'll save you money in the long run because you'll be able to apply grease by the smallest of increments!!
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    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  10. #10
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    That's the grease-gun ordered. Still couldn't bring myself to buy the bearings though! Thanks again, Steve.

  11. #11
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    The v8s run on 1/8" bal-bearings, according to this -

    http://www.dmrbikes.com/res/CMSFiles...aintenance.pdf

    Hope this helps someone other than me!

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