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  1. #1
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    Diagnose... wheel spins ok, freewheel very slow

    I bought a used set of rims. Generally in OK shape, nothing special....

    I noticed they didn't spin very well so I took the skewers out, took the axle out, cleaned and re-greased the bearings, and put it all back together.

    It spins fine when I hold just the skewer. When I hold the freewheel and skewer (like coasting) it stops way to quick.

    Is there a way to fix / rebuild this or is the hub shot?

  2. #2
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    If it's a freewheel like you say then you could either replace it or sometimes you can spray in some lube to thin up the grease that is probably making it sticky.

    If it's a cassette, then the ratcheting mechanism is built into the hub and is sticking and creating the drag. Like freewheels they can usually be re-lubed, rebuilt, or replaced if necessary.

  3. #3
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    I may have used the wrong term. This is not the hub exactly, but it is similar in shape and look to the one below. When I hold the piece the cassette slides over (?) and spin (clicking sound) it slows too quickly.


  4. #4
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    The part that the cassette fits on is called a freehub body. That is the part that needs fixed on your hub and most good ones can be serviced, though it may need replaced. This may be a job for your local bike shop unless you're pretty comfortable wrenching. Find out what brand hub you have and check out a you tube vid on it. You can also spray some lube in the front and back side of the freehub body and see what happens, though if it fixes it it may only be temporary.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the advice. I will try spraying and see what it does.

  6. #6
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    I pulled the axle back out. I don't see how to remove the freehub body. Here is a picture of what I have. Can you tell if this is removable? I tried just pulling on it, but it doesn't budge. To I need to beat it out?


  7. #7
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    Depending on the year, Bontrager hubs may be American Classic or Formula/another brand. Instead of pulling straight out, try to disengage the pawls slightly (IE, in the direction of freewheel) and then pull on the body.

    Look inside and see if there is a fixing bolt (would typically be 10mm or larger) holding the freewheel on. A side-on view of the freehub would help us identify the fixing system a bit better.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    Depending on the year, Bontrager hubs may be American Classic or Formula/another brand. Instead of pulling straight out, try to disengage the pawls slightly (IE, in the direction of freewheel) and then pull on the body.

    Look inside and see if there is a fixing bolt (would typically be 10mm or larger) holding the freewheel on. A side-on view of the freehub would help us identify the fixing system a bit better.
    Bonty has never used American Classic design hubs.
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  9. #9
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    Bontrager used a King hub many years ago, and has used both DT Onyx and 240 hub internals over the years.

    However, the Superstock used neither. That is a Formula hub with a removable freehub body that is usually removed with a 11mm hex.
    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Freehub Service
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