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  1. #1
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    cleaning a chain with simple green?

    I always use it for my mountain bike chain when it is covered in dirt and mud. spray it on so the whole chain is soking, then wipe it down. Its not a penitrant like wd-40 but is it washing away all the impregnated greese in the links? if so what should I use to get the dirt off the chain?

  2. #2
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    Unless you trying to remove the lubricant from inside the rollers, the best method is to simply wipe your chain down with a rag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSpanker
    I always use it for my mountain bike chain when it is covered in dirt and mud. spray it on so the whole chain is soking, then wipe it down. Its not a penitrant like wd-40 but is it washing away all the impregnated greese in the links? if so what should I use to get the dirt off the chain?

    You are likely removing some of the lube in the rollers....that is okay you are probably removing some of the dirt etc as well form in the rollers.

    Then you you should rinse to get the simple green out of the rollers...then re lube to put the clean lube back in...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSpanker
    I always use it for my mountain bike chain when it is covered in dirt and mud. spray it on so the whole chain is soking, then wipe it down. Its not a penitrant like wd-40 but is it washing away all the impregnated greese in the links? if so what should I use to get the dirt off the chain?

    Don't use WD-40 to clean the chain. You will damage the chain and wash away all the grease in and out. Very terrible.

    You can just use a cloth and brush to remove all the dust and dirt. then ou just apply some grease on the chain surface and thatis it. In this way, you could prolong the chain life and keep the performance of the chain.

    Normally, there is no need to "clean" the chain.

    Bikeforever

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeforever
    Don't use WD-40 to clean the chain. You will damage the chain and wash away all the grease in and out. Very terrible.

    You can just use a cloth and brush to remove all the dust and dirt. then ou just apply some grease on the chain surface and thatis it. In this way, you could prolong the chain life and keep the performance of the chain.

    Normally, there is no need to "clean" the chain.

    Bikeforever

    What!!! Sorry you need to get the dirt out from the rollers, or the chain is draggy and wears out, WD-40 does that just fine.....you then have to dry the chain, and re-lube....

    Works fine, oh yeah, I would get about 3 months life if I don't clean and re-lube, if I clean and re-lube I can get about a year...

    The only caution about WD-40 is that it will damage the seals your bearings so don't use it when the chain is on the bike, unless you are very careful.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    What!!! Sorry you need to get the dirt out from the rollers, or the chain is draggy and wears out, WD-40 does that just fine.....you then have to dry the chain, and re-lube....

    Works fine, oh yeah, I would get about 3 months life if I don't clean and re-lube, if I clean and re-lube I can get about a year...

    The only caution about WD-40 is that it will damage the seals your bearings so don't use it when the chain is on the bike, unless you are very careful.
    I never have or will use wd-40 to clean my chain. its a penitrant and it can sneak into the impregnated greese and wreak havoc on it. I dont know if simple green does the same but it gets my chain clean enough to eat off of.

  7. #7
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    You will hear a lot of anti-WD40 evangelism on this board. Just ignore it. WD40 makes a very effective chain cleaner/lube.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSpanker
    I never have or will use wd-40 to clean my chain. its a penitrant and it can sneak into the impregnated greese and wreak havoc on it. I dont know if simple green does the same but it gets my chain clean enough to eat off of.
    Bicycle chains are not internally lubricated like and Oring motorcycle chain. There is no "impregnated" grease inside the rollers. Simple green and WD40 are doing the same thing by degreasing the chain.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    Bicycle chains are not internally lubricated like and Oring motorcycle chain. There is no "impregnated" grease inside the rollers. Simple green and WD40 are doing the same thing by degreasing the chain.
    If you degrease the chain after every ride, you will need to thoroughly dry the chain and remove any of the solvent then relube. Besides being time consuming, this is also very wasteful. If the proper lube is used for the conditions you ride in, you should get many rides in all but the most heinously wet conditions. So all you need to do is wipe the chain clean and allow the lubrication that does stay in the rollers to work.

    You can use WD-40 as a solvent if you want, but there are much more cost effective and environmentally sound degreasing products out there such as the Simple Green or my preferred citrus degreaser.

  10. #10
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    A while back, there was a warning from SRAM not to soak your chain in Simple Green for a long period, since it degrades the metal. I use it watered down in my chain cleaning tool, followed by a hot water rinse to remove the degreaser and dirt. After the chain is dry, I relube.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    You will hear a lot of anti-WD40 evangelism on this board. Just ignore it. WD40 makes a very effective chain cleaner/lube.
    +1 Agreed!!! I use WD40 to clean my chain all the time! Just Re-lube it and it's fine!!
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    You will hear a lot of anti-WD40 evangelism on this board. Just ignore it. WD40 makes a very effective chain cleaner/lube.
    While it may be a good cleaner and water displacer, WD-40 is not an effective lube for a bike chain. Squeaky door, yes, but it does not have the viscosity to properly lubricate a moving bike chain.

  13. #13
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    yah....dont lube it with WD! hit it with triflow or boeshield!!! After you clean it!!!
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say.” – Joshua Stinebrink

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    What!!! Sorry you need to get the dirt out from the rollers, or the chain is draggy and wears out, WD-40 does that just fine.....you then have to dry the chain, and re-lube....

    Works fine, oh yeah, I would get about 3 months life if I don't clean and re-lube, if I clean and re-lube I can get about a year...

    The only caution about WD-40 is that it will damage the seals your bearings so don't use it when the chain is on the bike, unless you are very careful.

    Sorry~I don't make this clear. When I mean "don't clean", I mean no need to put the chain into wd-40 or solvent stuff. It will damage the chain. We definitely need to clean the chain to prolong the chain life, but I mean in a carful way just like you said and in a correct way to do it. Thank you for let it clear.

    bikeforever

  15. #15
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    Shimano and SRAM only recommend wiping off the chain with a rag to get rid of the grit and grime. Then relube.


    But as a shop mechanic, I use a degreaser - like simple green - that I soak the chain in. But when using a degreaser, you must thoroughly rinse all the degreaser off the chain and make sure that the chain is completely dry before relubing. Use of an air compressor helps this process along. Then use your favorite chain lube.

  16. #16
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    Here is my take: the cause of most chain wear is grit, sand, dirt, metal particles, etc. that stay on the moving parts of the chain. Oils and greases simply hold all that stuff in suspension and further the cause of wear.
    For regular cleaning I use a blast of water sufficient enough to knock off the grim left on the chain, jockey wheels, cassette, and chainrings. Yes H2O! I then let everything drip dry.
    Follow that with an compressed air gun or even a leaf blower to dry further.
    Finally I re-lube with something like White Lightning, a WAX based lube, or other DRY FILM lubricants that won't hold grit in suspension.

    I used to take apart the chain, cassette, etc., and ultrasonic clean, then dunk in a hot parafin/solvent solution, but I've gotten lazy. I think my new method works well enough, as I have yet to see much difference.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplemind
    Here is my take: the cause of most chain wear is grit, sand, dirt, metal particles, etc. that stay on the moving parts of the chain. Oils and greases simply hold all that stuff in suspension and further the cause of wear.
    For regular cleaning I use a blast of water sufficient enough to knock off the grim left on the chain, jockey wheels, cassette, and chainrings. Yes H2O! I then let everything drip dry.
    Follow that with an compressed air gun or even a leaf blower to dry further.
    Finally I re-lube with something like White Lightning, a WAX based lube, or other DRY FILM lubricants that won't hold grit in suspension.

    I used to take apart the chain, cassette, etc., and ultrasonic clean, then dunk in a hot parafin/solvent solution, but I've gotten lazy. I think my new method works well enough, as I have yet to see much difference.
    thats great with the water. it blows all the crap away. but I would take the casette off because you are going to blow high powered water into the wheel bearings then they will rust to crap. its safer to get it wet. soap and scrub then rinse.

  18. #18
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    I take a rag spray SimpleGreen on to soak it and wrap the rag around the chain and spin the cranks. If the chain is really dirty I might have to do that a few times. Then I wipe off the same way with a dry clean rag, then apply the lube. In the winter I take very light grease and put on a rag and run the chain through it, coating the chain in a very thin coat of grease. It works very well in keeping water and crap off the chain.
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  19. #19
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    Spray on the WD40, wipe off the gunk and excess, go ride.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSpanker
    thats great with the water. it blows all the crap away. but I would take the casette off because you are going to blow high powered water into the wheel bearings then they will rust to crap. its safer to get it wet. soap and scrub then rinse.
    Never had an issue with the cassette/wheel bearings, as they are pretty well sealed and not in the direct line of spray. I just spray straight down on the teeth and rotate! If you have a known issue with water intruding in the bearings with low pressure water spray, I would like to know.
    Last edited by Simplemind; 12-09-2009 at 07:33 AM.

  21. #21
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    I soak and scrub for a few minutes in Simple Green, then flush with hot water, then throw it in the over on warm for about 15-20 minutes. This typically gets done after the muddier/dirtier rides only. Chain always looks brand new and I haven't had one problem.
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  22. #22
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    Sure!

    Just make sure you rinse thoroughly and get the water out so it doesn't rust. WD-40 is good for that. Let it sit after application overnight to do it's work then lube with a proper chain lube. I like to use compressed air and lube right away.

  23. #23
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    My method
    1. Fill el-cheapo Nashbar chain cleaner with about a 5:1 water:Simple Green solution
    2. Back pedal chain thru cleaner until you think it's clean enough (usually like 5-10 passes for me)
    3. Clean out chain cleaner. Fill with water. Repeat step 2.
    4. Repead step 3 (and 2) until the rinse water stays clear
    5. Blow off chain with compressed air
    6. Since water hides everywhere, spray chain with WD40 while backpedaling.
    7. Wipe excess WD40 off with a rag
    8. Next day (or before next ride) lube the chain (I often even skip this, but shouldn't)


    Depending on the conditions I might do this after every ride, or not touch the thing for a dozen rides. Not saying it's right, just saying it's worked for me. To clean the cassete I use a small brush, and rinse with a Round-Up sprayer full of water (use that on the whole bike actually). No high pressure stuff for me.

    Simular to my tools of choice.




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  24. #24
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    I use Rock N Roll or ProLink. Its a easy, super cleaner and oil in one.

    WD40 is a awesome cleaner for mountain bike and Motorcycle O-ring chains.

    It does not matter how good your lubricant is abrasive debris is not removed.

  25. #25
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    I like to keep my whole bike clean and go through lots of simple green. When the bike is really dirty, I: (1) spray the whole bike off with a water hose using a light mist (2) spray the whole bike down with simple green (3) let sit for a few minutes (4) rinse with water hose mist (5) with towel, dry chain, then the rest of the bike (6) lube chain. I've never specifically tried to clean my chain...I just clean the whole bike....shiny.

  26. #26
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    SRAM chains in particular had a problem a few years back with Simple Green. Chains exposed to it were breaking along the edges of the letters stamped into the plate. This wasn't necessarily due to a spray-on, rinse-off treatment, but it also wasn't clear whether repeated 5-minute soakings or a single 24-hour soaking (or some other variant) was the cause. And for some reason, this problem was particular to SRAM and not Shimano chains.

    My thoughts on WD-40: it's a good cleaner that'll penetrate under the rollers and eat up the "good grease." It won't necessarily rinse out any dirt -- you'd need an ultrasonic cleaner for that. Seriously -- you're more likely to drive dirt farther into the links or rollers with the WD40 as you are to drive it out.

    The heavy weight chain lubricant that gets displaced and degraded by the naptha-based solvent in WD40 evaporates off, and leaves behind a thin 3-in-1 type lightweight oil (along with all the left-over dirt particles that didn't get blasted out).

    Think about the time you used WD40 on that sticky mess of a carburator or throttle linkage, and how it absolutely destroyed that dried-up old lubricant. Stuff that you couldn't wipe off with your fingers (or wipe off your fingers) was suddenly no challenge. But the lightweight oil WD40 left behind could easily be wiped away with a shop cloth. This isn't what you want lubricating your chain. It needs a heavier weight lube that'll stay put under high tensions. A heavier lube will also suspend dirt already trapped under the chain rollers, and can block new dirt from entering. Sram packs their chains with that thick Gleitmo lube for a reason.

    Unless you have an ultrasonic cleaner, save yourself the headache of deep cleaning: wipe the dirty chain with a rag soaked with mineral spirits, lube it with an appropriate chain lube, wipe the exposed surfaces of the chain again with a mineral spirit-soaked rag (to remove any dirt-attracting oils), and ride.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedub.Nate
    SRAM chains in particular had a problem a few years back with Simple Green. Chains exposed to it were breaking along the edges of the letters stamped into the plate. This wasn't necessarily due to a spray-on, rinse-off treatment, but it also wasn't clear whether repeated 5-minute soakings or a single 24-hour soaking (or some other variant) was the cause. And for some reason, this problem was particular to SRAM and not Shimano chains.

    My thoughts on WD-40: it's a good cleaner that'll penetrate under the rollers and eat up the "good grease." It won't necessarily rinse out any dirt -- you'd need an ultrasonic cleaner for that. Seriously -- you're more likely to drive dirt farther into the links or rollers with the WD40 as you are to drive it out.

    The heavy weight chain lubricant that gets displaced and degraded by the naptha-based solvent in WD40 evaporates off, and leaves behind a thin 3-in-1 type lightweight oil (along with all the left-over dirt particles that didn't get blasted out).

    Think about the time you used WD40 on that sticky mess of a carburator or throttle linkage, and how it absolutely destroyed that dried-up old lubricant. Stuff that you couldn't wipe off with your fingers (or wipe off your fingers) was suddenly no challenge. But the lightweight oil WD40 left behind could easily be wiped away with a shop cloth. This isn't what you want lubricating your chain. It needs a heavier weight lube that'll stay put under high tensions. A heavier lube will also suspend dirt already trapped under the chain rollers, and can block new dirt from entering. Sram packs their chains with that thick Gleitmo lube for a reason.

    Unless you have an ultrasonic cleaner, save yourself the headache of deep cleaning: wipe the dirty chain with a rag soaked with mineral spirits, lube it with an appropriate chain lube, wipe the exposed surfaces of the chain again with a mineral spirit-soaked rag (to remove any dirt-attracting oils), and ride.


    +1 , good stuff here Nate, you are right on except the mineral spirit soaked rag will still carry grit where you don't want it. I still stand by the water blast. It doesn't remove the lube you want, but it does get rid of the exposed grit. I also stand by wax lubricants or other dry films as the don't attract or hold in suspension the grit.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplemind

    +1 , good stuff here Nate, you are right on except the mineral spirit soaked rag will still carry grit where you don't want it. I still stand by the water blast. It doesn't remove the lube you want, but it does get rid of the exposed grit. I also stand by wax lubricants or other dry films as the don't attract or hold in suspension the grit.
    Hmmm... allow me to clarify. The rag needs to be wet with mineral spirits, but not dripping wet to where it's making a mess on the floor or soaking the chain. Basically, wet enough to attract the surface grime.

    I went through a few years with wax. It worked well enough for me as long as I religiously applied it at the end of each ride, giving it enough drying time before riding the bike again. But on longer rides or if I got lazy, often had to resort to oil-based lube, because wet wax didn't work. That wasn't necessarily the problem, but if I was going to re-coat with wax, I had to do a very thorough, time consuming cleaning / degreasing before rebuilding my wax base -- wax on top of oil didn't work very well.

    In the end, for me, it just wasn't worth it, and I went back to petroleum-based lubes. But I DID enjoy ending rides with a clean chain.
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  29. #29
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    Here is a motorcyclist that gets 35,000 miles from his chain on his GSX-R1000, doing wheelies and trackdays using only WD40. This is unheard-of miles because the myth is that WD40 kills the o-rings in a motorcycle chain and WD40 is not a lube.

    http://www.southbayriders.com/forums...highlight=WD40

    My take away is that the cleanliness of your chain is more important than the lube.

    As you can read about on http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html , some philosophies not to use chain lube at all.

    About the grease packed in the rollers: Sheldon suggest that the reason that today's bushing-less chains last longer the space for oil flow under the roller.




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    Kilroy, thanks for thowing Sheldon's article up. He ought to know!

  31. #31
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    I have to change my chain about every other year due to stretching anyway.

    I contend that whether I only use only WD40, or I meticulously clean and lube with whatever the current favorite lube is, or just simply wipe off the dirt and ride, I am not going to increase or decrease this life expectancy of a chain.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    I have to change my chain about every other year due to stretching anyway.

    I contend that whether I only use only WD40, or I meticulously clean and lube with whatever the current favorite lube is, or just simply wipe off the dirt and ride, I am not going to increase or decrease this life expectancy of a chain.

    Oh, yes you will increase the life expectancy of a chain with good lube and cleaning. Chains don't "stretch", the insides of the rollers and outside of the pins wear down, causing the chain to elongate as each pin wears into the link plate it goes through.

    So, if you keep the chain clean and lubed the pins and rollers won't wear as fast and your chain won't "stretch" as quickly.

    from sheldonbrown.com:

    "Cyclists often speak of chain "stretch", as if the side plates of an old chain were pulled out of shape by the repeated stresses of pedaling. This is not actually how chains elongate. The major cause of chain "stretch" is wearing away of the metal where the rivet rotates inside of the bushing (or the "bushing" part of the inside plate) as the chain links flex and straighten as the chain goes onto and off of the sprockets. If you take apart an old, worn out chain, you can easily see the little notches worn into the sides of the rivets by the inside edges of the bushings. With bushingless chains, the inside edge of the side plate hole that rubs against the rivet has a smooth radius instead of a sharp corner. This probably contributes to the greater durability of bushingless chains."

    Pics here, http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Killroy
    Here is a motorcyclist that gets 35,000 miles from his chain on his GSX-R1000, doing wheelies and trackdays using only WD40. This is unheard-of miles because the myth is that WD40 kills the o-rings in a motorcycle chain and WD40 is not a lube.
    Motorcycles use O-ring sealed chains. Lubricant sprayed on the outside of the chain won't make it in.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Unless you trying to remove the lubricant from inside the rollers, the best method is to simply wipe your chain down with a rag.
    Dirt and grit get inside the chain because the chain is not sealed. Wiping the outside of the chain is only cosmetic.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monte
    Oh, yes you will increase the life expectancy of a chain with good lube and cleaning. Chains don't "stretch", the insides of the rollers and outside of the pins wear down, causing the chain to elongate as each pin wears into the link plate it goes through.

    So, if you keep the chain clean and lubed the pins and rollers won't wear as fast and your chain won't "stretch" as quickly.

    from sheldonbrown.com:

    "Cyclists often speak of chain "stretch", as if the side plates of an old chain were pulled out of shape by the repeated stresses of pedaling. This is not actually how chains elongate. The major cause of chain "stretch" is wearing away of the metal where the rivet rotates inside of the bushing (or the "bushing" part of the inside plate) as the chain links flex and straighten as the chain goes onto and off of the sprockets. If you take apart an old, worn out chain, you can easily see the little notches worn into the sides of the rivets by the inside edges of the bushings. With bushingless chains, the inside edge of the side plate hole that rubs against the rivet has a smooth radius instead of a sharp corner. This probably contributes to the greater durability of bushingless chains."

    Pics here, http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html.
    Jeez, Monte, way to go off on a tangent.

    I think "stretch" is a generally accepted term that doesn't require the full technical dissertation whenever somebody uses it.
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  36. #36
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    I use Simple Green as a chain cleaner... in the fashion that Sheldon Brown described in that article:

    I used to use a parts cleaning tank and a toothbrush to clean chains, but Zaven Ghazarian, an excellent mechanic I used to work with came up with a better system: drop the chain into a plastic Coke bottle with a couple of ounces of un-diluted citrus degreaser, cap it, and shake thoroughly. Fish the chain out with a spoke, rinse in water, and you are all set! (I am told that Pepsi bottles also work, and are easier to remove the chain from, because they have a wider mouth...but I'm a Coke guy, not a Pepsi guy.)
    Me, I use a big-mouth plastic jar that originally contained mixed nuts from a supermarket. Easier to grab the chain that way, and it doesn't get as tangled on itself.

    I alternate between two chains on each bike. That way there's always a clean chain hanging around, and I don't have to wait around for the freshly cleaned chain to dry off before installing a clean one. This also helps spread the wear between the two chains for longer drivetrain life.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedub.Nate
    Jeez, Monte, way to go off on a tangent.

    I think "stretch" is a generally accepted term that doesn't require the full technical dissertation whenever somebody uses it.
    Maybe my point got lost somewhere.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    I have to change my chain about every other year due to stretching anyway.

    I contend that whether I only use only WD40, or I meticulously clean and lube with whatever the current favorite lube is, or just simply wipe off the dirt and ride, I am not going to increase or decrease this life expectancy of a chain.
    I was trying to say SM would indeed increase the life expectancy of his chain IF he did indeed clean and lube it. To me it sounded like he didn't know that "stretch" is actually the result of wear of the pins and insides of the rollers.

  38. #38
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    I understood your meaning. My assumption was that "stretch" was a combination of wear and metal fatigue, but I can see that it may be strictly caused by wear.

    My point is, I think 2 years of moderate to heavy use out of a chain is good, and that is what I have been averaging....and while I have tried lubes of various sorts, MOST of the time I just spray some WD40 on the chain, wipe it off, and call it done. In other words, If I plan to replace the chain every 2 years anyway, then the statistical minimum, or worst performing lube that gets me there is still acceptable. Chain lube arguments are like arguing politics and religion. Everyone states opinions, backed by "facts" that support them, and countered by "facts" from the opposition...in the end its all the same. Its a bicycle chain for crying out loud. Who the heck cares that you take such good care of your chain that it will outlast your bike?
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    I understood your meaning. My assumption was that "stretch" was a combination of wear and metal fatigue, but I can see that it may be strictly caused by wear.
    Yeah, that's all I was trying to tell ya, it's wear, not metal fatigue.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    I understood your meaning. My assumption was that "stretch" was a combination of wear and metal fatigue, but I can see that it may be strictly caused by wear.

    My point is, I think 2 years of moderate to heavy use out of a chain is good, and that is what I have been averaging....and while I have tried lubes of various sorts, MOST of the time I just spray some WD40 on the chain, wipe it off, and call it done. In other words, If I plan to replace the chain every 2 years anyway, then the statistical minimum, or worst performing lube that gets me there is still acceptable. Chain lube arguments are like arguing politics and religion. Everyone states opinions, backed by "facts" that support them, and countered by "facts" from the opposition...in the end its all the same. Its a bicycle chain for crying out loud. Who the heck cares that you take such good care of your chain that it will outlast your bike?
    a chain doesn't just stretch like laffy taffy. It elongates due to the side to side vibrations. As a result of the elongating, it becomes longer.

  41. #41
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    WD40 is for suckers.
    Clean your chain with a lube like Rock-n-roll or prolink, wipe off, you're good to go.
    Problem with any forum is that you have no idea if the posters usage in any way matches your usage.
    Some guy says his chain lasts through 2 years of heavy use. What does "heavy use" constitute? I ride in mostly dry climes but I would destroy my entire drivetrain if I used a chain must more than a year of what I would call "moderate" use.
    But "moderate" and "heavy" have about as much meaning as words like "good". We really have no idea what that means.
    Chains are relatively cheap. Change them before you wear them out. Do whatever you want with it in the meantime until you have some sort of issue then make some sort of change.
    Me, I use Formula 409, diluted about 50%, rinse with a gentle, indirect water spray, dry, apply Rock-n-roll lube liberally, wait 5 minutes spinning the drivetrain every now and then, and wipe off the excess. I try to do this after I ride, not before.
    I resist all impulses to remove the chain unless absolutely necessary.

    WD40 is for suckers and the devil. People who suggest its use routinely as a chain lubricant are either malicious or foolish.

  42. #42
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    I'm neither being malicious or foolish. I will continue to use WD40 because it works for me. Others will do what works for them, despite the drivel some will spout over an internet forum. So you call me a sucker - see if I care.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  43. #43
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    To me:

    Rock n' Roll is blue WD40 with teflon in it.

    ProLink is WD40 with more oil in it.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man
    I'm neither being malicious or foolish. I will continue to use WD40 because it works for me. Others will do what works for them, despite the drivel some will spout over an internet forum. So you call me a sucker - see if I care.
    Easy, man.... My drivel is just as valid as your drivel. I happen to maintain that WD40 is for suckers and the devil. You claim to align yourself with the suckers... Maybe I'm calling you the devil. Maybe I'm not addressing you at all. Maybe I prefer Crisco in my bearings and olive oil on my chain. In deliciousness there is really no comparison.
    I can care less. But I don't. I do care. I care about you and your poor chain soaking in WD40. I want you and the rest of our dear readers and especially our OP to have nice things that stay clean and work well and last a long time. I care about the air quality in your garage as you huff yourself into a stupor during a routine lubing with your WD40. All those braincells, gone.....
    And as for you caring... I really, really hope you care. I hope you take every single word I post and cherish them, and reflect on their deeper, higher meaning.
    Don't stop caring. Ever. Don't. Stop.



    By now I hope you can understand that I'm messing with you in the best of my nature. I'm sorry to offend your WD40 loyalties. Keep on keeping on with your WD40. It was good enough for dad!

  45. #45
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    How dare you post a picture of fat teletubbies in response to my post! Get off the internet you troll.

    Every must know this - if it doesn't move but it should, it needs WD40. If it moves but it shouldn't, it needs duct tape.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  46. #46
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    beginner mountain biker here..howdy folks..so i have zep citrus degreaser that i water down in a spray bottle and sometimes i'll go full strength for ball bearing or really dirty chain..is this ok?

  47. #47
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    If you want to keep your chain real BRIGHT, use Rock N Roll or ProLink. You don't need simple green, WD40 or any de-greaser.


  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemtbnaz
    beginner mountain biker here..howdy folks..so i have zep citrus degreaser that i water down in a spray bottle and sometimes i'll go full strength for ball bearing or really dirty chain..is this ok?
    I recall Zep being a really good grease eater and is magic on exhaust stains. I don't know whether it would have an effect on chains similar to Simple Green, but I'd take care not to soak links in it for a prolonged periods -- basically wash, scrub, rinse.

    I'm not sure what bearings you're using it on, but as long as you are rinsing off the residue and thoroughly re-luning with an appropriate grease, you ought to be in good shape.
    speedub.nate
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  49. #49
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    thanks for the good info and the most important (rinse!!) i was using it on the steel ball bearing in the hub and spraying it on and in the derailluer than relubing all the pivots once dry, also on the cogs too.

  50. #50
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    I just use a bit of kerosene to clean my chain. I will soak it for a few minutes, brush it for a few more, then use the air compressor to blow out the rest. I will dry with a rag, then spray with whatever I have around the house, whether it be motorcycle chain wax, white lightning, white lithium spray, whatever.....I just don't use WD40 to lube the chain. It is not because the chain is allergic to it, I just don't like that WD40 doesn't stay put and forces me to clean my back rim front splatter when using as a chain lube.

    Just my $.02......to each their own though.....This is a definately a subjective post.....

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