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  1. #1
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    Clean your chain, and this is what you'll find

    50 miles total on a 971 chain. The pics are taken after the 4th and 5th cleanings in kerosene. The chain was cleaned after all but the first ride, and lubricated before each. Each solvent bath cleaning was at least 24hrs long, and shaken several times during the period.

    The cassette, rings, and idlers have had several cleanings. I try very hard to avoid bad chain angles, and the rides are in NE Kansas. Two were wet rides, and the rest damp to dry soil.

    I was quite surprised to see quantity magnetic material after about 18 miles. The kerosene was fresh for the 4th cleaning and reused/unstrained for the 5th.
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    Last edited by ExtraStout; 02-03-2006 at 09:33 PM. Reason: MAGNETIC is now in bold

  2. #2
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    i dont have any idea what i'm looking at here...

  3. #3
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    Zoomed out
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  4. #4
    Gimme my MOJO!
    Reputation: leleklegrunt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExtraStout
    Zoomed out
    Still dunno what I am looking at, although I am guessing that behind "it" is a magnet and all that sludge like stuff is actually worn off metal from the chain?

  5. #5
    Weird huh?
    Reputation: cmdrpiffle's Avatar
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    seriously?

    You may wanna just ride your bike.
    And don't do the burrito jump... Francois

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmdrpiffle
    You may wanna just ride your bike.
    yeah

    lol, pretty cool stuff !

  7. #7
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    Everything I've ever read concerning chain cleaning says to "Not" leave your chain in a cleansing solution for long periods of time and 24 hours is too long. Especially with kerosene. That's why the use of chain specific cleaners is, for the most part, better for chains in the long run. The shimano chains have built in lubes within the chain itself and they recommend not, I say again, not putting a chain into a solution for more than about an hour. Leaving it in any longer doesn't clean it any better and if there are proprietary graphite type long lasting anti friction substances built into the chain you'll just disolve them all the way you're doing it. While it may have worked well(to you) with other chains it's likely this chain really hates, at least, kerosene.

    I've found by just cleaning the chain on a regular basis(once a week when it's dry out) with a citrus degreaser(I use an on the bike chain cleaning machine), rinsing with water, drying and applying a good lube my chains last a few years with great shifting and no breaking or *ahem* disolving. :-)

  8. #8
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
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    Maybe you have,...

    ... a lot of iron in the dirt where you ride.

    That, and are you cleaning your chain with Dawn after the Kerosene? They says solvent residue will cut the chainlube unless you clean it out with Dawn.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    Steel Shavings I Assume

    I found shavings on the cyclometer magnet after a very sandy ride. The area was heavily used by 4x4 and motorcycles.
    Sounds like you have the same thing. Put a magnet on the bike, do the same ride.
    It`s proply not the chain.

  10. #10
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    It seems you are not focused on SRAM, which is ok if that is was your intent.

    SRAM says to not use acid dissolving solvents, and kerosene is not acidic. As for the time period in the solvent was a convenient time period for me.

    Graphite is not soluble in kerosene, and is this 'proprietary graphite type long lasting anti friction substances built into the chain' another schimano reference?


    SRAM guide:
    http://www.sram.com/_media/techdocs/..._MTB_08_02.pdf

    Quote Originally Posted by fred3
    Everything I've ever read concerning chain cleaning says to "Not" leave your chain in a cleansing solution for long periods of time and 24 hours is too long. Especially with kerosene. That's why the use of chain specific cleaners is, for the most part, better for chains in the long run. The shimano chains have built in lubes within the chain itself and they recommend not, I say again, not putting a chain into a solution for more than about an hour. Leaving it in any longer doesn't clean it any better and if there are proprietary graphite type long lasting anti friction substances built into the chain you'll just disolve them all the way you're doing it. While it may have worked well(to you) with other chains it's likely this chain really hates, at least, kerosene.

    I've found by just cleaning the chain on a regular basis(once a week when it's dry out) with a citrus degreaser(I use an on the bike chain cleaning machine), rinsing with water, drying and applying a good lube my chains last a few years with great shifting and no breaking or *ahem* disolving. :-)

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Iron in the soil is highly probable as it is evident in many limestones here. However, I would not expect to find it in any state in nature but heavily oxidized. Read, rusty brown, and it is not very magnetic.

    The stuff in the pics above is the color of finely ground metal, light to medium gray.

    No Dawn is needed to remove more grease/oil. After 10 hrs out of the kerosene or so the chain is dry. IE the kerosene evaporates. I will see if the chain has kerosene sent the next time. The surface is powdery with soil and the junk which sticks to or settles on the chain. I then remove the easy stuff with a towel.

    Perhaps flushing it with a water, and or liquid dish soap solution would be one step closer to a clean chain. I will have to consider the extra step.

    I did not dream the kerosene idea up myself, btw. I have to give MTBR users credit, and I would not if it were not so easy to R&R an SRAM chain.

    Now from a chemical standpoint and a physics standpoint I do not see an issue with petroleum based solvents used assist in cleaning petroleum from steel.

    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    ... a lot of iron in the dirt where you ride.

    That, and are you cleaning your chain with Dawn after the Kerosene? They says solvent residue will cut the chainlube unless you clean it out with Dawn.

  12. #12
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    Sounds like a cheap and easy experiment. However, only foot and MTB traffic use trails.

    Quote Originally Posted by consumerbydesign
    I found shavings on the cyclometer magnet after a very sandy ride. The area was heavily used by 4x4 and motorcycles.
    Sounds like you have the same thing. Put a magnet on the bike, do the same ride.
    It`s proply not the chain.

  13. #13
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    You all are going thru way too much trouble with your chains.
    I use ProLink and all I ever do is drip a whole butt load full of it on the chain about once a week while back pedalling. Then let it sit for a minute, then wipe off the excess. It then dries bone dry. Cleaning and lubing all in one step.
    And I never had any shifting problems due to my chain.
    YMMV
    Lenny

  14. #14
    Linoleum Knife
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExtraStout
    Perhaps flushing it with a water, and or liquid dish soap solution would be one step closer to a clean chain. I will have to consider the extra step.
    I give my chain a Kerosene bath about once every 2 months. Cassette and chainrings too.

    Usually it coincides with a bike washing, so after swishing around in the Kerosene (anything more than 30 minutes is not any more productive) I'll pour out the kerosene and pour in the leftover carwash soap, then rinse with clean water.

    There has been lots of squawk on Velonews lately about leaving a chain in a solution for a long period of time, but some of those people apparently store their chains in the stuff over the course of months.

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