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  1. #1
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    Changing gears whilst pedaling uphill

    Hey guys.

    I'm a newb here and my product knowledge is sweet f all.

    I ride a Felt 400FS and if I'm riding bush tracks trying to power up hill and need to change gears my current stock system doesn't like this at all and will slip.

    What can I upgrade to allow this type of thing?

    Cheers

  2. #2
    AKA Dr.Nob
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    This is a problem lots of new riders have. It has nothing to do with the bike. Bikes don't like to change gears when under heavy load. This usually happens on a slow climb.

    You have to plan ahead and change into the right gear before hitting the hill. You can change the cogs on the rear cluster if you desperatly have to but the front is unlikely to change.

    If you stop pedaling for a second this can some times allow the gears to change.

    As you get more experienced you will learn to pick the right gears before hitting the climb.
    Not that all teenagers are evil mind, just most of them.

  3. #3
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    Yourself

    Simple as that it's nothing to do with the bike, it's your technique or really lack there of. Every begginer experiences this and can't figure why and thinks it's the bike's fault when in fact it isn't. What you have to do is learn to ease the pressure off of the drive train if you want to shift and here's how it's done.......................

    When peddaling uphill under load and you want to change gears, it's very simple to accomplish - you simple do a 1/2 hard stroke. I'll explain. when you decide you want to change simply give a serious 1/2 power stroke from about 9 to 3 o'clock over the top of the stroke and then ease the pressure off through the bottom of the stroke. The hard upper 1/2 stroke should keep your momentum and allow you to release the pressure on the bottom 1/2 of the stroke and give the gears the "space" they need to smoothly shift.


    Quote Originally Posted by demonx
    Hey guys.

    I'm a newb here and my product knowledge is sweet f all.

    I ride a Felt 400FS and if I'm riding bush tracks trying to power up hill and need to change gears my current stock system doesn't like this at all and will slip.

    What can I upgrade to allow this type of thing?

    Cheers
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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    My Phantom pics

  4. #4
    CAN YOU DIG IT??!!??!!!??
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Simple as that it's nothing to do with the bike, it's your technique or really lack there of. Every begginer experiences this and can't figure why and thinks it's the bike's fault when in fact it isn't. What you have to do is learn to ease the pressure off of the drive train if you want to shift and here's how it's done.......................

    When peddaling uphill under load and you want to change gears, it's very simple to accomplish - you simple do a 1/2 hard stroke. I'll explain. when you decide you want to change simply give a serious 1/2 power stroke from about 9 to 3 o'clock over the top of the stroke and then ease the pressure off through the bottom of the stroke. The hard upper 1/2 stroke should keep your momentum and allow you to release the pressure on the bottom 1/2 of the stroke and give the gears the "space" they need to smoothly shift.

    Yep, BEFORE you shift, let up on the pressure on the pedals & then shift. When your shifting you just want to spin the cranks NOT mash on them. This will allow you to shift going up hill or anywhere. The best side effect of this technique; veeery long lasting drive train.
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  5. #5
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    I'll add two things:
    1) Don't try to shift the front derailluer while climbing - that is bad and can lead to broken chains and twisted derailluers. You might be able to do this if timed just right with the above mentioned soft-pedal technique, but I wouln't risk it.
    2) Shimano Rapid-rise rear derailluers work very well at shifting under load. That's what they were designed to do. The derailluer spring shifts the gears to the next biggest cog, not the cable tension, so it tends to keep the chain in the current cog until the ramps on the cassette line up with the chain. I've used both styles of shimano, and that's what I took away from the experience. My current bike has SRAM.
    So I would say to learn better technique first, but you could also switch to rapid rise if you want better rear shifting while climbing.

  6. #6
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    Was going to mention this, but it's not totally necessary, perfecting good shifting technique first is more important. I will say though that I too prefer the new Rapid Rise Shimano derailleurs that pull the chain up to the largest (easiest) rear cog when there's no cable tension.

    Quote Originally Posted by kdiddy
    I'll add two things:........................................... ............
    2) Shimano Rapid-rise rear derailluers work very well at shifting under load. That's what they were designed to do. The derailluer spring shifts the gears to the next biggest cog, not the cable tension, so it tends to keep the chain in the current cog until the ramps on the cassette line up with the chain. I've used both styles of shimano, and that's what I took away from the experience. My current bike has SRAM.
    So I would say to learn better technique first, but you could also switch to rapid rise if you want better rear shifting while climbing.
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  7. #7
    exacerbated member
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    I wouldn’t say it was as cut and dry as all that (see other posts)

    Technique is key - that is for sure, but a well-designed and properly adjusted drive train can do shifts under load.
    For example rising on a 11-20 with the right chain and a good tooth profile under load is no sweat but grabbing the last cog on a low end 12-32 under load will take some skill.

    Dropping onto the granny when you can’t afford to alter your cadence because of traction issues is totally possible with a cage that is shaped to do this if you are in the correct cog and you remember to switch out of indexed mode so you can keep the chain from going strait to the BB shell.

    Good equipment adjusts better and performs better than poor or worn-out equipment.

    So then since the OP does not reveal what equipment he is using the easy answer becomes ‘you need more skill’.

  8. #8
    MTBR Demi-God
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Simple as that it's nothing to do with the bike, it's your technique or really lack there of. Every begginer experiences this and can't figure why and thinks it's the bike's fault when in fact it isn't. What you have to do is learn to ease the pressure off of the drive train if you want to shift and here's how it's done.......................

    When peddaling uphill under load and you want to change gears, it's very simple to accomplish - you simple do a 1/2 hard stroke. I'll explain. when you decide you want to change simply give a serious 1/2 power stroke from about 9 to 3 o'clock over the top of the stroke and then ease the pressure off through the bottom of the stroke. The hard upper 1/2 stroke should keep your momentum and allow you to release the pressure on the bottom 1/2 of the stroke and give the gears the "space" they need to smoothly shift.
    Very true. It is sort of like "clutching" the drivetrain while shifting. Just make sure you have enough momentum, and then ease off the cranks (but still pedalling) and shift gears- once done, start putting pressure back on. With practice it comes naturally and barely takes more than half a second.
    "Winners never quit. Quitters never win. But those who never win and never quit are idiots."

  9. #9
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    I regularly stand and mash hills, I also regularly shift (both way) while mashing up a hill.

    Going up towards granny, I shift before the pedals hit 12 and 6, the chain shifts and climbs the cog and has esstentially shifted before the pwoer really comes on.

    I don't think I back off at all when doing this.

    Going down the cable release is just not as postive so I do back of just a bit.

    I run an XTR normal rise RD and the XTR 970 11-34 cassette.

    If you have a worn chain or cassette it will start to slip doing this, if it isn't worn it seems to be fine.

  10. #10
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    Thanks to all who have posted.

    I tried to take a pic of the drive train but it didn't really turn out too great - the reason I was asking about upgrade is because its just the stock/out of the box parts and not an aftermarket set up - so it's sure to be crap and easily improved.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by demonx
    Thanks to all who have posted.

    I tried to take a pic of the drive train but it didn't really turn out too great - the reason I was asking about upgrade is because its just the stock/out of the box parts and not an aftermarket set up - so it's sure to be crap and easily improved.

    You don't want to shift that end while going uphill! Tis the other end that you should worry about. What the previous posts said was true. Crank hard, let off, shift, pedal lightly, and most drivetrains will shift.

    As far as bang for buck upgrades to your drivetrain, I'd replace your rear derailleur before I upgraded the cranks. You change gears on the rear cassette many times each ride, but change the front chainrings only a handful of time (if that) during the ride. New XT or X.9 rear derailleur should run under $100. New cranks/rings are going to be closer to $200.

  12. #12
    exacerbated member
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    Taking a pic for the purpose of showing how your drive train is set up must be done in a wholly different way than that.

    Put your bike on its wheels supported vertically. Shoot from the rear square to the ground with a long depth of field and the big ring exactly on edge. The shot must be in focus. The chain should be on the small ring and the big cog.

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