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  1. #1
    No dear i got it cheaper
    Reputation: tails's Avatar
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    Chain slippage on cassette pics included

    Hi, wonder if some kind person could help just built a new bike but kept old cassette (which doesn't look worn) and old XO mech but new chain and XTR crank. The problem is in the stand the bike cranks great but when riding the chain slips on the rear cassette under hard pedal action. Can anybody give me any clues what it could be, maybe a new cassette ?. Pics included of the chain coming of the cassette while under load and brake on slightly.
    Cheers in advance.
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  2. #2
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    It sounds like the old cassette is too worn for the new chain. Does this occur in your favourite gears only?

    Do you still have your old chain, you could just use the old chain until everything is completely worn out.
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  3. #3
    No dear i got it cheaper
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    Yeah going to stick my old chain back on to see if it works, if so buy a new cassette.

  4. #4
    TC3
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    Looks like an Uzzi's dropout... congrats!
    I thinks she deserves a new cassette

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    You can not really see worn out cogs. If it is skipping with a new chain it is worn.

    Best to replace the cassette and chain together. Replacing the chain regularly (2x a year or so) will prolong the cassette life.
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  6. #6
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    yeah...must change chain and cassette as one...although some dudes say you should get two or three chains per cassette...by changing the chain frequently
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Replacing the chain regularly (2x a year or so) will prolong the cassette life.
    Doe this method always work Shiggy? I have tried to replace a chain before it even measured any wear once but the old cassette would not take a new chain. Of course it only skipped in my two favourite cogs.

    I tried to switch from a Shimano chain to a Sram chain, maybe that had something to do with it.
    Last edited by GearHead; 01-26-2006 at 04:29 AM.
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  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearHead
    Doe this method always work Shiggy? I have tried to replace a chain before it even measured any wear once but the old cassette would not take a new chain. Of course it only skipped in my two favourite cogs.

    I tried to switch from a Shimano chain to a Sram chain, maybe that had something to do with it.
    Well, you have to be sure you're measuring it correctly, and I like to change mine before 1/16th of stretch in 12". If I let it go to that limit, it usually starts to do damage to the cassette and rings up front.

    I have had a cassette wear out in a matter of a couple months with a new chain. That was a Sram cassette, and I'm never going down that road again.

    I've had good luck with the shimano chains, BUT if you put a lot of miles on your bike or really torque it hard, you may need to replace the chain more often than 6 months apart.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Well, you have to be sure you're measuring it correctly, and I like to change mine before 1/16th of stretch in 12". If I let it go to that limit, it usually starts to do damage to the cassette and rings up front.

    I have had a cassette wear out in a matter of a couple months with a new chain. That was a Sram cassette, and I'm never going down that road again.

    I've had good luck with the shimano chains, BUT if you put a lot of miles on your bike or really torque it hard, you may need to replace the chain more often than 6 months apart.
    It was measured correctly and had less than the 1/16" of wear. I do have quite powerful legs and it was the two cogs which I always use for steep climbs so I may have just worn those out before the chain wore out. The new chain would work perfect on every other cog and only skipped on really steep climbs in those two cogs.
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  10. #10
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    I had a problem like that, but on my bike was a loosing cassette, just make sure if your cassette is fully tight!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearHead
    It was measured correctly and had less than the 1/16" of wear. I do have quite powerful legs and it was the two cogs which I always use for steep climbs so I may have just worn those out before the chain wore out. The new chain would work perfect on every other cog and only skipped on really steep climbs in those two cogs.
    is it possible to buy individual cogs...i have favorite cogs that the chain stay on way too often
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamantane
    is it possible to buy individual cogs...i have favorite cogs that the chain stay on way too often
    I believe you used to be able to do this but not any more. All of the more expensive cassettes use an aluminum spider to carry the largest cogs so these couldn't be replaced. The cheaper cassettes are the ones with individual cogs and it probably just as cost effective to buy a whole new cassette than buy individual cogs.

    Here is a link to an exploded view of a Shimano LX cassette, everything that has a unique part number can be easily purchased separatley. The individual parts are expensive though.

    http://bike.shimano.com/media/cyclin...9830538725.pdf
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