Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    106

    Chain ever suppose to rub against derailleur?

    I've noticed that if I'm in 1st gear (smallest) for the front derailer and 9th gear on the rear derailer that the chain will rub against (insert part name) on the derailleur in the front and I don't know if this means I should adjust it or not.

  2. #2
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    Is "9th gear" the big cog or the little one?

    I've found it can be difficult sometimes to completely eliminate derailleur rubbing in the small ring and big cog. Try adjusting the limit screws. You may just have to live with it.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: broz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    230
    If you are going little ring in front to little ring in back, that is likely to cause rubbing that can't be eliminated. It may also cause your chain to skip,

    If you are going little to big, this should be possible without rubbing and you should either adjust your limit screw and/or determine whether you have a bent spider.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    6,689

    This combination is....

    Quote Originally Posted by imzjustplayin
    I've noticed that if I'm in 1st gear (smallest) for the front derailer and 9th gear on the rear derailer that the chain will rub against (insert part name) on the derailleur in the front and I don't know if this means I should adjust it or not.
    a NO NO!!! It's called cross chaining and is BAD for the chain and the drive train. The severe angle of the chain puts excess stress on the chain and the cogs. It'll wear them out quick if you use this comgination allot. There are very few bikes out there that won't rub in the small ring/small cog combination, or in the large ring/large cog combination for that matter! It is not uncommon for the chain to rub the front derailleur cage in extreme gear combinations like that.

    If you want that particular gear ratio there is an equivalent. Shift to the middle ring in the front and then shift two cogs up in the back (7th gear). That will give you the same gear ratio as the small/small combo and is MUCH easier on your components and no rub.

    And just a word of advice, if your derailleur is shifting properly DON'T mess with the limit screws unless you know what you are doing!!! Derailleur adjustment isn't rocket science, but if you don't know what you are about, you'll mess it up beyond recovery. Then it's a trip to the shop to have them sort it out, and it'll cost you some $ to have them do it. I work at a shop and about 80% of the derailleur adjustments that we do for people are because they thought they could do it themselves and hosed it. If you want to get into wrenching your own bike that's cool. But have someone experienced teach you how it's done. It'll save allot of headaches, time and money!

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by broz
    If you are going little ring in front to little ring in back, that is likely to cause rubbing that can't be eliminated. It may also cause your chain to skip,

    If you are going little to big, this should be possible without rubbing and you should either adjust your limit screw and/or determine whether you have a bent spider.
    yeah it's little cog in back with little cog in front, causing the chain to be at a sort of an angle.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by Squash
    a NO NO!!! It's called cross chaining and is BAD for the chain and the drive train. The severe angle of the chain puts excess stress on the chain and the cogs. It'll wear them out quick if you use this comgination allot. There are very few bikes out there that won't rub in the small ring/small cog combination, or in the large ring/large cog combination for that matter! It is not uncommon for the chain to rub the front derailleur cage in extreme gear combinations like that.

    If you want that particular gear ratio there is an equivalent. Shift to the middle ring in the front and then shift two cogs up in the back (7th gear). That will give you the same gear ratio as the small/small combo and is MUCH easier on your components and no rub.

    And just a word of advice, if your derailleur is shifting properly DON'T mess with the limit screws unless you know what you are doing!!! Derailleur adjustment isn't rocket science, but if you don't know what you are about, you'll mess it up beyond recovery. Then it's a trip to the shop to have them sort it out, and it'll cost you some $ to have them do it. I work at a shop and about 80% of the derailleur adjustments that we do for people are because they thought they could do it themselves and hosed it. If you want to get into wrenching your own bike that's cool. But have someone experienced teach you how it's done. It'll save allot of headaches, time and money!

    Good Dirt
    Would the manual explain how to do this? Basically I want to be able to take a frame and assemble a bike completely from scratch and I'm wondering if all the manuals provided with the components would be sufficient or not.

  7. #7
    Brant-C.
    Reputation: bcaronongan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,007
    manuals will let you build a bike from scratch; but it takes experience (and research on the web) to dial in everything.
    I just like riding my mountain bike.

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,026
    Quote Originally Posted by imzjustplayin
    Would the manual explain how to do this? Basically I want to be able to take a frame and assemble a bike completely from scratch and I'm wondering if all the manuals provided with the components would be sufficient or not.
    Sort of. Better to have it shown/taugh to you, too. The right "feel" can not be shown in a book.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •