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  1. #1
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    Can't get older, locked pedals off

    What's the best way to get that initial wrench turn on a locked-up pedal? I don't think it was over tightened, just old and been on there for a while. I heard a few drops of tri-flow might do it...

    Always appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Might be something you already know.... left pedal has a reverse thread.

    My favorite penetrating solution is ATF/Acetone in a 50/50 mix - YMMV.

  3. #3
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    are you using a pedal wrench and turning the right way? make sure you get good leverage, pull up on one crank while you push the wrench down on the other side. if that fails try a buddy, a breaker bar, and some penatrating oil.

  4. #4
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    Penetrating oil would be my first try, along with leaving it on over night or a significantly long time. If you're not in a hurry, add a couple of drops each day and tap the axle with a wrench or something.

    If you're in a hurry, hit the axle with a torch, get it hot hot hot, let it cool completely down and give it a try. The metal contracting while it cools can often break the seal if it's corroded. Don't thy this if you have carbon cranks..... lol.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    are you using a pedal wrench and turning the right way? make sure you get good leverage, pull up on one crank while you push the wrench down on the other side. if that fails try a buddy, a breaker bar, and some penatrating oil.

    Yep, it's all about getting in the best leverage position.

  6. #6
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    Take a toe strap and tie it around the crank arm and your seat tube, then make SURE you're turning the wrench the correct way. Penetrating oil is something I've only had to use once in the last 25 plus years.

    Al

  7. #7
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    I've actually had good luck (when the flats are in the right position) with just having the wrench next to the crank, and kind of squeezing them together - that way the force you're putting on one side is actually countered by the force from the other side. But then, I don't do them up insanely tight in the first place, so they're never that hard to get off.

    My money is on the left hand thread.

  8. #8
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    More torque is the name of the game. You can get hex attachments for socket wrenches. I have a large socket wrench with a long handle that has gotten mine off when frustratingly stuck.

  9. #9
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    +1 to the method OutLore describes. And add a thin film of grease to the threads when you put new pedals back on
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutLore View Post
    I've actually had good luck (when the flats are in the right position) with just having the wrench next to the crank, and kind of squeezing them together - that way the force you're putting on one side is actually countered by the force from the other side. But then, I don't do them up insanely tight in the first place, so they're never that hard to get off.

    My money is on the left hand thread.
    This
    OG Ripley v2
    Carver 420 TI

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutLore View Post
    Might be something you already know.... left pedal has a reverse thread.

    My favorite penetrating solution is ATF/Acetone in a 50/50 mix - YMMV.
    The correct direction for removing pedals is to point the crank to the back of the bike and then the wrench to the back, and push down. Works on both sides.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryman View Post

    If you're in a hurry, hit the axle with a torch, get it hot hot hot, let it cool completely down and give it a try. The metal contracting while it cools can often break the seal if it's corroded. Don't thy this if you have carbon cranks..... lol.
    I've heard that you heat the crank arm and that the aluminum will expand more than the steel axle.

  13. #13
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    You don't need a great deal of heat, a heat gun is plenty and even putting it in the sun can help if it's cold. It expands and contracts a lot even at ambient temperatures.
    The threads are prone to galvanic corrosion (aluminium being steel's beech) which speeds up exponentially with electrolyte (moisture) which is why it's always a good idea to lube or loctite them to seal it out.

    (edit: puritanical word filter got the female dog)

  14. #14
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    make shift breaker bar using pvc over your wrench can give you extra torque.

    I had to take a crankset off recently and put the arm into a vise to get the pedal off.

  15. #15
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    Pvc ain't gonna work

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