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  1. #1
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    Campy ISO Disc Hubs

    Does anyone make Campy Road Compatible Disc Hubs? I'm thinking of building a killer rigid city bike with Campy Flat Bar and Mechanical Discs.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    White Industries may do it for you.
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  3. #3
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    DT/Hugi Will

    They have in the past.

    Pretty much any company that offers disc hubs and road hubs available in either Campy or Shimano spline can do that for you.
    *** --- *** --- ***

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by morrisond
    Does anyone make Campy Road Compatible Disc Hubs? I'm thinking of building a killer rigid city bike with Campy Flat Bar and Mechanical Discs.

    Thanks
    You could be able to do it by getting some Mavic Crossmax wheels and swapping the freehub for a Ksyrium one. I don't think it would be that hard to shorten the axle length. To use 700c wheels it would be trickier since you'd have to swap the hub on a set of Ksyriums. Chris King also has an official, unnoficial guide on how to run campy cassettes on their 130mm road hubs. You'd have to change the shell to the disc one. I don't think any of these options are really cost effective and getting the seperate parts could prove dificult. I'm sure there are better options but nothing comes to mind right now.

  5. #5
    chips & bier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne
    They have in the past.

    Pretty much any company that offers disc hubs and road hubs available in either Campy or Shimano spline can do that for you.
    I'm not 100% sure about this, but I think a Campy-compatible DT240s road body will on a DT240s disc hub. Otherwise, using a Shimano 10-speed cogset on a regular 240s should do the trick, as the spacing and tooth thickness is practically the same (I think....
    )

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by morrisond
    Does anyone make Campy Road Compatible Disc Hubs? I'm thinking of building a killer rigid city bike with Campy Flat Bar and Mechanical Discs.

    Thanks
    Get whatever shimano compatible wheel and use an american classic cassette which is campy compatible with shimano splines.

    http://www.amclassic.com/Cassettes.html

  7. #7
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    Thought of the conversion Casette but very heavy at 324 grams for 12-28. Good idea though.

    Anyone know if I could put a Tune Campy Road Cassette Carrier on a King/Kong?

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hecubus
    You could be able to do it by getting some Mavic Crossmax wheels and swapping the freehub for a Ksyrium one. I don't think it would be that hard to shorten the axle length. To use 700c wheels it would be trickier since you'd have to swap the hub on a set of Ksyriums...
    Or start with the SpeedCity wheels (if the FH bodies can be swapped).
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Or start with the SpeedCity wheels (if the FH bodies can be swapped).
    Good call. I had completely forgotten about those. The SeedCity's use the same FTS-L freehub system as the Ksyrium/Crossmax so it should be compatible.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    White Industries may do it for you.
    I just tried putting a campy freehub body on a White Industries disc hub and did work but the axle spacing is now 137.5. So it works just not purfect.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ligero
    I just tried putting a campy freehub body on a White Industries disc hub and did work but the axle spacing is now 137.5. So it works just not purfect.
    If I'm getting a custom frame could I just nt have them make it 137.5 in the rear?

  12. #12
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by morrisond
    If I'm getting a custom frame could I just nt have them make it 137.5 in the rear?
    Sure. Why not?
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  13. #13
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    What makes the Hub now137.5? Would it bind or is the axle 137.5 as well?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by morrisond
    What makes the Hub now137.5? Would it bind or is the axle 137.5 as well?
    The Campy body and drive side axle end cap is 2.5mm wider then Shimano. SO when you take a hub that is made for Shimano and put a Campy freehub on it, it makes it 2.5mm wider on the drive side. It will still fit in most frames because 2.5mm is not that far to spread the frame to get the wheel in.
    I run 36's!

  15. #15
    Au'Right!
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    DT Hubs are not cross compatible. i.e. a Shimano freehub will not work on a DT campy hub and vise versa. The hub shell widths are different. And let me tell you it's damn inconvienient.

  16. #16
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    Campagnolo Adventure Bike

    I'm glad I'm not the only one trying to build such a machine!

    After six months of careful thought and considerable research, I am now embarking on building what I call an Adventure Bike. I have been riding for over 30 years and have seen the bike industry change dramatically. Despite the changes, there are some things that remain the same.

    First of all, bikes should be fun. I'm amazed at how much effort it requires to be competitive these days! I live in Snoqualmie, Washington in a beautiful valley where three rivers braid together before cascading down a waterfall taller than Niagara falls. Yet I never fail to see cyclists riding through our network of roads and trails with their eyes glued to the 10 square feet or road in front of them. Where did the magic go? Why is everything about speed these days? How many missed views have been sacrificed to cadence and top speed?

    I digress...

    My experience as a cyclist comes from touring and it's becoming more difficult to find complete bikes that take the various needs of touring and exploring into account. Europe tends to have more of a market for this kind of riding, so many of us have to piece together the right kind of bike for our styles.

    I started out with a requirement for versatility - riding on paved roads, converted railroad beds and the urban potholes and curbs that touring and commuting always bring. I came to the conclusion that ONE setup would not meet all of these needs, so I came up with a solution that allows me to quickly swap a few components when my rides call for it.

    So I bought a Kona Sutra frameset (inexpensive Italian steel - Dedacciai) with sliding rear dropouts and disc mounts. I started with this inexpensive frame because I'm not sure I want to commit to disc brakes and the only way to know is to try them for yourself. Also, being a Road frame, it allowed me to explore the characteristics of a Road bike mixed with the componentry of a mountain bike. Eventually, I'll have a custom frame built, but I'd like it to be the result of my current experience.

    Here's the list so far:

    1. Wheelset:
    Hope XC Disc 36-hole Hubs (Campy Freehub Body from their Ti-Glide inventory)
    Sapim CX-Ray spokes (for the high fatigue life)
    Sapim Polyax Integrated Locking Nipples
    Velocity VXC 700 disc-specific 36-hole rim
    Velocity Veloplugs (instead of rim tape)

    Note: Hope doesn't currently produce a hubset that is Campy compatible, but they still have an invesntory of the freehub bodies from the Ti-Glide hubs a few years ago. Hope Tech Support has been great to work with!


    2. Drivetrain:
    Campagnolo 10-speed Racing Triple derailleurs (long-cage rear & braze-on front)
    FSA Gossamer MegaExo Triple Crankset with modified chainrings (30-39-48)
    MARCHISIO custom Campy cassette (get this...17-18-19-20-21-22-23-25-27-30!!!)

    Note: I rarely use my large chainring because I tend to coast whenever possible and take in the scenery. I wanted to decrease my chainring sizes a bit, but not so much that the Camp front derailleur would protest. Instead, I chose to address the gearing issues at the rear wheel. MARCHISIO (in Asti, Italy) gives flexibility in gearing where Campagnolo doesn't. They allow you to customize each individual cog to meet your needs and for me this means I can start my cogs at 17t instead of the Campy's largest 13t. This means I give up the higher end range of a road bike (which I do gladly) in exchange for closer steps between the medium-to-low range. It also give me a 30t large cog instead of Campy's 29t maximum. The result is between 4% and 5% all the way through the range, with the largest two cogs at 8% and 11% respectively.


    3. Cockpit: Two Setups!
    Setup #1 - On One Midge Bars with Campy 10-speed Mirage Ergo Brifters
    Setup #2 - On One Mary Bars with Campy 10-speed Mirage Flat Bar Brifters
    Thomson Stem (with Hope Vision Light-mounting faceplate)
    Thomson Seatpost
    Brooks B17 Saddle
    Brooks Leather Bar Wrap for Setup #1
    Brooks Leather Grips for Setup #2

    Note: Using Ritchey Quick-Connects on both the shift and brake cables, I can swap the Midge drop bars and the Ergo levers with the Mary Bars and the flat bar levers. Both sets of Brifters are 10-speed and use the QuickStep front indexing for the 2007 range. Also, both bars are 25.4mm at the stem so there's no need to swap stems.


    4. Brakes:
    Tektro Aquila Road Disc Brake Calipers
    Yokozuna Reaction Cables
    Hope Floating Disc Rotors (mated to the Hope XC hubs)

    Note: There aren't many mechanical Discs for Road levers yet, and since I want My Ergo Brifters and Flat Bar Brifters to pull the same, I'm looking for a good road-specific solution here. In the lower Campy lines, the Flat Bar Brifters come in two models - road caliper or v-brake. In the upper lines they only offer the road version. The Tektro Aquila's use Ball Bearings like the Avid's, but the brake pads have a 3-degree float that helps to eliminate minor fit and alignment issues between the caliper and rotors. PLus, I hate the red plastic adjuster on the Avid's - it's offensive. We'll see if any better solutions come to market in the coming year.

    5. Odds and Ends:
    Hope Headset
    Hope Seat Collar
    Hope Wheel Skewers
    Hope Vision LED Lights (stem-mounted)
    Soma Euro Fenders (breakaway mounts)
    Tubus Logo Expedition Rear Rack
    Tubus Logo Expedition Front Rack (modified for the Kona Project 2 fork as a mid-rider)
    Ortlieb RollerPlus Front and Rear panniers

    Note: The frame has been sent to a local framebuilder here in the Seattle area for some minor modifications and a new paint job (the Kona paint is severely lacking). The frame get a few changes (Rohloff-specific cable guides for when I want to try a Rohloff wheel with the sliding dropouts and Mary Bars) and the fork gets two threaded inserts brazed into the thru-hole at the fork crown (so I can use regular 5mm threaded bolts for fenders, etc.) and braze-on rack mounts on the lower leading edge of the fork blades (so I can mount the modified Tubus Expedition rack out of the way of disc tabs and fender eyelets). I sent a perfectly good Tubus Expedition Rear rack to the framebuilder as well to chop up and braze back together in a way that makes it a mid-rider rather than a low-rider. I'll post pics when they're done.

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
    Thanks for reading such a long post - I hope this contributes some solutions to the 700c/Disc/Campy challenge that's out there. I'd love some feedback or suggestions on my emerging bike. It should be back from the framebuilder and built up by Thanksgiving, so I'll post detailed pics when it's all complete (and before it's gets dirty)

    Thanks!

    Scott Campbell Thomson
    Snoqualmie, Washington USA

  17. #17
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    Oops - hit the post button.

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