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  1. #1
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    Bought SRAM X.0 twisters

    Just picked at the post office my new shifters - X.0 twisters that will come along my new 9.0 derailleur.
    I intend to install all of them myself, have proper bike stand and going to acquire few necessary tools that I don't have yet (cable cutter, chain tool, probably also torque wrench (not sure - its quite expensive)).
    The twisters arrived originally packaged, as expected (bought off Ebay, brand new) with the manual inside, however I found the manual pretty vague only containing very basic installation instructions and nothing about the actual usage.

    Playing a bit with the twisters, I turned them by clicks, all the way to the highest gear on each (9 and 3 respectively), however then wasn't able to twist them back to lower gears.
    Trying to do that I encounter quite a resistance, and afraid of breaking them should I apply more force.
    Do I miss something with their operation ?
    How properly to decrease the gears ? Is there any hidden push/pull or whatever to be done first ?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    AZ
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    It takes a bit more pressure to twist them back to to lower positions .

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS
    It takes a bit more pressure to twist them back to to lower positions .
    Which will be lower once they are connected to the derailleurs.
    mtbtires.com
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  4. #4
    AZ
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    Yep , when you install them they work effortlessly .

  5. #5
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    So, guys, shifting back (to lower gear) that twister should feel considerably harder then up when they are not yet installed ? But once properly tied up to the derailleur it makes noticeably easier ?

    BTW, they came with the cable installed. Is it long enough for most regular bikes (including for rear of course) or I'd be better to replace it with new, independent cable ?

  6. #6
    AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexzabr
    So, guys, shifting back (to lower gear) that twister should feel considerably harder then up when they are not yet installed ? But once properly tied up to the derailleur it makes noticeably easier ? Correct

    BTW, they came with the cable installed. Is it long enough for most regular bikes (including for rear of course) or I'd be better to replace it with new, independent cable ?
    It is long enough.






    .........

  7. #7
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    Great, thanks.
    Saves me a few coins on cables...

  8. #8
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    no need for a torque wrench either to install the shifters. You only need to snug the set screw just enough to keep the shifter body from rotating.

    A torque wrench is handy for other things tho...
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  9. #9
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    Good.
    I noted a decent torque wrench (even not really professional) costs quite a bit...so I'd better to learn what really needs that treatment before forking out a cash...

    BTW, the cable out hole on the twister is quite large (while the cable itself is thin), I guess the hole is intended to accommodate cable housing (so that the hose tube should get into the cable adjuster hole). If so, there will be need for sealing that (to prevent dirt getting inside the adjuster and the hose). Am I wrong ?

  10. #10
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    You'll need a cable end for the portion at the shifter end (as well as any other time the outer is cut). I've not found it necessary to have one of the o-ring-seal type ends there.
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

  11. #11
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    A cable husing FERRULE is what you need - LBS will give 'em to ya if you do business w/ them.
    I also use some heatshrink to keep out moisture grit...

    look close and you can see on the brake cables (I don't have shots of the shifter unfortunately)
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  12. #12
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    Thanks, your bike looks neat...:-)
    Time to snatch some heatshrink at work...LOL

    BTW, on your bike picture I notice the brake levers appear to be shifted off the handles so to reach them you apparently need to keep your hand grasping at the twister rather then on the handle itself....
    Am I wrong ?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexzabr
    Thanks, your bike looks neat...:-)
    Time to snatch some heatshrink at work...LOL

    BTW, on your bike picture I notice the brake levers appear to be shifted off the handles so to reach them you apparently need to keep your hand grasping at the twister rather then on the handle itself....
    Am I wrong ?
    yeah, I'm gripping the grip-shifts, no prob for me. I think it's a bit more ergonomically superior anyhow.
    plus, my hand is bigger than the shorter grip to boot
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  14. #14
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    Understood, thanks.
    Gripping the twisters - doesn't that shift the gear unintentionally at a times ?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexzabr
    Understood, thanks.
    Gripping the twisters - doesn't that shift the gear unintentionally at a times ?

    Never. Personally I had way more issues with the X-9 triggers with mis-shifts due to thumb vrs trigger positioning while gripping the handle bar.
    You're not likely to hold the Gripshifts in such a way to cause mis-shifts anyway simply due to the location on your bar and the design of them which ensures any shifting done is quite deliberate.
    I've neen running Gripshift almost exclusively on my XC & AM rigs for 5+ years and never once have had an unintended shift. They remain for me a first class shifter.

  16. #16
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    They're good to go right out of the box....the cable will be plenty long enough, no sealing around the cable exit is necessary, and be sure to put the indicator back in the '9' position while pulling on the cable so that it's ready for installation. Also, twist the triangular barrel adjuster all the way in, then back it out one full turn before you attach your cable.

    I've used various models of GS all the way back to the X-Ray models....today's GS are really nice, very smooth. Once you get it mounted on the handlebar and hooked up to the derailleur, you'll see that it doesn't take much effort to shift. The only times I unintentionally shift are when I fail/bail on a really steep tech climb and refuse to dismount before I'm falling over backwards. In that case, I usually rip the shifter 4, 5, 6 gears lower. No biggie....just put it back where it should go and spin the cranks. Never damaged anything in the process. A couple pairs of my GS have been through some horrendous crashes in dh rock gardens and come out shining. One of them lost the clear gear indicator cover but the shifter was just fine (and spares are available). I finally went with a Saint lever shifter for my jump bike, but all the trail bikes have GS....love em!

  17. #17
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    Thanks a lot.
    I'm trying to establish my understanding of proper installation sequence for both shifters and rear derailleur upon reading their instructions.
    Several points are still a bit vague to me:
    1. Installing front shifter - should I twist it to 3 or 1 positions prior to the installation ? What number means higher/lower gear i.e. what number corresponds to what chainring ? Also, twisting the barrel adjuster in/out - I guess I need to release the cable tension prior to installation, i.e. allow the longest cable length, so that turn the adjuster in the direction that relaxes the cable, right ?
    Do I understand correctly that front derailleur when shifting to largest ring works against cable tension or exactly opposite is correct ?
    The same is for rear one ?

    2. As for rear one: setting the shifter to 9 means releasing the cable tension ? If that is correct, I assume the rear derailleur also works outside against cable tension (shifting to outer cog means higher gear and achieved by allowing the derailleur's spring to extend when cable tension is released ?

    3. I'm putting medium cage 9.0 rear derailleur to my regular 11-32/22-44 27 gears rig, according to my calculations it will preclude me from using 3-4 gears when the chain is the most crossed (smallest/inner ring to 3-4 smallest/outer cogs), I'm fine with that.
    However, when installing and fitting chain length, the regular procedure of determining the proper chain length is to wrap it on opposite ring/cog (most crossed - biggest ring + biggest cog) measure until the to ends meet and then add two full links (or one quick link and one regular link).
    However, since I'll be using medium cage and aware the limitation of usable gears, is this rule still valid (bearing in mind I'll anyway have less coverage) ?
    Or it still valid due to the fact that the limitation prohibits small-small combination (and thereabouts) and chain length fitting is conducted on big-big combination ?

    Sorry for lots of stupid questions, I'm just trying to grasp a bit theory prior to getting to practice...:-)

  18. #18
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    That's a lot to try to reply to here. Do you have anyone that could walk you through it in person? Sounds as if you have a very good understanding of the way the parts work, so you shouldn't have any trouble installing them....it's very simple.

    So...

    As long as your rear derailleur is the normal type and not one of the quirky Shimano low-normal models, then the larger numbers on your shifters (any shifter) equal the cogs/rings that are harder to push. On the front, 1 is your granny and 3 is the large chainring. On the rear, 1 is the biggest/easiest cog and 9 is the smallest.

    Yes...turn in the barrel adjusters all the way and then back them out one full turn. This gives you maximum adjustability for cable tension for when the time comes to trim the indexing. If your rear derailleur has an adjusting barrel, turn it all the way in.

    Also, since you were turning the shifters without any spring tension on the cable, before you thread it through the cable housing and clamp it down, be sure to mount the shifters to the handlebar and snug them in place. Then use one hand to gently pull on the cable while you use the other hand to work the shifter back and forth....you'll feel it pull in cable as you rotate them backward (toward the saddle), and let out cable as you rotate them forward. Pull the cable as you position the shifters on 1-front and 9-rear (each one rotated all the way forward). Now you'll have all of the cable and slack removed from the shifter body and can thread it through the cable housing. Don't forget to put on your rubber donuts if you're using 'em.

    Your question #2: Yes, when you put your rear shifter at 9, it removes tension from the cable and the derailleur spring will pull the slack, shifting the chain down to the smallest cog and stopping on the high-limit screw setting on the derailleur body. The front derailleur works exactly the same way except that when the tension is relaxed, the front derailleur is on the smallest chainring/low-limit screw.

    #3: I would go ahead and run the normal long-cage for triple gearing, but if you're willing to be careful with your shifting then the mid-cage will work. Yes, set up the chain using the same method. The derailleur's job is to take up slack in the small gear combos so you should be just fine doing it the normal way. You might try cutting it long by a few links at first and setting it up to see if will gain an extra cross-chain gear for you...only if you want to play with it. I've set up a lot of derailleurs and drivetrains in all cage lengths road/mtb but I've never done a mid-cage on a triple like this so I'm not totally sure what a longer chain would do in that situation. Can't hurt to play around with it, though. You might play with the B-screw and see how that changes things (I'd adjust it normally and then see how it changes from there). If the derailleur can't take up the extra links then cut them out and use the normal measuring method that you described.

    Keep in mind that some rear suspension designs do better with 2-4 links rather than the usual 1-1/2 to 2 that's recommended...it depends on the rear wheel path as the suspension activates. If the chain is too short by a link or two (assuming the cable tension is set up correctly and the hanger is straight), then you may get some ghost shifting. Worst case scenario that I've witnessed 4 times on friends' bikes, is that a too short chain in the right gear combo can rip the derailleur apart at the mounting bolt when the suspension compresses, twisting up the cage, and maybe taking out a spoke or two in the carnage. I saw an X9, two X.0's, and one LX derailleur all die horrible deaths that way. The VPP and FSR designs like to have an extra link as well as a little extra housing length to keep all that from happening.

    Hope that helps some....no stupid questions, just ones that don't have quick answers!

  19. #19
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    Wow, thanks a lot, that's one comprehensive response..
    Well, yesterday I nevertheless went a head with front setup and installed front shifter.
    First played a bit with existing one (now former one) while bike is on stand and took a close look to how exactly it works with cable pulling/releasing and cage movement, that turned to be quite self-explanatory indeed, then it became clear to me how to setup the new one.
    The setup took approx. 20 minutes (while about half of that time spent trying hard to put the new handles that came with shifter). Adjustments were very easy and simple with cable tension. What was a bit unusual for me is that even though the front have only 3 gears to switch (and correspondingly only 3 clicks up/down on my former Doere shifter) the twister appears actually like the same as 9 speeds (lots of clicks) with only scale replaced widely spaced 1- 2 - 3. So that there are intermediate clicks of twist between each two adjacent front gears. That, in fact, acts kind of fine gear positioning adjustment ...:-) with almost no need for cable adjuster job...A bit later I figured though that I'd better to adjust the clean shifting to be exactly at the numbering position (rather then within few clicks here and there of he number), so set the speeds exactly on 1, 2, 3 and then adjusted cable tension by the adjuster to fit these.
    Now it seems to shift exactly at the intended numbers on the shifter scale leaving enough clearance off the front cage surface the chain not to rub against it on all but two most outer/inner rings.

    Now its time to prepare myself for rear derailleur/shifter installation...

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