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  1. #1
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    Hope Bigger inner ring question- verbose post

    Currently I'm running my stock 22-32-44 Shimano M 542/Deore crankset, sans 44, added bash and 12-36 casette on my GF RF1. Yes I'm a noob ,so bear with me on this simple one.
    This last weekend I found myself torn between the 32 and 22 as I was often at the low end of the 32s range(32x36) and also high end of 22s (22x14 maybe 12). I was fresh on the first lap when using the 32, but later found the 22 more comfortable.
    I guess that there is less cross chaining effect from using the middle, and if I were stronger it would probably be best to just stay with a 32 there. However before I jump on the 1X9 idea all together( man, that widget looks cool ), I'm contemplating trying out a cheap 26-28 for my inner, which will probably be more appropriate if I persist in being big ring lazy LOL. ( I wish I could put a 26-28 in the middle location and be done with it...)

    My question is- what is the difference between these two shimano sprockets and are there any other brand inner 26- 28 available out there that y'all could recommend??
    These are copy and paste from Jensens site- M572 and 580 compatible, and I'm assuming M542 compatible also??


    64mm x 26t Silver - 4 bolt
    Mfg #: use CR5813
    UPC #: 689228160958
    and
    4x64mm x 26t silver
    Mfg #: Y1DS26000
    UPC #: 689228156715

    I'm also contemplating a med cage RDR as my chain slap is atrocious when on the 22 especially, so bigger inner may be more appropriate match here too, right?(yes, I've read the stickie, and shortened chain to big big+2)
    Thanks for your time and consideration!
    Last edited by Noclutch; 11-17-2010 at 06:02 PM.

  2. #2
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    Some how this feels weird. Ok you have a standard triple with 12/36 why do you need to get a bigger small ring, all you have to do is shift to middle ring. Instead of spending money and time to do all this change, may be try learning the proper shifting.IMO

    Unless I'm missing some thing on your post. I just don't understand with the triple why would you run 22-14 gear combo instead 32-20. I can understand if you are looking for a 2x9 combo.

  3. #3
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    mimi1885-Well I sorta am looking at staying 2x9 for now and have been there for a while, but I'm thinking, that eventually 1x9 with the right "1" will do what I need in any situation I run into. At last weekends race there were several hills that 32x36 was barely low enough for me and I never got near 32xlow teens in the flats. But on the second lap the hills were good using the 22 mids( honestly never looked as I was huffing and puffing ) but in the few faster straights 22x14 was ok before dropping back into the hills with switchbacks at the bottoms
    But yea, I do hate shifting the FDR( and simultaneously the rear to compensate some) though it works fine it still is slow and clunky compared to the rear. So I'm thinking an upper 20's front would fit the bill in a 1x9, or maybe just make for a more useful inner on a 2x9. At my XC oriented regular riding place I rarely go to 22 and only for isolated techy sections, and at this hilly other place, 32 is overkill much of the time unless I'm feeling spunky. Just don't need the very bottom end of the ranges, nor the very top ( hense the bash vs waste of space 44)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclutch
    mimi1885-Well I sorta am looking at staying 2x9 for now and have been there for a while, but I'm thinking, that eventually 1x9 with the right "1" will do what I need in any situation I run into. At last weekends race there were several hills that 32x36 was barely low enough for me and I never got near 32xlow teens in the flats. But on the second lap the hills were good using the 22 mids( honestly never looked as I was huffing and puffing ) but in the few faster straights 22x14 was ok before dropping back into the hills with switchbacks at the bottoms
    But yea, I do hate shifting the FDR( and simultaneously the rear to compensate some) though it works fine it still is slow and clunky compared to the rear. So I'm thinking an upper 20's front would fit the bill in a 1x9, or maybe just make for a more useful inner on a 2x9. At my XC oriented regular riding place I rarely go to 22 and only for isolated techy sections, and at this hilly other place, 32 is overkill much of the time unless I'm feeling spunky. Just don't need the very bottom end of the ranges, nor the very top ( hense the bash vs waste of space 44)

    so you are running 2x9 as you have dished the 44t ring. My best advise to you is to practice shifting. It's essential part of riding and racing. I have a few bikes I set up 2x9 and one is with Hammerschmidt. It's awesome.

    Of course 1x9 is best if you don't like shifting. You can find 30t middle ring. or you can be creative and add 39t cog, it would make things more interesting.

  5. #5
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    I don't know what your shift pattern is like. If you're ending up in gears like 22x14 or 32x36, though, it doesn't sound like it's working that well for you.

    I generally treat my small, middle and large rings as gear ranges. If I'm climbing in the saddle, I use my little ring. On flat or rolling singletrack, I use my middle ring. On a road or a descent, I use my big ring. I notice above you've removed your large ring. So that's a non-issue.

    Of course from time to time I make exceptions - I'm more of a spinner, so sometimes the big ring is too high a ratio for me on a false flat descent with switchbacks unless I'm cross-chaining pretty badly, and it can be a little high on the road, depending on what I'm doing and whether or not I'm climbing. But I'm generally quite comfortable with that shift pattern, and it almost always lands me around the middle of the cassette. I also like the size of the shift from granny to middle ring - it's about right for getting out of the saddle on a climb (be careful if you do this - you need to unload your pedal to make the shift) and it's usually a gear I can get on top of when I crest a hill and want to open up the throttle.

    I sometimes think about a setup with fewer rings myself, but I don't really want to throw a bunch of money at a drivetrain that's working well for me. Maybe when I wear out the 44t, I'll get a chain guard instead.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    Thanks guys.
    mimi- Hmm, a 30 is an idea- didn't even know they existed? Do you know who does them? Yea the hammerschmidt is a cool idea. Cooler if they made a lightweight/XC sorta version that cost less too.
    Andrwswitch- have no idea how SS guys do it! Fortunately I ride no roads, and descents in Florida are shallow relative to many states. But they are short and technical at times. So my 44 was useless, but I was hanging up on logs and bonking rocks regularly.
    So can anyone comment on the different shimano sprockets listed above? They caught my eye also because they are only $10! Would any 64 BCD fit? I see that Race Face also makes some that size but seem to be in short supply.

  7. #7
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    Any 64 bcd ring will fit in the smaller position... the difference in rings is usually the material they're made from - aluminum vs. steel... steel last longer and is heavier... the little ring has a fair amount of torque on it so I'd go with a steel one.

    I'm a fan of the 1x9 myself and I live in Colorado, and I'm a recovering singlespeeder ( ). Frankly a 1x9 with a 30 would work fine - but you may spin out after riding a bit. You'll need to find that with a bit of searching... a 30t is the smallest ring that'll fit on the 104 bcd (middle position).

    Here's a link to a ramped and pinned 30T that you could use with your 22.
    http://www.hammerheadbikes.com/forum...hp?topic=805.0

    If you decide on a 1x9 setup you'll need a ring that has no ramps or pins - Blackspire makes them and they can be had at many local shops or online - I like Pricepoint or Speedgoat... there are plenty of options online. Start with the 30t if you can find on at a reasonable price, and my guess is that after a bit of practice - you'll want a 32 - but I could be wrong (I frequently am ).

    Best of luck and let us know what you settle on.

    S
    "You know how they make aluminum bike frames? They take steel and suck out all the soul..."

  8. #8
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    Deore LX rings are nice.

    I had a problem mounting one on an M542 crank a couple of years ago, but I was trying to mount it in the middle position. I think that the small rings all have flat faces and it was the beveling, etc., that made it difficult to mount the middle ring. So either of the ones you list should be fine. I hear Florida's pretty flat, although I can't say I know it very well. So it could just be a matter of finding the right '1' for a 1x9 setup. I read an interesting article a while ago in which a team mechanic commented that people on a 1x9 or 2x9 setup always had a chainring they really liked, if they liked their setup, and how many teeth it had was somewhat individual.

    "Single Speed" is a bit of a misnomer. Those guys have quite a few speeds at their disposal - sitting, standing, running/walking, coasting, and dead. So it's really more like a six-speed drivetrain. I think that single speed riders who are good at it are really good at carrying speed, have really good form pedaling out of the saddle, have a wide cadence range, and have a gear ratio they really like.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    steverenno- thanks for the BCD info and link. I'm probably going to just do the 26 on small ring first and keep my stock 32, then see if what I really want is somewhere inbetween( like a widget ). Yea, Florida as little elevation for sure, untill you get into old limerock quarries/tilling piles. Then it can get ugly and quickly. But when doing a couple of hours of XC at my local system, I probably spend 95% of the time @32-16/18/21 on smooth single track by and large.
    Andrw- 6 speed SS LOL. Yes their skillz must be elevated and/or be animals!

  10. #10
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    You may want to ride a little longer before changing parts and spending money. Since you state your a beginner and 32/36 is pretty low especially riding on basically flat trails, you need to give yourself some time to get in riding shape. I think if you give it a few months you'll forget the small chain ring is even there and be good with the 32.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclutch
    steverenno- thanks for the BCD info and link. I'm probably going to just do the 26 on small ring first and keep my stock 32, then see if what I really want is somewhere inbetween( like a widget ). Yea, Florida as little elevation for sure, untill you get into old limerock quarries/tilling piles. Then it can get ugly and quickly. But when doing a couple of hours of XC at my local system, I probably spend 95% of the time @32-16/18/21 on smooth single track by and large.
    Andrw- 6 speed SS LOL. Yes their skillz must be elevated and/or be animals!

    I think Andrwswitch is right on to what you need, but it's not cheap a cheap mod. Singlespeed hub would accept up to 6 cog cassette you can have gears that cover a lot of your range, so a search. I'm still in search of a good deal on a SS hub. It's stronger dishless wheel too.

    As for the 30t there's a company I came across they make middle ring, from 28, 30, 32. It's not cheap but really cool.New Single ChainRing/Guide Setup Available for Mojo

    If the 26t is only $10 you just cant beat that.

  12. #12
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    I just bought one of those 26t Shimano rings; I should have it next week

    I'm building up a faster, lighter xc bike to compliment my main ride which is slowly getting burlier and heavier. 26t granny will be get me a bit more extra low climbing ability than the 1x9 I'm used to while being high enough to be more useful than a 22t granny across the top half of the cassette for a range of trail conditions besides steep uphill

    I'm combining this with a 36t large ring for more top-end speed and to keep a decent difference between my two rings.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I just bought one of those 26t Shimano rings; I should have it next week

    I'm building up a faster, lighter xc bike to compliment my main ride which is slowly getting burlier and heavier. 26t granny will be get me a bit more extra low climbing ability than the 1x9 I'm used to while being high enough to be more useful than a 22t granny across the top half of the cassette for a range of trail conditions besides steep uphill

    I'm combining this with a 36t large ring for more top-end speed and to keep a decent difference between my two rings.

    I know what you mean about the ride getting burlier and heavier, you get so hooked with beefy forks and tires, they let you have max fun on the way down. Good work out too on the way up, though I enjoy climbing on my light bike but i don't mind punishing myself on the heavier one, it feels rewarding somehow, weird

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    I know what you mean about the ride getting burlier and heavier, you get so hooked with beefy forks and tires, they let you have max fun on the way down. Good work out too on the way up, though I enjoy climbing on my light bike but i don't mind punishing myself on the heavier one, it feels rewarding somehow, weird
    Yep! My Inbred 29er is currently sitting around 30lbs with Dissent 2.5 front, Purgatory 2.4 rear, remote seatpost, and a heavy but super stiff Tora. Tons of fun for my crazy home trails and I can still stay ahead of my friends on the climbs, but the setup loses its appeal when those trails close for bad conditions and I ride much smoother trails, fireroads or even back roads instead

  15. #15
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    Boom- which 26 did you get and for what crank? I assume that they are all flat and with no offset, correct? Still can't figure out the difference between them... except thatl one is $11 and one is $10

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclutch
    Boom- which 26 did you get and for what crank? I assume that they are all flat and with no offset, correct? Still can't figure out the difference between them... except thatl one is $11 and one is $10
    4x64mm x 26t silver
    Mfg #: Y1DS26000
    because it was a dollar cheaper

    They are just from different model years. They are both compatible with all standard 104/64bcd cranks and should have no offset. There is likely no discernible difference between the two rings.

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