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  1. #1
    "I declare Martian Law!"
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    Best Pedals For Ease of Release (i.e. falling)?

    I've been riding on the generic Nashbar SPD pedals for about a year. They do their job well, but are very hard to release laterally (when I'm falling). Adjusting the tension makes clipping in easier, but usually alows my foot to pop out during a rough climb with no effect on the lateral release (i.e. I still fall).

    I'm getting a new bike and don't want to beat it up, so I'm going to invest in some new pedals. I'm not concerned about the weight -- just that they're easy to get in and out of . From reading reviews, it seems that the Crank Bros. Candys might work. Anybody have any experience with these? What's everybody's recommendation?

    Thanks,

    Chris

  2. #2
    JmZ
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    I'm on Eggies

    And started riding 'em after about 2 hours in a parking lot.

    I can count the number of times I've fallen without unclipping and falling because I didn't unclip on one hand and still have a couple of fingers to spare.

    These are my first set of clipless pedals too. So I've had no problems.

    JmZ


    Quote Originally Posted by Creelove
    I've been riding on the generic Nashbar SPD pedals for about a year. They do their job well, but are very hard to release laterally (when I'm falling). Adjusting the tension makes clipping in easier, but usually alows my foot to pop out during a rough climb with no effect on the lateral release (i.e. I still fall).

    I'm getting a new bike and don't want to beat it up, so I'm going to invest in some new pedals. I'm not concerned about the weight -- just that they're easy to get in and out of . From reading reviews, it seems that the Crank Bros. Candys might work. Anybody have any experience with these? What's everybody's recommendation?

    Thanks,

    Chris
    JmZ

    From one flat land to another.

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  3. #3
    "I declare Martian Law!"
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    I was leaning towards the Candys for my mtn bike and Eggbeaters for my road bike. Any problems with the pedals that you've noticed? I've read that the cleats wear quickly. Anything else?

    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by JmZ
    And started riding 'em after about 2 hours in a parking lot.

    I can count the number of times I've fallen without unclipping and falling because I didn't unclip on one hand and still have a couple of fingers to spare.

    These are my first set of clipless pedals too. So I've had no problems.

    JmZ

  4. #4
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    IMHO, Shimano pedals are by far the easiest to get in and out of under dry conditions. I'd recommend the 540's for the best bang for your buck. Excellent pedal under 95% of conditions, and far better than older Shimano models in the muck. I steer newbie clipless riders to Shimanos without question.

    In terms of consistency, Times and Eggs always seem to require the same effort to get into and out of under all conditions (including nasty mud), but they require more pressure to get in and out than Shimanos. I'm pretty comfortable getting out of my pedals, and I'll happily trade the extra effort for consistency under all conditions.
    Last edited by bikerx40; 05-17-2005 at 07:27 AM.
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  5. #5
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    Time Atacs!

  6. #6
    "I declare Martian Law!"
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    From the reviews, it seems like Time Atacs are very hard to get out of. How do they compare to Crank Bros Eggbeaters/Candys?

  7. #7
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Speedplay Hands Down!

    There is no retention mechanism; your feet just naturally fall out.
    Actually you have to get used to that and concentrate on keeping your feet in the pedals at first. However it becomes second nature after a few rides.

    I would advise against Eggbeaters on your roadbike unless you dont ride very long/far on it. The very small contact area is harsh on the feet. (read pain and numbness)
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  8. #8
    Wizard of the Trail
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    shimano 540s
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creelove
    I've been riding on the generic Nashbar SPD pedals for about a year. They do their job well, but are very hard to release laterally (when I'm falling). Adjusting the tension makes clipping in easier, but usually alows my foot to pop out during a rough climb with no effect on the lateral release (i.e. I still fall).

    I'm getting a new bike and don't want to beat it up, so I'm going to invest in some new pedals. I'm not concerned about the weight -- just that they're easy to get in and out of . From reading reviews, it seems that the Crank Bros. Candys might work. Anybody have any experience with these? What's everybody's recommendation?

    Thanks,

    Chris
    I would stay away from Eggbeaters and non-adjustable Times. You can't adjust the release tension with them, its a one size fits all proposition. Also the wide float on both pedals makes it seem like you need to twist twice as far to get out them. I haven't ridden on Shimanos in 8 years because they suck in the mud but i remember when adjusted properly they were easy to get into and out of under ideal conditions.

    You have any friends with other pedals for you to try out in the parking lot? Pretty much convinced some of mine to stay away from Eggs and Times after a parking lot try.

  10. #10
    Wizard of the Trail
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    with the 520, 540 and 959 shimanos, mud is not a problem.
    There is no charge for awesomeness......or attractiveness.

    Good rep does not wash out the bad, nor the bad the good.

  11. #11
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    I don't know anyone with Times or Crank Bros., but I have read that there is a lot of float, which worries me. I might see if I can find some Shimano M520s. They usually come stock on bikes and people are always getting rid of them.

    Thanks

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne
    There is no retention mechanism; your feet just naturally fall out.
    Actually you have to get used to that and concentrate on keeping your feet in the pedals at first. However it becomes second nature after a few rides.
    I don't like Speed Plays. They have too much float in them so you have to turn your heel out very far for them to release. I have seen people fall with these pedals and not clip out and I personally wouldn't use them. SPDs only require a little bit of rotation to release.

  13. #13
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    Sometimes all you have to do.....

    is ride and keep riding till you get it. Can't imagine you are pulling out on the upstroke unless you are not riding smoothly and twisting your feet. It has to become second nature and the only way it is going to be that way is to ride. I have ridden Shimano, Bebop, Mallets.....basically all the same, after an hour you get used to them all. Let's not be technocrats about such a simple thing. Pull up smoothly to pedal, twist to get out, nothing to it.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creelove
    I've been riding on the generic Nashbar SPD pedals for about a year. They do their job well, but are very hard to release laterally (when I'm falling). Adjusting the tension makes clipping in easier, but usually alows my foot to pop out during a rough climb with no effect on the lateral release (i.e. I still fall).

    I'm getting a new bike and don't want to beat it up, so I'm going to invest in some new pedals. I'm not concerned about the weight -- just that they're easy to get in and out of . From reading reviews, it seems that the Crank Bros. Candys might work. Anybody have any experience with these? What's everybody's recommendation?

    Thanks,

    Chris
    I only have Shimanos so my experience in this regard is narrow. However, I firmly believe it is the rider and not the pedals that make the difference such that your experience should dictate how easy / quickly you can get out of your pedals. Though I am far from an expert, I am certainly at the point where I can virtually immediately get out of my pedals. I highly recommend the 540s or 959s if you are a bike snob like me.

  15. #15
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    Another vote for the Shimano pedals

    In my group of riding friends the Shimano's are hands-down the winner. I started on SPDs almost 10 years ago. I switched for about 2 months to Time ATACs and absolutely could not get used to the release mechanism on them. I'm now using the 959s and I love them. Granted that we don't have real thick mud to deal with in my neck of the woods, so that eliminates the weakness that I most often hear cited about the SPDs. My fiancee just started riding last year, and after two rides she started using the Shimano 540s. For the most part its been a painless learning curve for her and she is very comfortable with the release mechanism.

    For what its worth, a co-worker once ignored my advice and bought the Nashbar pedals. Granted that this was a few years ago, but regardless of how much I loosened the tension on them, she could not get out of her pedals. I would definitely argue that pedals are not a good place to go for generic parts.

  16. #16
    "I declare Martian Law!"
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    Thanks for all the input. How do the Shimano M520's compare to the Shimano M540's? I will probably be replacing both my road and mtn bike pedals, so I'm tring to do it on a budget. Is there a big difference?

    Thanks

  17. #17
    Wizard of the Trail
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creelove
    Thanks for all the input. How do the Shimano M520's compare to the Shimano M540's? I will probably be replacing both my road and mtn bike pedals, so I'm tring to do it on a budget. Is there a big difference?

    Thanks
    i think its just weight difference. 520s are heavier. i have both pairs and don't notice anything different.
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  18. #18
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    Probably not much of a difference.

    I don't have any experience with the 520 pedals, but I've used both the 540s and the 959s and I can't say that I've noticed any difference in terms of performance. I'd strongly recommend looking on Ebay. We got the 540s for around $63, and I'm sure if you go for the 520s they'd be significantly cheaper than retail as well.

  19. #19
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    Pd M540

    The m540's are a proven performer. With the spring tension adjustment set to mininum they are super easy to bail out .




    Gary

  20. #20
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    Good job! Go with the Time ATACs

    Time ATACs hands down are the best clipless pedals ever, I've had little problems getting in and out of them, even when situations get hairy I can unclip them very fast with no problems. Initially and only initially are they a little more difficult to get in and out of, but after they are broken in, they are so simple to get in and out of, and I'm using the Time ATAC Alium S models. Also another thing is is that you have to put the cleats in on the right side, one set up gives you 13 degree release and the other give 17 degree release, which makes you more secure in the pedal but more difficult to get out of.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creelove
    From the reviews, it seems like Time Atacs are very hard to get out of. How do they compare to Crank Bros Eggbeaters/Candys?
    None are adjustable...
    I got rid of my ATACs because they had too much float for me, which made release in a hurry more difficult (you have to turn your foot further than say SPDs).

    If you're concerned about easy release, it's probably worth getting adjustable pedals (SPDs, Xpedos, etc)

  22. #22
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    Another vote for ATACs... I have 3 of them on my various bikes. All have been good, it might take a bit getting used to them but I pop in and out of them pretty easily. The float is an individual thing, I have bad knees so the float is beneficial for me.

  23. #23
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    ATACs

    several years ago, I switched from shimano to time and have never looked back. my problems with the shimanos were similar to what you are describing: i often had trouble clipping out when i needed to, and i sometimes would clip out when i didn't want to.

    With the ATACs, i can put my foot down as quickly as if i were not clipped in at all. Plus, for me, they are easier to get into (nice big hook to grab your cleat).

    I guess different things feel right to different people. my recommendation: try before you buy. maybe your LBS would let you demo some.
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  24. #24
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    I tried a bunch of them and returned or sold them all before I got the Speedplay Frogs. That was my last set before going back to the Toeclips. Anyway, so far they have been great and are easily the easiest to get out of and extremely easy to get into. There is NO retention mechanism so it is incredibly nice for the knees.

    In technical/rocky sections downhill, I press my heels in a bit to lock in (I'm paranoid) and I have never clipped out unintentionally. I've fallen once when a rock stopped me cold and I forgot how to clip out in that split second- I was trying to pull my foot out as in toeclips.

    I like them enough that I got a second set for my roadbike. The Times were hard for me to get out of and the Shimanos were unpredictable, especially with the release- granted I have not tries the 959s but I can't afford to try them all, you know

    Oh, the Frogs are a bit different- just twisting out requires a bit more movement than if you lift your heel while twisting out- if you lift your heel a bit while twisting out, you're out faster than you realize. Someday, I'll try the 959s, I guess. I've heard good things about them and here in Colorado, mud isn't a problem.

  25. #25
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Here's A Quick Test To Try

    Get together with a bunch of riding buddies that have different pedal systems.
    Have them each clip one empty shoe onto their bike.
    Now, everybody lean their bike to the side the shoe is on.

    Which shoes fell out by themselves? Those would be the easiest to get out of now wouldn't they?
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