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Thread: Best grip shift

  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by empre View Post
    Well I assumed since they move so easily without even being installed. There is play on the grips before the snap for gear change. Old shifters don't have that play. They just snap when you turn hard enough.
    You can't judge how any shifter is going to perform until you install and correctly adjust the cable / mech. They are designed to be operated with tension in the cable between the shifter and mechs. I prefer trigger shifters but I've ridden a mates AM set up with X0 grip shifts and they seem pretty solid to me no mis shifting or looseness noted

  2. #152
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    So are you saying that the shifter doesn't move at all before it snaps and changes the gear? It seems that it has gradually growing resistance before the shifter snaps to a new gear (=play).

  3. #153
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    The old 8-speed Grip Shifts from the 90's didn't have the growing resistance before snapping into gear -- the cable moved as the grip moved toward the next detent.

    The SRAM Attack shifters do have the spring resistance before snapping into a higher gear (smaller cog). So do the 9-speed SRAM twisters, like X0. I haven't used the new 10-speed twisters, but I assume they do too.

    I used twist shifters since the early 90's and always preferred them, but I think a lot of it depends on what you are used to. In the past year I have switched to the new XT triggers and really like them. With the new features like vivid indexing, multi-release, instant release, and 2-way release, they really are nice.

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu View Post
    The old 8-speed Grip Shifts from the 90's didn't have the growing resistance before snapping into gear -- the cable moved as the grip moved toward the next detent.
    .
    9 speed as well.I think it changed around 2000 or 2001. I prefer the style you are describing (it is also what the OP bought). I think they shift faster.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  5. #155
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    Is there 9 speed grips that doesn't have that growing resistance?

  6. #156
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    I don't have the time to read all 7 pages of this thread so I apologize if this has already been mentioned, but my favorite shifter of all time and what I run on both my current mountan bikes: Vintage SRAM 5.0 9-speed shorty shifters (cheap on ebay). These have the lowest profile of any SRAM 8 or 9-speed shifter I have found. Cut down the rubber grip shift section cut to about 20-25mm with a hacksaw (yes, shortened shorty's) and mount these up with full length Odi Rogue lock-on grips and you have the perfect cockpit.

    I don't know what SRAM is thinking with the new 10-speed gripshift, but the new models over engineering and pricing is rediculous.

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbf View Post
    I don't have the time to read all 7 pages of this thread so I apologize if this has already been mentioned, but my favorite shifter of all time and what I run on both my current mountan bikes: Vintage SRAM 5.0 9-speed shorty shifters (cheap on ebay). .
    This is pretty much what the OP ended up buying.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by empre View Post
    Is there 9 speed grips that doesn't have that growing resistance?
    Try removing the return spring that helps pushing the downshifts.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
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  9. #159
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    I think I will just try to find one of those old 3x8 shifters and switch the 9 speed cassette to 8 speed.

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    You can't judge how any shifter is going to perform until you install and correctly adjust the cable / mech. They are designed to be operated with tension in the cable between the shifter and mechs. I prefer trigger shifters but I've ridden a mates AM set up with X0 grip shifts and they seem pretty solid to me no mis shifting or looseness noted

    Ditto. The shifters out of the box feel nothing like they do on the bike, with derailleur spring tension on the cable. You can't tell how you will like them by holding them in your hand and twisting them.

  11. #161
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    I'm hoping that SRAM will slightly adjust the older style 9 speed grip shifts and offer them up next year. These new XO and XX versions just seem over engineered and expensive.

  12. #162
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    SRAM is quite good about pushing technology down. However, you aren't going to see new 9 speed. I think you'll see some X9 and maybe X9 3x10 and 2x10 twisters within a year. (Total guess.)

    Retail price for X7 trigger shifter is $75, and X9 is $125. So I would expect to see around those prices for twisters. (More guessing, but rationalized.)

    You can get the X0 twisters on Ebay for around $200. Just now I saw a 2x10 set for $179. Now, honestly, my question is this... bicycling can be a very costly sport, I understand. But why would you wait 6-12 months to save $100?

    Just get the X0 now if you want or need them. Isn't your usage over the 6-12 months until X9 comes out worth the $75-100 you would save?

  13. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiway View Post
    I'm hoping that SRAM will slightly adjust the older style 9 speed grip shifts and offer them up next year. These new XO and XX versions just seem over engineered and expensive.
    10 speed gripshift will probably trickle down to the lower lines. 10 speed X9, X7, etc should be more like the 9 speed more affordable design, I would think.

  14. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    SRAM is quite good about pushing technology down. However, you aren't going to see new 9 speed. I think you'll see some X9 and maybe X9 3x10 and 2x10 twisters within a year. (Total guess.)

    Retail price for X7 trigger shifter is $75, and X9 is $125. So I would expect to see around those prices for twisters. (More guessing, but rationalized.)

    You can get the X0 twisters on Ebay for around $200. Just now I saw a 2x10 set for $179. Now, honestly, my question is this... bicycling can be a very costly sport, I understand. But why would you wait 6-12 months to save $100?

    Just get the X0 now if you want or need them. Isn't your usage over the 6-12 months until X9 comes out worth the $75-100 you would save?


    woops you beat me to it!

  15. #165
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    It's not about price for me it's just bang for the buck. I like the old design, but want it for 10 speed. The new design seems like overkill to me is all.

    I liked the simplicity of the old design and weight.

  16. #166
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    Can I use 3 speed gripshift with 2 speed crankset? I'm planning to get a new urban bike and use my old 3x8 gripshifts with it, but if I can get a bike with 2x9 and just change the 9 speed cassette to 8 speed cassette, I would have a lot more choises. Now I've been only looking for 3x8 and 3x9 speed bikes.

    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu View Post
    You can still find the 8-speed SRT800 Grip Shift shifters if you look around. I found a new-in-box set on ebay last year. They have a different feel than the SRAM Attack twist shifters. Both work well -- it's just personal preference on feel. When shifting to a smaller cog, the Grip Shifts just click directly to the next gear. The Attacks have some spring resistance first, then snap into the gear.

    I'm using them with old XTR M900 derailleurs and XT 8-speed cassette (11-28t), and they work like a champ.
    Isn't that SRT600 in the picture?

  17. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by empre View Post
    Can I use 3 speed gripshift with 2 speed crankset? I'm planning to get a new urban bike and use my old 3x8 gripshifts with it, but if I can get a bike with 2x9 and just change the 9 speed cassette to 8 speed cassette, I would have a lot more choises. Now I've been only looking for 3x8 and 3x9 speed bikes.


    Isn't that SRT600 in the picture?

    If your front 3x is microfriction than you can use it on any 2x or 3x.
    If its indexed 3x, you can use it on a 2x crank that was converted from a 3x crank. I'm not sure if the new 2x cranks have different spacing, which would mean you couldn't use an old indexed 3x.

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu View Post
    The old 8-speed Grip Shifts from the 90's didn't have the growing resistance before snapping into gear -- the cable moved as the grip moved toward the next detent
    Considering how many people complain about how easy it is to shift accidentally, maybe the spring is to make it harder to shift on accident.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  19. #169
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    I bought a new pair of X9 Grippers from CRC for $30 in 2009 and they work great just like the day I installed them. Can't imagine paying $200 to get the latest and greatest even if they are blingier.

  20. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    Considering how many people complain about how easy it is to shift accidentally, maybe the spring is to make it harder to shift on accident.
    Some models have a very small shifting area, about 1/2 to 2/3 the size of the original twist mechanism.

    On singletrack, covering your brakes with your index finger results in your grip being entirely through the 3 remaining fingers which are on the part of the fixed grip, not the twister.

    Therefore it's impossible to accidentally shift in most situations.

  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    Considering how many people complain about how easy it is to shift accidentally, maybe the spring is to make it harder to shift on accident.
    I've used SRT 600's from mid 90's for 15 years and I've never shifted the gear by accident. I mean not one time. Most of the time I hold the shifter part when I drive and there's no worries it will change if I don't want to. You can't do that with the new shifters. The newer shifters have growing resistance which will make accidental shifting easier.

  22. #172
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    I've put 35-40 hours of riding on my X0 2x10 twist shifters and have a few more things to report.

    The rubber of the grips is not squishy, but it is softer than I thought. It's turned the palms of all my gloves black from rubber and they will wear out entirely faster than any grips I've used in recent memory.

    The inner part of the grip, where you twist the shifter, is wearing much better for pretty obvious reasons. I've got a set of LizardSkins grips ready to go, after scoping them out and realizing I can trim to fit. They aren't lock-on grips, so I will have to use the hardware that comes with the shifters to sort of cap-off the twist mech and let you use a non-sram grip.

    The shifters still work great as would be expected. And I still haven't noticed a problem with the shifter cover rattling, as described in the official MTBR review from a few months ago. Every time I ride a bike with triggers I'm really glad to come back to my twisters.

  23. #173
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    Might a kind soul measure the precise cable pull length of the detents of the front gripshifter? I am planning to hack a gripshifter into a replacement remote for a Fox CTD shock. The space needed between the detents is 7mm x 3 (0mm, 7mm, and 14mm for C, T and D, respectively).

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    Might a kind soul measure the precise cable pull length of the detents of the front gripshifter? I am planning to hack a gripshifter into a replacement remote for a Fox CTD shock. The space needed between the detents is 7mm x 3 (0mm, 7mm, and 14mm for C, T and D, respectively).
    If the gripshift detents are anything other than 7mm, how could you modify it?

  25. #175
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    I think that the detent disk can be hacked. If all fails, I will acquire a 5-speed or 6-speed shifter and use some of the intermediate positions. The CTD shock itself is not indexed, hence that's no biggie.

  26. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    I think that the detent disk can be hacked. If all fails, I will acquire a 5-speed or 6-speed shifter and use some of the intermediate positions. The CTD shock itself is not indexed, hence that's no biggie.
    This page has a chart showing the cable pull for many shifter types: Bicycles/Maintenance and Repair/Gear-changing Dimensions - Wikibooks, open books for an open world

    It looks like there are a few SRAM and Shimano shifter types that pull very close to 3mm. The only SRAM one made for a SRAM RD is 10 speed (3.1mm), which is only available in grip shift at the X0 level, which is a bit pricy (over $100 for the rear). However, keep in mind that SRAM also makes gripshifts for shimano RD's (indicated on the chart as 2:1 as opposed to 1:1). Looks like a 7 speed SRAM shifter made for shimano would be 2.9mm.

    I believe the SRAM MRX 7 speed (which is a gripshift) will be what you are looking for: SRAM MRX Pro Twist Shifter | SRAM

    The rear only can be had for under $15

    Let us know how this works.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  27. #177
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    Might a kind soul measure the precise cable pull length of the detents of the front gripshifter? I am planning to hack a gripshifter into a replacement remote for a Fox CTD shock. The space needed between the detents is 7mm x 3 (0mm, 7mm, and 14mm for C, T and D, respectively).
    A front gripshift will pull 11mm with the first shift and 7mm with the second. This is standard across all front shifters, whether SRAM/Shimano, 9/10 speed.

    You can maybe use an Attack micro-shift front shifter which doesn't have the indexing, just seven or eight clicks across the whole movement.

  28. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by PerthMTB View Post
    A front gripshift will pull 11mm with the first shift and 7mm with the second. This is standard across all front shifters, whether SRAM/Shimano, 9/10 speed.

    You can maybe use an Attack micro-shift front shifter which doesn't have the indexing, just seven or eight clicks across the whole movement.
    Thanks Perth! This is a crucial piece of information. When you say "the first shift is 11mm", do you mean the shift from the largest to the middle chainring (i.e. cable goes from tightest to middle)? If that's the case, then I am out of luck! If however the 11mm jump is from the middle to the smallest chainring (but I doubt that!), then I can use the front shifter with no issues. The shock will not pull the cable for the last 4mm, but that doesn't seem to be a dealbreaker.

  29. #179
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    Sorry, should have made it clearer - the shift from granny to middle takes 11mm of cable, and the shift from middle to big takes 7mm. And remember a front or rear mech has a spring to help take up the slack cable and return the lever. If the shock needs an active pull both ways to move between settings, then using a shifter may not work.

  30. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by PerthMTB View Post
    Sorry, should have made it clearer - the shift from granny to middle takes 11mm of cable, and the shift from middle to big takes 7mm. And remember a front or rear mech has a spring to help take up the slack cable and return the lever. If the shock needs an active pull both ways tpo actuate it then using a shifter may not work.
    Aahh, that's good news. Do you believe that it may work? In my construction the cable will simply be a bit slack in the "D" position. Correct?

  31. #181
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    I think your issue will be that the shifter will 'pull' the lever on the shock ok, but won't 'push' it back the other way. A shifter is designed to pull cable only, the movement in the other direction is due to the spring tension on the mech. By trying to push cable I fear the cable outer will just separate from the shifter body rather than the lever on the shock move.

  32. #182
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    Best grip shift

    Just run a coil spring at the end of the cable on the fork knob, to make a push action. I'm sure you'll figure something out
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
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  33. #183
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    Hey guys. Just picked up a '06 GF sugar 293 which came with trigger shifters and I'm looking to convert to grip shifts. The bike has an X9 rear derailleur (from '06) and a deore front derailleur.

    From what I've read in this thread, I should be able to pick up any set of X7 or X9 grip shifts and they should be compatible. Is that correct?

    Also, would there be any benefit changing my deore front derailleur to an X7 or X9 besides satisfying my OCD?

    Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  34. #184
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    Even though I currently have SRAM XX gripshift - I still love the old, 9-speed X0 - which is way cheaper, lighter and has micro-trim adjustment, something the XX 2x10 no longer does.
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

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  36. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vball_MTNBKR View Post
    Yep. Mine are now on my Cannondale Bad Boy commuter. I have owned them since 2004, and put about 4500 miles on them. Still working great!
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

  37. #187
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    Nice....Thanks Zachariah.

    Do you have any thoughts on whether or not there would be any advantage switching my deore front derailleur to an X7 or X9 if I went with the X0 grip shifts?

    Thanks.

  38. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Even though I currently have SRAM XX gripshift - I still love the old, 9-speed X0 - which is way cheaper, lighter and has micro-trim adjustment, something the XX 2x10 no longer does.

    That's messed up. That trim adjustment is almost essential imho.
    Keep trying to do the awesomest thing you've ever done.

  39. #189
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    ^^ I just put a set of those on my wife's new Juliana build. They shift like buttah.

    I find that the 2x10 does not need FD trim. It can be arduous work to tune it perfectly, but it's entirely possible to setup the 2x10 to use all 20 gears without any chain rub on the front derailleur cage. --Assuming you are using a SRAM 2x10 FD that is.

    It is impossible to do so with the 3x9, that's why it has trim.

  40. #190
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    Also-- I don't know when SRAM came out with them, but they now make the 2x10 / 3x10 Gripshift lock-on grips in 3 sizes: 75mm, 100mm (original/factory size), 125mm.

    I have pretty big hands-- XL glove-- and I didn't really like the 100mm grip but I do love lock-on grips so I did not cut them down or replace them until just last week or so. The 75mm grips are awesome!

    I am not sure who would want the 125mm grip. The only thing I can think of is someone wearing XXL gloves AND who moves their hands to the outside of the twist shifter when not shifting-- presumably so they can yank on the bars without accidental shifts.

    I don't have any trouble with keeping my thumbs against the inner flange of the shifter and yanking on the bars. I would guess others ride like that as well.

  41. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vball_MTNBKR View Post
    Nice....Thanks Zachariah.

    Do you have any thoughts on whether or not there would be any advantage switching my deore front derailleur to an X7 or X9 if I went with the X0 grip shifts?

    Thanks.
    That's entirely up to you. Your Deore FD is the same level as X7. I ran a vintage Shimano XTR FD-M952....and it worked beautifully.
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

  42. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    ^^ I just put a set of those on my wife's new Juliana build. They shift like buttah.

    I find that the 2x10 does not need FD trim. It can be arduous work to tune it perfectly, but it's entirely possible to setup the 2x10 to use all 20 gears without any chain rub on the front derailleur cage. --Assuming you are using a SRAM 2x10 FD that is.

    It is impossible to do so with the 3x9, that's why it has trim.

    On the other hand, there really isn't any good reason to not have the micro adjustment.
    With my 2x9 I enjoy bieng able to slam from small to big by overshooting and then trimming it back. It's a super fast and super solid way to shift the front.

  43. #193
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    Sure there is. If there's no adjustment when it moves it's changing rings-- Period. If you shift fast, you can be sure you're in the right place, no chain rub.

    I'm guessing SRAM's real reason was cost and weight, though.

  44. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    That's entirely up to you. Your Deore FD is the same level as X7. I ran a vintage Shimano XTR FD-M952....and it worked beautifully.
    OK....cool. Thanks.

  45. #195
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    Hi,
    I have an xo gripshift set up as a 1x10 on my bike and I've come into trouble while changing the derailleur cable. To make it simple the coil return spring popped out of place and I cannot figure out how to put it back properly. The difficulty that I'm experiencing takes place when I try to close it up, it just pops back out of place.
    If anyone out there has experienced this and was able to get it back together your help would be greatly appreciated.
    thanks

  46. #196
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    You don't have to disassemble the shifter to change the cable. Shift it to the smallest gear (forward on the right grip, back on the left) and if you have the clamp cover off you can push the cable and the end will come right out.

    Since you've already disassembled it, however, I would seek out SRAM's help via their FB page or a bike shop that sells SRAM who can contact them and fix the shifter.

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