Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: greekzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    34

    Anti-seize for titanium frame. What to use?

    Anti-seize for titanium frames. What to use? The same anti-sieze stuff that you use on aluminum frames?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GearHead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,008
    Permatex recommends the nickel based anti-seize for use on Titanium.
    There is no added value to my participation - in fact, just more confusion.

  3. #3
    Powder King lift jockey.
    Reputation: MknzBikR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    104
    Regular grease works well, the same stuff that you get in the tube for the heavy duty grease guns, its less expensive than the so called 'specialty' lubricants and works just as well if not better, just make sure that you get the thick good quality stuff. Its 100% safe as to use on all metals/plastics as well, unlike some lubes.
    Its also good to use on your chain as long as you dont gob it on .
    Last edited by MknzBikR; 01-21-2006 at 05:59 PM.
    J-bro

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tazdevl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    380
    Quote Originally Posted by MknzBikR
    Regular grease works well, the same stuff that you get in the tube for the heavy duty grease guns, its less expensive than the so called 'specialty' lubricants and works just as well if not better, just make sure that you get the thick good quality stuff. Its 100% safe as to use on all metals/plastics as well, unlike some lubes.
    Its also good to use on your chain as long as you dont gob it on .
    Grease generally doesn't cut it... http://www.stainless-steel-world.net...connecting.asp

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,568
    Quote Originally Posted by greekzilla
    Anti-seize for titanium frames. What to use? The same anti-sieze stuff that you use on aluminum frames?
    Usually people use Finishline Ti-prep, it "looks" like a copper based anti-seize to me.

  6. #6
    need more bikes!
    Reputation: BOhNSAI!!!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    100
    I agree with GearHead that a nickel based anti-sieze should be used. Finishline's is copper based and might be ok for bike use but the industry recommends nickel. I've used both and haven't had problems with either. My suggestion, what ever's cheapest
    "someone set up us the bomb" No puedo sentirme las piernas

    04 Stinky Primo for sale. Please buy it so I can buy more bikes, Please!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,568
    Quote Originally Posted by BOhNSAI!!!
    ... but the industry recommends nickel. I've used both and haven't had problems with either. My suggestion, what ever's cheapest
    Which "industry"? All the Ti bottoms bracket i ever got came with a small sample of Finishline Ti Prep and some ti frame manuals I've seen in the past (5 yrs ago) say to use Ti Prep or copper based in assembly. I agree the nickle based stuff includes titanium in the list of materials its use for but never seen a bike manufacturer recommend it for ti parts.

  8. #8
    Too busy looking good
    Reputation: HOser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    347
    Finish Line Ti-Prep has worked very well for me. I've been using it on the bottom bracket of my Moots Ti frame since I got it three years ago. I remove and check/replace my bottom bracket a few times a year, and the threads are in perfect shape. No galling or seizing at all.

    It comes in a syringe-like tube, and a single tube will last a very long time because a little bit goes a long way - use a little because it's hard to clean up, it's not very soluble, even in degreaser.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GearHead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,008
    I believe what allows people to use either type of anti-seize for bicycles is the lack of high temeperature service. At higher temperatures (like an engine), it would be more important to have the correct type.
    There is no added value to my participation - in fact, just more confusion.

  10. #10
    Boyeeee
    Reputation: BCBlur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    938
    Does the headtube need to be prepped for the headset on a Ti frame, or just the BB and brake tabs?

  11. #11
    need more bikes!
    Reputation: BOhNSAI!!!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    100
    Quote Originally Posted by Ratt
    Which "industry"? All the Ti bottoms bracket i ever got came with a small sample of Finishline Ti Prep and some ti frame manuals I've seen in the past (5 yrs ago) say to use Ti Prep or copper based in assembly. I agree the nickle based stuff includes titanium in the list of materials its use for but never seen a bike manufacturer recommend it for ti parts.
    The industrial industry: auto, aerospace, nuclear, manufacturing. Like I said, I've had no problems with Finish Line's Ti-Prep. I can get the Nickel stuff at work so thats why I use it.

    I agree with Gear Head that it probably has to do with High Temps and High Friction

    I would personally prep the head tube
    "someone set up us the bomb" No puedo sentirme las piernas

    04 Stinky Primo for sale. Please buy it so I can buy more bikes, Please!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    39
    Phil wood grease is great

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: greekzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by BCBlur
    Does the headtube need to be prepped for the headset on a Ti frame, or just the BB and brake tabs?
    Just the BB. I have Permatex that I used with my aluminum frame. I want to make sure I use the correct stuff.

  14. #14
    Carpe Noctem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    311
    The headset/head tube interface is a press fit and should not be greased.
    Off season? What off season?

  15. #15
    need more bikes!
    Reputation: BOhNSAI!!!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    100
    Actually you should. Grease helps in ease of installation. If greasing your cups before installation causes your headset to be loose, then a problem lies in either the headset or the headtube. I've always greased headsets. All the bike mechanics I know grease the headsets. Never had a problem.
    "someone set up us the bomb" No puedo sentirme las piernas

    04 Stinky Primo for sale. Please buy it so I can buy more bikes, Please!

  16. #16
    Carpe Noctem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    311
    I'm a bike mechanic and so is John Barnett, he says don't grease and I say a lot of bike mechanics don't actually have any training. Those same mechanics probably grease square tapered bottom bracket spindles.
    Off season? What off season?

  17. #17
    need more bikes!
    Reputation: BOhNSAI!!!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    100
    I think it is just user preference.

    Race Face recommends greasing, Chris Kings says it's up to the installer, Cane Creek does not say, Neither does WTB or FSA for what I can tell. I think using grease helps prevent damage and galling to the cups and the headtube. Not to say that if done correctly, not using grease causes damage. Also, if you plan on ever replacing the headset, having one that is not corroded stuck helps. This of course will only happen when the headtube and cup are different materials.

    I agree, a lot of bike mechanics don't have a clue what they are doing. However the ones I deal with do.

    I also agree on not greasing the square taper, which also is a good debate
    "someone set up us the bomb" No puedo sentirme las piernas

    04 Stinky Primo for sale. Please buy it so I can buy more bikes, Please!

  18. #18
    Carpe Noctem
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    311
    Fair enough, you bring up some good points too.
    Off season? What off season?

  19. #19
    *Hotter than Hell*
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    719
    Litespeed recommends copper based anti-seize.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ExtraStout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    123
    Quote Originally Posted by greekzilla
    Anti-seize for titanium frames. What to use? The same anti-sieze stuff that you use on aluminum frames?
    Titus uses the copper based anti-seize on the lower Ti pivot bearings, and reccomends marine grease for the Ti fastners. Ti prep [copper based anti-seize] is also ok by them for the fasteners.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •