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  1. #1
    offroader
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    Advice on how to prevent overshifting - chain drop

    It's happened to me several times where I'm about to hit a steep incline I rapidly change my gears all the way up. Then it happens, the chain over shoots the last gear and gets wedged between my cassette and my spokes and it's a ***** to get out, not to mention bending and scratching the spokes on my expensive set of wheels. I've tried to reduce the limit on my rear derailleur to hopefully prevent this from happening in the future. Is there anything else I get do short of using a spoke protector?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    You're lucky that that's the worst that happened. All too often a misadjusted inner (low gear) limit screw results in the RD snagging in the spokes and an expensive repair.

    The limit should be brought in until you cannot shift to the largest cog at all, and then carefully backed off in small adjustments until you can make the shift, and no more.

    If the limit is properly set you can do without the soup dish on the wheel, but if you're concerned it isn't an expensive or heavy bit of added protection. If you do mount a spoke protector, remember that it offers limited protection. Your real protection is a correctly adjusted inner limit screw.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  3. #3
    offroader
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    Thanks, I tuned up the rear derailleur setting the limit just enough to let it shift to the last gear. Hopefully this will prevent future problems.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    That'll solve the problem, but remember to re-check the limit after every crash, especially if you suddenly find that the trim has changed and you adjust cable tension.

    Usually, sudden trim/cable tension changes are the result of the hanger getting bent and moving the entire system inboard a bit.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  5. #5
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
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    good advice....even though I already knew this...and then forgot. I did the same thing last night, luckily I was riding around the neighborhood after working on the bike. I had to carry it home and remove the cassette to free the chain. I've gotten lazy by just adjusting the limit screw to where it looks and sounds right, not the method you describe which is frankly, better for your bike.

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