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Thread: 1x10 2x10 3x10

  1. #1
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    1x10 2x10 3x10

    Forgive the noob bit, but I am getting back into the technologies of MTBs after about 15 years and I could not find a good pro/con for the subject.

    Besides weight reduction, what is the benefit for 1x10, 2x10 or 3x10?

    Is it just a rider preference? Task at hand ie climbing, speed, mix?

    Do you actually reduce redundancy in gears by going to a 2x10 from a 3x10?

    Thoughts?

    Cheers.

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    1x10 + simplicity due to no FD/shifter. Expect to walk the steeps and spin out a bit the downs

    2x10 = race type setup, not the full top or low end of a 3x but close. For strong riders, but a 2x10 by dropping the large ring of a 3x is good for hilly areas

    3x10 = overkill usually unless you live in hilly areas, especially with the Shimano Dynasys version where there are more overlapping gears now.
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  3. #3
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRandall
    1x10 + simplicity due to no FD/shifter. Expect to walk the steeps and spin out a bit the downs

    2x10 = race type setup, not the full top or low end of a 3x but close. For strong riders, but a 2x10 by dropping the large ring of a 3x is good for hilly areas

    3x10 = overkill usually unless you live in hilly areas, especially with the Shimano Dynasys version where there are more overlapping gears now.
    2X. Great summary.

    Personal observation: I have a 1 x 9 hardtail and a 3 x 9 dual suspension. The 3 x 9 has 3 lower gears than the 1 x 9 (32T crank) and therefore is used when hills are long, steep or both. There are lots of them around where I live.

    But riding the 1 x 9 also showed me how little I ever used the 44T big ring on the triple. So I swapped the 44T for a bash, and now run bash - 32 - 22 instead of a triple, as AlexRandall mentioned above.

    That is a great compromise for gearing and something I recommend you check out
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRandall
    1x10 + simplicity due to no FD/shifter. Expect to walk the steeps and spin out a bit the downs

    2x10 = race type setup, not the full top or low end of a 3x but close. For strong riders, but a 2x10 by dropping the large ring of a 3x is good for hilly areas

    3x10 = overkill usually unless you live in hilly areas, especially with the Shimano Dynasys version where there are more overlapping gears now.
    Good summary on the 2x and 3x. Don't completely agree on the 1x10 summary though. It completely depends on where you live and what chainring size you use. Where I live I can ride a 36t chainring up front, and never spin out, and have only had to walk once and everyone was walking. Raced this setup all over Texas, a race in LA, and nationals up in Colorado.
    But like I said depends on what size chainring you can push, if you live in the mountains or not, etc.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRandall
    1x10 + simplicity due to no FD/shifter. Expect to walk the steeps and spin out a bit the downs

    2x10 = race type setup, not the full top or low end of a 3x but close. For strong riders, but a 2x10 by dropping the large ring of a 3x is good for hilly areas

    3x10 = overkill usually unless you live in hilly areas, especially with the Shimano Dynasys version where there are more overlapping gears now.
    2xwhatever can also just be a 3x crank with the big ring removed. Increases ground clearance and you only lose the 2 highest ratios. Great for most trail riding.
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