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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm 11-40T/42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth vs. Hope

    Now we have two similar products to create a cheap 1x conversion with 11-42T cassette for sram and shimano. Full shimano 11-42 drivetrain, dream comes true!

    OneUp Components 40T/42T Sprocket
    Wolf Tooth Components 42T Giant Cog

    There is also the general lee cassette, which replaces 4 cogs and cost twice, let's leave it out now due to cost.

    What it looks to me so far comparing the two, the wolf tooth has many advantages:

    1. No spacer, dedicated models for SRAM and Shimano. Should create wider cog-freehub interface. Less freehub wear, better.
    2. Comes with extra long B tension screw in case your derailleur does not have enough clearance from the 42T cog on the original screw.
    3. Known reputation and highly regarded.
    4. Looks like more teeth shaping, should aid shifting.
    5. Price for 42T + 16T: Wolf Tooth is $90+$15=$105, Oneup is $90.

    That's what I can tell from the web pages. Looks like Wolf Tooth is a better choice at higher price.

    From reports Shimano derailleurs have more problems dealing with 42T cogs than sram. 40T may be a better option for shimano users.

    OneUp Rad Cage seems to be the ticket for shimano users and greatly improves shifting performance.

    Did you install it and how is it working?

    Post your setup for others to know
    • Frame model and year
    • Derailleur model and cage size
    • Cassette & chain
    • How it works


    Updates:

    SunRace CSMX3 10sp cassette, 11-40 and 11-42
    • $60
    • Complete cassette with good teeth ratios
    • Steel cogs on aluminum spider, big cog is aluminum
    • Less hacky than piecemeal cassette extensions
    • 383g for 11-40
    • All steel cogs versions coming soon, will weight 414g and 448g
    • User reports it shifts fine


    Hope 40 T-Rex Adapter
    • $90
    • Sram and Shimano specific cogs with no spacers
    • 4 shifting gates (OneUp and WT have 6 gates)
    • Hope reputation and diehard fan club
    • No 16T cog


    E13 Extended Range 40/42T Cog
    • $70 (on Jenson), $60 on outsideoutfitters
    • Sram and Shimano specific cogs with no spacers
    • Sram only 42T, Shimano 40/42T
    • 6 shifting gates
    • E13 reputation
    • No 16T cog


    twenty6 40/42T Cog
    • $95
    • Sram and Shimano specific cogs with no spacers
    • 5 shifting gates for 40T. 42T I assume its 6.
    • 10 colors
    • No 16T cog


    Absolute Black 40T Cassette Cog
    • $74
    • Shimano 40T only
    • No 16T cog
    Last edited by CrozCountry; 09-29-2015 at 10:48 PM. Reason: Updates

  2. #2
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    wolftooth is domestically manufactured, and they're great people.

    oneup appears to be a canadian co (with offshore manufacturing), but the who's and where's are all shrouded in secrecy for some reason; bit of a faceless company.

    both seem to be solid products, but i gave my $ to wolftooth based on above.

  3. #3
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    Went with Wolftooth. US company with US manufacturing and still a better price. I guess unless you need the versatility (Shimano/SRAM) or green ano...there isn't much reason to go with 1up unless they undercut WT. Even then if the price is close for equal or better product I'm buying US over overseas.

    No review since I don't have it yet.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    What it looks to me so far comparing the two, the wolf tooth has many advantages:

    1. No spacer, dedicated models for SRAM and Shimano. Should create wider cog-freehub interface. Less freehub wear, better.
    2. $90 vs $100, $10 cheaper.
    3. Comes with extra long B tension screw in case your derailleur does not have enough clearance from the 42T cog on the original screw.
    4. Known reputation and highly regarded.
    5. Looks like more teeth shaping, should aid shifting.
    These are my exact thoughts. I'm waiting for the Sram versions to become available and more reviews to pop up before making any decisions, though.

  5. #5
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    I like how WT is making the shift ramps to match the cassettes, not just a one fits all. Mine is in the mail as we speak.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I like how WT is making the shift ramps to match the cassettes, not just a one fits all. Mine is in the mail as we speak.
    Placed a pre-order as well.
    I'm always looking for new people to ride with. If you are on the Front Range, shoot me a PM and let's go ridin'.

  7. #7
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    OneUp is from so cal...at least thats where my cog shipped from.

    The cassette specific cog seems like marketing to me. WT's way to one up OneUp. There has been many reviews on the OU 42t and nobody has mentioned poor shifting.

    I can see WT making different cogs because of the different spacing with Shimano and SRAM cassettes so you don't have to use shims like with the OU. Unless there is some kind of comparison where is shows a discernable difference between the Shimano and SRAM specific cogs...its all marketing.

  8. #8
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    Re: 11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    What about absolute black? They have a 40t coming, that would be my choice, because of the size.

    I have a WT 32t front ring and it seems like very good quality so if they made a 40t I would buy that.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    OneUp is from so cal...at least thats where my cog shipped from.

    The cassette specific cog seems like marketing to me. WT's way to one up OneUp. There has been many reviews on the OU 42t and nobody has mentioned poor shifting.

    I can see WT making different cogs because of the different spacing with Shimano and SRAM cassettes so you don't have to use shims like with the OU. Unless there is some kind of comparison where is shows a discernable difference between the Shimano and SRAM specific cogs...its all marketing.
    Marketing or not, more competition means better and cheaper products for us consumers.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strafer.2 View Post
    Marketing or not, more competition means better and cheaper products for us consumers.
    +1 on this. Wondering when Shimano or Sram will make a 42T or 40T 10sp. cassette, if ever?
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    +1 on this. Wondering when Shimano or Sram will make a 42T or 40T 10sp. cassette, if ever?
    Why not do a 44-11 10 speed or something like that so you still keep the range and don't need a special freehub or der. Wouldn't it be just like a xx1 but missing one gear in the middle somewhere?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    OneUp is from so cal...at least thats where my cog shipped from.

    The cassette specific cog seems like marketing to me. WT's way to one up OneUp. There has been many reviews on the OU 42t and nobody has mentioned poor shifting.

    I can see WT making different cogs because of the different spacing with Shimano and SRAM cassettes so you don't have to use shims like with the OU. Unless there is some kind of comparison where is shows a discernable difference between the Shimano and SRAM specific cogs...its all marketing.
    You made a good purchase, you don't need to help justify it by putting down another product or company. I have been guilty of this a time or two.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    Now we have two similar products to create a cheap 1x conversion with 11-42T cassette for sram and shimano. Full shimano 11-42 drivetrain, dream comes true!

    OneUp Components 42T Sprocket
    Wolf Tooth Components 42T Giant Cog

    There is also the general lee cassette, which replaces 4 cogs and cost twice, let's leave it out now due to cost.

    What it looks to me so far comparing the two, the wolf tooth has many advantages:

    1. No spacer, dedicated models for SRAM and Shimano. Should create wider cog-freehub interface. Less freehub wear, better.
    2. $90 vs $100, $10 cheaper.
    3. Comes with extra long B tension screw in case your derailleur does not have enough clearance from the 42T cog on the original screw.
    4. Known reputation and highly regarded.
    5. Looks like more teeth shaping, should aid shifting.

    That's what I can tell from the web pages. Looks like Wolf Tooth is a better choice.

    Anyone tried both? Or maybe the hot and new WTC Giant Cog? (OneUp has many reviews already)
    I can not compare Oneup to WT, as I have a German made 42T. I will say this though, the Wolf Tooth front chainrings are great products. I like them better than the Sram xx1. They run so smooth and quiet. Because of this, when I replace my 42t I will get a Wolf Tooth. They also have really good CS.

  14. #14
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    People get way to sensitive about things.

    This is a "vs" thread and I'm just giving my opinion.

    If WT can show that there is an improvement in shifting by having a manufacturer specific cog...I'll buy one. I do have more than one mountain bike.

    Since these 42t cogs are the hot item for the moment...manufacturers are thinking marketing and one upping. How can I market my product that does the same thing, is manufactured with the same equipment out of similar materials to be different?

  15. #15
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    11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    I've got an SLX cassette for a while, while I wait for my XT to show up.

    Gonna swap out the 13t cog. Not 100% sure the cassette will go back together properly... Fingers crossed.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Why not do a 44-11 10 speed or something like that so you still keep the range and don't need a special freehub or der. Wouldn't it be just like a xx1 but missing one gear in the middle somewhere?
    I think they would need a special derailleur for that huge gap. Shimano puts a well designed complete package, I find it hard to imagine they would just throw a cassette out there without a fully working kit. for example, even current derailleurs need an extra long B tension screw and thats with 42, imagine with 44. They would probably reengineer the geometry of the derailleur to be closer to the small cog, or use tricky cage like sram. And there is a the question of whether freehubs can handle the torque. Like OneUp says in their blog, too small front ring and heavy riders put enough torque for premature failure of hubs. There is definitely more work to do than just a cassette, but I also think its just a matter of time until shimano puts out a 1x. If I have to guess it will be 1x10 and work with existing cassettes. I can be totally wrong on this guess, don't place bets.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Why not do a 44-11 10 speed or something like that so you still keep the range and don't need a special freehub or der. Wouldn't it be just like a xx1 but missing one gear in the middle somewhere?
    As CozXountry has said there is the issue of the derailleur, but also there is little difference between a 42 and a 44 when you start from a 11x36 cassette. Look at the ratios for a 32 chainring

    Cog: 26, 28, 30, 32, 36, 40, 42, 44
    Ratio: 1.230 1.140 1.070 1.000 0.889 0.800 0.762 0.727

    fhe jump 36 to 42 gets you an almost perfect interval ratio decrement (compare 32 to 36), 44 gains around a 1/3 of an extra gear, 40, like AbsoluteBlack is doing, is also not that great giving a ratio that is less decremental than the gap 32 cog to 36.

    A 10 cog also gains relatively little, look at the ratios 10, 11, 13

    3.200 2.910 2.460

    the decrement between 11 and 13 is good, 11 to 10 is kind of silly because it only gets you a 1/2 of an extra gear (at a cost of more than $1000).

    11x42 is huge for most uses, but for a racer or even more spread the way to go is 9x42, like Leonardi Factory is going to offer Leonardi Racing 9x42 Cassette 10 speed, 9 really gives you an overdrive gear ratio: 3.560

  18. #18
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    I installed the 41 Ebay cassette. The der. is completely stressed and I would find it hard to believe that the der would have any longevity.
    The B tension screw bends really easy because they hit the stop at an angle . Wasn't comfortable with the setup, back to 2x
    One of the companies provides a longer B screw. It would be smart to use a tougher material than mild steel

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    +1 on this. Wondering when Shimano or Sram will make a 42T or 40T 10sp. cassette, if ever?
    +2 (or a 1000) I would think though the only hope would be from Shimano, not SRAM. SRAM's all in with their 1x11 model, and from a company ($) perspective, there is little to no reason to make 42T cassette, as it gives your customers less incentive to upgrade everything and get to 1x11.

    I've said it elsewhere... I'd buy more than a few Shimano 10 speed cassettes with a 42t option. Heck, done right, it'd be a great marketing device to appeal to tied-in-the-wool SRAM folks who can't afford the jump to XX1 or XO1.

  20. #20
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    I've ordered the Wolftooth, their stellar narrow/wide rings plus the fact the GC is Shimano specific (no spacer required) and comes with the B tension screw shows they know what they are doing.

  21. #21
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    11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    Same.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    Since these 42t cogs are the hot item for the moment...manufacturers are thinking marketing and one upping. How can I market my product that does the same thing, is manufactured with the same equipment out of similar materials to be different?
    yeah, not much to differentiate the products, and, i'm assuming, there will be a relatively short window of opportunity to sell these things before we see some ~affordable production wide range cassettes by the major players. i can't imagine shimano won't be stepping up sooner than later (granted, it IS shimano, and while they make some really great stuff, they do have their epic head shaking moments).

    anyways; cool to see all the crafty little guys filling the void. chain guide & front derailleur free full range drivetrain upgrades for ~$150? brilliant.

  23. #23
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    I have had an eBay 41t cassette for over a year with a X9 derailleur with no problems at all. I am running a 2X10 with a 40,27 with a 41t on the rear, I took off the 13t.
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  24. #24
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    The ebay 41T is another similar product that is probably a direct comparison. From looking at it:

    • Significantly less machining
    • 3 times heavier
    • No shifting ramps
    • 41T is less than ideal for downshifting from the next 36T cog (36/42T make perfect 6 gates)
    • Narrower interface with the cassette
    • Nicely cut freehub teeth

    But it costs less than half. Fair trade-off.

  25. #25
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    Attachment 867239

    Got mine today! Mounted up with no issues, super nice they included a longer B screw. Quality is the normal from Wolf Tooth, meaning HIGH. Looks really nice and is well finished. Details on the teeth look great. Has the feel of something that will outlast a few cassettes.

    I've got a 34T chainring and XT med cage and needed to add 2 links of chain. Shifts up and down pretty much like stock. No hesitation, skipping, or added noise.

    Not sure how to get the pic rotated, but you get the idea

  26. #26
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    Wink More real world reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by jselwyn View Post
    Attachment 867239

    Got mine today! Mounted up with no issues, super nice they included a longer B screw. Quality is the normal from Wolf Tooth, meaning HIGH. Looks really nice and is well finished. Details on the teeth look great. Has the feel of something that will outlast a few cassettes.

    I've got a 34T chainring and XT med cage and needed to add 2 links of chain. Shifts up and down pretty much like stock. No hesitation, skipping, or added noise.

    Not sure how to get the pic rotated, but you get the idea
    I really appreciate all the discussion about ratios and theoretical shifting but if anyone is using these massive rear cogs to convert to 1 x 10 please give your real world experience, review and set-up details. Does it suck or is it great and why? Thanks for including your set-up and picture. More like this please.

  27. #27
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    Re: 11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    My Wolf Tooth GC will be here Thursday. Going to mod an SLX cassette to fit and will try to report on my experience with this paired to Race Face NW 30T over the weekend.

    I already plan to space the 30T inward a couple mm as the chainline currently looks much better in high gears rather than the 36t ring on there now. Hopefully that will help increase the life of both the 30t up front and the 42t in back as I spend a lot of my riding time granny gearing to the top in order to ride down (typical WNC/Pisgah riding).

  28. #28
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    I'm still on the fence about the whole setup. I installed my Wolftooth yesterday and even though I haven't ridden it yet I'm not real impressed with it. Not the design of the cog that is beautiful and the shifting is fine but the tension on the der. is just crazy. Also i'm concerned about the lack of chain wrap I'm getting on the smaller cogs. I don't know maybe I'm being over cautious but just seems like not a great idea.

  29. #29
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    Anyone got an online source for ordering extra long b-screws? Sram and Shimano?

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I'm still on the fence about the whole setup. I installed my Wolftooth yesterday and even though I haven't ridden it yet I'm not real impressed with it. Not the design of the cog that is beautiful and the shifting is fine but the tension on the der. is just crazy. Also i'm concerned about the lack of chain wrap I'm getting on the smaller cogs. I don't know maybe I'm being over cautious but just seems like not a great idea.
    My thoughts and fears exactly, can anyone else comment?

  31. #31
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    got a 34T wolf red ring up front (killer!) and the wolf 42T rear cog, tried all combos with the different rings in back and the best was pulling out the 17T

    the 11-13-15-19-21-24-28-32-36-42 worked the best from what I tried, with an XT cassette the 19 is attached you can not remove so going from 15 to the 19 was not an issue at all. Cant wait to get it on the trail! pictures to come!

  32. #32
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    What rear derailleur are you using please?

  33. #33
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    oh sorry guys. XTR shadow plus, Liteville 301

  34. #34
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    My xt med cage didn't work that great so I threw on a xtr shadow plus long and it's better, still don't like it and thinking about ordering x01. A longer chain might have helped the xt but there was room yet.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    Anyone got an online source for ordering extra long b-screws? Sram and Shimano?
    Your local hardware store. A nice stainless bolt will run you about 75 cents.
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  36. #36
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    I have the med with 120 link chain, works perfect

  37. #37
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    It rides ok.

  38. #38
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    Hi All,
    Thanks for the comments and feedback.* The only thing I can really add (because each customer will in the end have to make their own decision) is that the timing of the shifting ramps is extremely critical and SRAM and Shimano are much different.

    While the "perfect shift" (you know, the one you don't even hear or feel) will always only happen with some level of probability, the timing of the shift ramps can change this from a very low percentage to a very high percentage.* There is a lot of interesting science in shifting and we sure had fun optimizing the GC!!

    Cheers,
    Wolf Tooth Brendan
    wolftoothcomponents.com

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    Anyone got an online source for ordering extra long b-screws? Sram and Shimano?
    Got mine here: TorontoCycles, Titanium Bolts, Alloy Bolts,Titanium Fasteners, A2z

    I picked up a M4x25mm Ti screw along with some other Ti bits.

    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I'm still on the fence about the whole setup. I installed my Wolftooth yesterday and even though I haven't ridden it yet I'm not real impressed with it. Not the design of the cog that is beautiful and the shifting is fine but the tension on the der. is just crazy. Also i'm concerned about the lack of chain wrap I'm getting on the smaller cogs. I don't know maybe I'm being over cautious but just seems like not a great idea.
    The shifting does suffer in the three smaller cogs. The performance is diminished to an extent.

    Here is what I got from riding my OneUp,

    My setup is: SLX shifter, XT Shadow Plus RD, SRAM 1030 11-36 cassette, Raceface 30T NW chainring, SLX crank, 73mm BB with a spacer on the drive side.

    -The shifting in the 11, 13, 15 isn't that great. Its not as smooth with the b-tension cranked so far in. Shifting above the 17 is fine. Shift from the 36 to 42 is smooth.
    -On occasion shifting from the 19 to the 15...the chain will miss the 15 and drop onto the 13...then pop back up. (maybe my adjustment is off)
    -I'm shifting the rear alot more than with the double.
    -There is a noticeable cadence jump (for me) from the 15 to 19. On flats, it feels like my cadence is too high in the 19 or too low in the 15. I guess its something you can get used to.
    -if your looking for pure performance or racing where you're really shifting alot in the smaller cogs...you may want to stick with your double or run XX/X01

    For me...its fine...something new to try out. The slow shifting in the smaller cogs are fine for me. Its worth it to get rid of the front derailleur.


  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfTooth View Post
    Hi All,
    Thanks for the comments and feedback.* The only thing I can really add (because each customer will in the end have to make their own decision) is that the timing of the shifting ramps is extremely critical and SRAM and Shimano are much different.

    While the "perfect shift" (you know, the one you don't even hear or feel) will always only happen with some level of probability, the timing of the shift ramps can change this from a very low percentage to a very high percentage.* There is a lot of interesting science in shifting and we sure had fun optimizing the GC!!

    Cheers,
    Wolf Tooth Brendan
    hi thanks for posting up. So can you give it to us straight what this will do with the rear derailleur

  41. #41
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    oops...
    Last edited by RS VR6; 02-04-2014 at 03:23 PM. Reason: double post

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    Re: 11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    hi thanks for posting up. So can you give it to us straight what this will do with the rear derailleur
    I doubt anyone knows what it will do long term... It's more tension.. So it will either expedite the spring failing or do nothing. Are there really other options?

  43. #43
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    @Yody - We have not seen and do not expect an impact to rear derailleur life. Tightening the b-screw does change the geometry of the shift but the cage spring itself should not be stressed significantly more than with a 36t (noting that you have to add a few links when installing the GC).
    wolftoothcomponents.com

  44. #44
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    On mine the longer b-screw started to eat away at the stop and was starting to bypass it. It is officially binned.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    On mine the longer b-screw started to eat away at the stop and was starting to bypass it. It is officially binned.
    Ruh Roh

  46. #46
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    that blows. looks like i might have saved me some $

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishwrinkle View Post
    that blows. looks like i might have saved me some $
    Remember this is just some idiot on the interwweb, your results might be fine. Maybe a different der, or turn the screw around backwards so there is more contact area? I'm sure they did their homework and it works, just not for me.

  48. #48
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    Looks like we need new derailleur hangers
    Or maybe a new axle bracket for the derailleur, there are less derailleurs than frames

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Remember this is just some idiot on the interwweb, your results might be fine. Maybe a different der, or turn the screw around backwards so there is more contact area? I'm sure they did their homework and it works, just not for me.
    Dude, aren't you the "idiot" who just posted that?

  50. #50
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    Perfect colour match with the Raceface wide/narrow and the Oneup 42t green. This is going on my Krampus I had 2 x 10 on it moving to 1 x 10. My Oneup shipped from Delta BC.
    BBB (big beautiful bike)

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    Dude, aren't you the "idiot" who just posted that?
    Yup and it's a good rule to live by, do you really know the person that is giving the advice and how do you know said person is not just some idiot who messed it up? Just saying wait for more reviews, I don't want to be the one to crush everyone's dreams.

    For sale one black Wolftooth Giant Cog hardly used.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Yup and it's a good rule to live by, do you really know the person that is giving the advice and how do you know said person is not just some idiot who messed it up? Just saying wait for more reviews, I don't want to be the one to crush everyone's dreams.

    For sale one black Wolftooth Giant Cog hardly used.
    PM me a price, I'll take it

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfTooth View Post
    @Yody - We have not seen and do not expect an impact to rear derailleur life. Tightening the b-screw does change the geometry of the shift but the cage spring itself should not be stressed significantly more than with a 36t (noting that you have to add a few links when installing the GC).
    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    On mine the longer b-screw started to eat away at the stop and was starting to bypass it. It is officially binned.
    WolfTooth, any ideas?

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    Looks like we need new derailleur hangers
    Or maybe a new axle bracket for the derailleur, there are less derailleurs than frames
    There's only 400,000,000 types of deraileur hangers out there.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  55. #55
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    We feel it is necessary to chime in on a few details.

    It has been noted in this forum that OneUp chose to offer one universally mounted ring. While it would have been easier for us to design 2 separate sprockets, we worked hard to optimize a design that would work equally well for both Sram and Shimano. It took over 6 months of development time to perfect our dual shift features and clocking. We feel the OneUp design gives riders the greatest flexibility to mix and match drivetrains on future builds without having to replace the 42T. Check out reviews from MTBR's Brian Mullin, Bikerumor, Pinkbike and many others.

    Regarding B-screw. Whether you choose our ring or a competitor’s, some derailleurs (typically Shimano) require more b-screw than is available in the stock setup. We recommend approaching this in two stages. First remove the b-screw washer and reinstall the screw – This should be enough for most setups. If additional tension is still needed we recommend reversing the b-screw and using the removed washer in its original position. We strongly recommend against installing a longer b-screw. If that length of screw is required it is far better to have the additional area of the screw head to avoid damage to the screw or stop. In addition, if the derailleur is hit in such a way as to bend the b-screw, removal of an unreversed screw will cause damage to your RD.

    We hope this helps

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneUp View Post

    Regarding B-screw. Whether you choose our ring or a competitor’s, some derailleurs (typically Shimano) require more b-screw than is available in the stock setup. We recommend approaching this in two stages. First remove the b-screw washer and reinstall the screw – This should be enough for most setups. If additional tension is still needed we recommend reversing the b-screw and using the removed washer in its original position. We strongly recommend against installing a longer b-screw. If that length of screw is required it is far better to have the additional area of the screw head to avoid damage to the screw or stop. In addition, if the derailleur is hit in such a way as to bend the b-screw, removal of an unreversed screw will cause damage to your RD.

    We hope this helps
    Solid advise!!

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneUp View Post
    We feel it is necessary to chime in on a few details.

    It has been noted in this forum that OneUp chose to offer one universally mounted ring. While it would have been easier for us to design 2 separate sprockets, we worked hard to optimize a design that would work equally well for both Sram and Shimano. It took over 6 months of development time to perfect our dual shift features and clocking. We feel the OneUp design gives riders the greatest flexibility to mix and match drivetrains on future builds without having to replace the 42T. Check out reviews from MTBR's Brian Mullin, Bikerumor, Pinkbike and many others.

    Regarding B-screw. Whether you choose our ring or a competitor’s, some derailleurs (typically Shimano) require more b-screw than is available in the stock setup. We recommend approaching this in two stages. First remove the b-screw washer and reinstall the screw – This should be enough for most setups. If additional tension is still needed we recommend reversing the b-screw and using the removed washer in its original position. We strongly recommend against installing a longer b-screw. If that length of screw is required it is far better to have the additional area of the screw head to avoid damage to the screw or stop. In addition, if the derailleur is hit in such a way as to bend the b-screw, removal of an unreversed screw will cause damage to your RD.

    We hope this helps
    Awesome info, thank you for participating!

    Can you make any comments on the lack of chain wrap on the lower cogs and how that will affect chain life? Thats the other thing I'm concerned about

  58. #58
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    Hey Yody,
    We have been working with bdundee to figure out the problem on his setup, but haven't yet. All I can tell you is that we haven't seen this in any of our testing (all around the US on lots of different bike setups). I am also not aware of any problems with the 1 up either and it requires the same b-screw setting as ours. There are more of those in the field right now with lots of reviews too.
    wolftoothcomponents.com

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfTooth View Post
    Hey Yody,
    We have been working with bdundee to figure out the problem on his setup, but haven't yet. All I can tell you is that we haven't seen this in any of our testing (all around the US on lots of different bike setups). I am also not aware of any problems with the 1 up either and it requires the same b-screw setting as ours. There are more of those in the field right now with lots of reviews too.
    Just drop shipped mine to Yody!! I'm sure my problem was just a freak thing.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    Can you make any comments on the lack of chain wrap on the lower cogs and how that will affect chain life? Thats the other thing I'm concerned about
    Hey Yody - I'll do my best. I would be lying if I told you we had extensive studies on chain wear across systems.

    When the b-screw is setup for a standard 11-36 it drives the 11T by 5 or 6 teeth (on my particular setup ~75% on 5 and 25% on 6). When you set it up for a 42T the RD rotates back so you do lose some wrap. On my setup, this causes it to drive on 5 teeth all the time (the 5th tooth disengages at the same time as a new tooth engages). So as you pointed out the chain wrap will be less and there will be some theoretical increase in wear to the lower cogs and therefore the chain.

    That said, I believe this increase would be marginal. The high output time spent in the 11T and 13T, for me at least, is low. This marginal decrease in the number of load carrying teeth is also offset by the ability to run a larger front chainring (lower chain tension for a given pedal input force).

    I hope this is helpful.

  61. #61
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    The wear factor doesn't bother me but the lack of chain wrap or it could be the change in derailleur angle seemed to make shifting a lot less crisp, but I'm a little finicky and it might not bother a normal cat.

    Just as a note the 36-42 shifted great just the others left wanting.

  62. #62
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    Took a couple pics of the stop on the b-tension screw

    On my Pivot in a "normal" position.


    On my Spesh with the 42T. The end of the screw is halfway off the stop.

  63. #63
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    i can see why bdundee says his got boogered up.

  64. #64
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    Got my OneUp fitted early last week. Setup and tuning was very simple. Had plenty of screw on my Sram XX Mech. Only done 3 rides, and since all chain contact points are new, its all still bedding in, but im finding that all shifts are good ( not in the same league as they were with my previous XX cassette mind you).


    OneUp 42t Green - XT 11-36 cassette - Raceface Narrow Wide 32t Green - KMC X10 SL Gold 10 Speed - KCNC Ultra Jockeys 11t Gold - XX rear Mech.
    Attachment 867602

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    Yeah a drop derailleur hanger is a great idea! And yes Shimano will come out with a 40 tooth 10 speed cassette.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    There's only 400,000,000 types of deraileur hangers out there.
    Derailleurs you have
    SLX/XT/XTR, X7/X9/XO/XX, you can get more derailleur hangers just from one brand

    Having said that, I think a derailleur hanger is a better solution.
    Or wait for shimano to come out with a full working kit, which is hopefully not that far in the future and will be a simple upgrade. Unlike sram, shimano trickle down of technology is quick, I would not be surprised if we see XT and SLX right from the start (especially when they play catch-up). And then sram will immediately have to respond with X7/X9. One can dream

  67. #67
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    I find the whole discussion about gearing to be fascinating, but let's be honest folks, it's not rocket science.

    The 3x drivetrain was the result of decades of refinement of gear ratios. It's pretty simple to figure out your gear ratios with a simple spreadsheet to see how much range is lost when you take away one or two chainrings. The weight difference is trivial, because the chainrings being removed are about the same weight as the sprockets being added.

    But humans are always suckers for something new, just for the sake of being new, and yes, it does seem to solve the issue of dropped chains, but this can also be addressed by simply letting up on the cranks while shifting, in addition to minimizing chain drops by setting up your chain length, b-tension and front derailleur correctly.

    We had 12-36 six-speed freewheels and cassettes with big ol' 46 tooth rings in front (and 48 or 50+ tooth rings for XC) back in the day before seven, then eight, then nine, and now ten and eleven speed drivetrains. Have I seen a lot of improvement in the way bikes shift, going from the original 6-speed indexed Deore XT to every Shimano/Suntour/SRAM combination of gears the bike industry has offered? Not really. Did smaller chainrings up front bring the weight down a lot? Not really, but the whole microdrive (i.e. sub 12-tooth and proportionally smaller chainring) fad sure did cause drivetrains to wear out quicker (fewer teeth equals more wear per tooth).

    SRAM and Shimano are trying to sell product. MTBR is trying to drive traffic. Bike magazines are trying to increase readership. It is all a big circle jerk. Shimano could make a seven, eight or nine speed 11-40 cassettes that worked with existing components and they would sell like crazy, but it would cannibalize their drivetrain sales. Why sell a cassette when they can persuade you to buy new shifters, derailleurs and cranks to go with it? And a new freehub body too.

    This is, for the greater part, marketing hype and offers little that cannot be found in a properly-tuned 3x6 drivetrain, circa 1987. I do not deny there is a small amount of engineering refinement going on here, but the key word is small. The bigger part is marketing.

    This whole trend of abolishing front chainrings is our day's Biopace. Engineering and logic may prevail, but marketing is a force to be reckoned with. Do yourself a favor and study up on gear ratios so you know what you are giving up before you dump those front chainrings.

  68. #68
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    I don't know about that. Lots of people were going 1X before sram came up with official 1X. I look at 1X as a market pull from consumers, and not as a push from the big brands. They responded to demand. 2X, same thing. People replaced the 3X big ring with a bash in masses well before the big brands came up with official 2X drivetrains. Personally I never bought an official 2X drivetrain because the 3X + bash worked equally as well. I think its cool that companies monitor the market and come up with out-of-the-box solutions to what people are already home brewing.
    But you can be sure that when they come up with something new they will push it hard, its a business after all.

    One of the best things in my new build is 1x10 with standard 11-36 cog. I was also running 1x with a guide on my DJ for years (which also moonlights as a backup mountain bike, so it needs gears). It beats any 2x or 3x if you can live with the range. I cannot see myself ever again doing a bike build with a front derailleur. Modern bikes are already complicated, KISS

    Thats just my view, but I think I am not the only one that likes to remove stuff from the bike. On the trail, less is more.

  69. #69
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    I'm running a 34t front ring and a 11-38 rear. I've fitted the 38T sprocket from mtbtools on ebay. Works a treat, I figured its only 4 teeth bigger than my 11-34 cassette so would give me less compatabilty issues. It's not as slick looking as one up, wolf tooth, or the up coming hope version. But the concept certainly works and I would love to tryout the other versions to see the difference in shifting.

    Regarding chain wear. I doubt it'll be significant enough to notice. Especiallly if you keep you drive chain well maintain. 1x10 systems genrally wear better than 2x10 or 3x10 because your not cross chaining.

    I do like the fact that going 1x10 is so afordable. just ditch the front gear system, buy one front chain ring and add a large rear sprocket if yoy want the extra teeth for climbing.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by goto11 View Post
    I find the whole discussion about gearing to be fascinating, but let's be honest folks, it's not rocket science.

    The 3x drivetrain was the result of decades of refinement of gear ratios. It's pretty simple to figure out your gear ratios with a simple spreadsheet to see how much range is lost when you take away one or two chainrings. The weight difference is trivial, because the chainrings being removed are about the same weight as the sprockets being added.

    But humans are always suckers for something new, just for the sake of being new, and yes, it does seem to solve the issue of dropped chains, but this can also be addressed by simply letting up on the cranks while shifting, in addition to minimizing chain drops by setting up your chain length, b-tension and front derailleur correctly.

    We had 12-36 six-speed freewheels and cassettes with big ol' 46 tooth rings in front (and 48 or 50+ tooth rings for XC) back in the day before seven, then eight, then nine, and now ten and eleven speed drivetrains. Have I seen a lot of improvement in the way bikes shift, going from the original 6-speed indexed Deore XT to every Shimano/Suntour/SRAM combination of gears the bike industry has offered? Not really. Did smaller chainrings up front bring the weight down a lot? Not really, but the whole microdrive (i.e. sub 12-tooth and proportionally smaller chainring) fad sure did cause drivetrains to wear out quicker (fewer teeth equals more wear per tooth).

    SRAM and Shimano are trying to sell product. MTBR is trying to drive traffic. Bike magazines are trying to increase readership. It is all a big circle jerk. Shimano could make a seven, eight or nine speed 11-40 cassettes that worked with existing components and they would sell like crazy, but it would cannibalize their drivetrain sales. Why sell a cassette when they can persuade you to buy new shifters, derailleurs and cranks to go with it? And a new freehub body too.

    This is, for the greater part, marketing hype and offers little that cannot be found in a properly-tuned 3x6 drivetrain, circa 1987. I do not deny there is a small amount of engineering refinement going on here, but the key word is small. The bigger part is marketing.

    This whole trend of abolishing front chainrings is our day's Biopace. Engineering and logic may prevail, but marketing is a force to be reckoned with. Do yourself a favor and study up on gear ratios so you know what you are giving up before you dump those front chainrings.
    People have been using 1x drivetrains on trail bikes for years before XX1 came out, I've used a single ring up front since 2011, and I know others who've used it even longer than that. This is very much driven by the market, not the manufacturers trying to force something on us. If anything Shimano's seemingly reluctance to offer a dedicated 1x drivetrain at this point is trying to force us that 1x isn't the answer. 1x drivetrains have so many benefits, not just in simplified drivetrains but in frame and suspension designs. Granted, they won't be for everyone, but so many people could benefit from them if they just opened their eyes to something new and not just dismiss it as marketing B/S. Having run 1x for the last 3 years, even with an 11-36t cassette, I'll never go back to a double or triple, just too many compromises imo. The sooner more wide-range 1x options become available the better.

    If 3x6 is good for you, you're welcome to it!

  71. #71
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    The 42 tooth is great but you also need the 10 that xx1 gives you. I have a 32 up front on my xx1 and I spun out on The Whole Enchilada. I really suggest setting up your 10 speed 36x11-42.

    Question. Any one use a Shimano Zee FR rear derailleur with a 42 tooth? Cage to short?
    ‎"Reject your sense of injury and the injury itself disappears." -Marcus Aurelius

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffcoHo View Post
    Question. Any one use a Shimano Zee FR rear derailleur with a 42 tooth? Cage to short?
    Was wondering the same thing. I saw "mid cage" recommended, but will the ZEE FR work at all, or just less than ideal?

    Also thanks to all for the fascinating and diverse perspectives!

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by lawman1991 View Post
    People have been using 1x drivetrains on trail bikes for years before XX1 came out, I've used a single ring up front since 2011, and I know others who've used it even longer than that. This is very much driven by the market, not the manufacturers trying to force something on us. If anything Shimano's seemingly reluctance to offer a dedicated 1x drivetrain at this point is trying to force us that 1x isn't the answer. 1x drivetrains have so many benefits, not just in simplified drivetrains but in frame and suspension designs. Granted, they won't be for everyone, but so many people could benefit from them if they just opened their eyes to something new and not just dismiss it as marketing B/S. Having run 1x for the last 3 years, even with an 11-36t cassette, I'll never go back to a double or triple, just too many compromises imo. The sooner more wide-range 1x options become available the better.

    If 3x6 is good for you, you're welcome to it!
    I'll second this. When 10 speed came out, lots of us complained about needing more gear spread not more gears. 1x was already somewhat common since it resolved chain drop issues and clearance issues on FS bikes. I almost always shift 2 gears at a time, so bigger cog spacing would be a welcomed change. XX1 would give me the same spread as my 2x9 with one fewer gear ratios. Win! I'll agree 2x10 was change for the sake of change, but 1x11 is what I've really been asking for. The question now is if Shimano will realize their hard line stance of offering roady like gearing doesn't work for MTB.

    If they port over their 11 speed free hub with even further compromised flange spacing (and it looks like they are), then I'm done with them. Especially if their answer to XX1 is that along with electronically shifted 2x. Bleh. I can't think of anything I'd want less.

  74. #74
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    I don't mind a 2x on my summer bike but 1x really shines in the winter. Front der. really catch the crap and freeze up and no worky anymore. Maybe 1x was created to sell more crap but that crap works and I like buying bike crap.

  75. #75
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    Went with the Wolf Tooth. Went on quick and easy, definitely needed the longer bolt that came with it. If you shortened your chain, you may need to add links or get a new one. Mine was too short to accommodate the 42t.

    Early on in winter when my legs weren't ready I could REALLY have used this thing. Now that I've adjusted I haven't *needed* it so much, but when we get a fresh snow and it gets deep out there its dang nice to have. My knees are very thankful.

    Great group of local guys (to me) that also ride (as in first through the finishing line).

    Wish they came in orange to match the 907 Whiteout.

  76. #76
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    For me the narrow wide chainring 1x10 together with the clutch type derailleur was the best upgrade for last year for me. Maybe it started off as marketing, but ditching the FD, chainguide, getting lighter, and not hearing the clangor of chain hitting chainstay and derailleur cage is soooooooooooo sweet. Hype? I think not!

    The 42t cog, I think, will perfect the system by allowing you to regain the lost gear ratios by going 1x10. I got 2 Wolftooth (Wolfteeth?) and 2 OneUps on order, to go on SRAM and XT drivetrains. Direct comparison soon.
    SCB Nomad, SCB 5010v2, Turner RFX, Voodoo D-jab 650B, Voodoo Wazoo CX/commuter
    ...so far...

  77. #77
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    I preordered so I got the oneup for $85 including shipping, have yet to install it though as I need a r.der with a larger capacity.

    HOPE is also coming out with a cog:
    Hope: New Rims, Stems and More - Core Bike 2014 - Pinkbike

    Attachment 867642

  78. #78
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    My installation of wtc 42t didn't require changing the stock B screw
    Cranked it up a few and fine it tune it by backing down a bit . Shifts like a champ. This is on med xtr shadow plus RD

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegard View Post
    HOPE is also coming out with a cog:
    Attachment 867642
    Nice. This has definitely reached critical mass. Even if Shimano refuses to release an XX1 competitor, these products should expedite SRAM's release of X.9/X.7 1x11.

  80. #80
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    Agreed, total win-win for consumers. Affordable conversion to wide ratio cassette for 1x10 and cheaper 1x11 options for new bikes and people that want to spend the coin for the group.

  81. #81
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    Huh?

    People, and me, have been using 1x setups for years. I've looked up the gear ratios and done the math. A 42t will be nice for climbs but I don't "need" a 10t. I found a 36x11 is rather snappy and you actually produce more power "spinning" than mashing. My 3 months training with a powermeter taught me that. But again, another silly set of numbers.

    And also, as I've done my math on this as well, how does removing 2 chainings/with hardware/front der/left shifter/plus applicable cable and housing equal the weight of a sub 80 gram 42t aluminum cog? My apologizes if you're using something I have not heard about that weighs significantly more.
    In the immortal words of Socrates..."I drank what?"

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  82. #82
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    Damn" I want to see this bike!

    Quote Originally Posted by temporoad View Post
    Perfect colour match with the Raceface wide/narrow and the Oneup 42t green. This is going on my Krampus I had 2 x 10 on it moving to 1 x 10. My Oneup shipped from Delta BC.

  83. #83
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    A 44 x 11 gives you a 4:1 gear ratio. If you take away the big ring up front, then you aren't getting that back. The best you can hope for is a 40 x 10, but no one runs singles or doubles with 40-tooth rings. What's the weight savings? I estimate around 350g (3/4 lb.).

    It's a personal choice, but go into it with eyes open. The tall gears *are not* gotten back by adding a big cog out back.

    Many of the trails I ride can be either accessed by 25 minutes of driving or a bike-only shortcut that takes 20 minutes, due to the 4:1 gear ratio that I use. I may do the math of wheel circumference and crank revolutions per mile to illustrate what the difference is. I need my big rings for the riding I do. It's worth the extra weight for me.

  84. #84
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    Wolftooth products are solid, fair priced, and are not unobtainium.

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    Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

    Yes, you are giving up a 4:1 ratio, and on a mountain bike, no one needs a 4:1 ratio. Look at all the pro racers using XX1, even DH/enduro racers-- is the lack of a 4:1 holding them back? Nope.

    I spent much of last year racing on a 32t 1x10, 11-36 cogs in back. I frequently ride 30-45mins of roads to trailheads from my house. at 90rpm, I'm going almost 22mph in the 32-11 on my 29er. I finished top 5-10% out of 300-600 racers at multiple 50 milers. I never felt "geared out", on the (very few) downhill gravel sections where I could coast to 25mph I needed the break anyway. On the really flat, fast races I'll throw on a 34t chainring, but thats more to use the middle of my cassette rather than from being limited by a top gear of 32x11.

    For the vast vast majority of people, do you really need to push a gear that allows you go 30mph with a tailwind? Didn't think so. If you're riding scenarios frequently demand that, you need a CX or road bike.

    I was honestly nervous that I wouldn't have enough tall/fats gears on the 32t 1x10-- I hesitated to convert. Now that I have, I'm ashamed I didn't do it sooner.

    Quote Originally Posted by goto11 View Post
    A 44 x 11 gives you a 4:1 gear ratio. If you take away the big ring up front, then you aren't getting that back. The best you can hope for is a 40 x 10, but no one runs singles or doubles with 40-tooth rings. What's the weight savings? I estimate around 350g (3/4 lb.).

    It's a personal choice, but go into it with eyes open. The tall gears *are not* gotten back by adding a big cog out back.

    Many of the trails I ride can be either accessed by 25 minutes of driving or a bike-only shortcut that takes 20 minutes, due to the 4:1 gear ratio that I use. I may do the math of wheel circumference and crank revolutions per mile to illustrate what the difference is. I need my big rings for the riding I do. It's worth the extra weight for me.

  86. #86
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    11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    Quote Originally Posted by FM View Post
    Was wondering the same thing. I saw "mid cage" recommended, but will the ZEE FR work at all, or just less than ideal?

    Also thanks to all for the fascinating and diverse perspectives!
    I would think you'll need a
    Medium as that's what I would use on a 42t front ring and 34t rear sprocket.


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    Really? Naysayer with a history lesson. Same nonsense applied to no 29er, no 650b, no better drive train, no disc brakes, no dropper post no,no,no. I still have my circa 1980 mountain bike I ride to the grocery store to get milk but on the trails I'm sticking with my modern FS with all the bells and whistles. The question still remains is an inexpensive 1x drive train great or does it suck. Please share with us if you actually rode the new set-up and liked it or hated it.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

    Yes, you are giving up a 4:1 ratio, and on a mountain bike, no one needs a 4:1 ratio. Look at all the pro racers using XX1, even DH/enduro racers-- is the lack of a 4:1 holding them back? Nope.

    I spent much of last year racing on a 32t 1x10, 11-36 cogs in back. I frequently ride 30-45mins of roads to trailheads from my house. at 90rpm, I'm going almost 22mph in the 32-11 on my 29er. I finished top 5-10% out of 300-600 racers at multiple 50 milers. I never felt "geared out", on the (very few) downhill gravel sections where I could coast to 25mph I needed the break anyway. On the really flat, fast races I'll throw on a 34t chainring, but thats more to use the middle of my cassette rather than from being limited by a top gear of 32x11.

    For the vast vast majority of people, do you really need to push a gear that allows you go 30mph with a tailwind? Didn't think so. If you're riding scenarios frequently demand that, you need a CX or road bike.

    I was honestly nervous that I wouldn't have enough tall/fats gears on the 32t 1x10-- I hesitated to convert. Now that I have, I'm ashamed I didn't do it sooner.
    Good information. Thank you.

    My main bike is still a 3x9 26er, so I would be spinning more than a 29er with the same gears, and I like to avoid the 11-tooth when possible, since it's noticeably less efficient than the toothier cogs. Having ridden bikes since the friction shifter days (my first store-bought MTB was a 2 x 6, but I built a few n x 5 franken-MTBs before that), I'm admittedly very slow to adapt to all this new-fangled stuff. I remember clearly when a triple ring crankset was the upgrade, much like 1 x 11 is now.

    My original 1987 3x6 Deore XT drivetrain has thousands of miles on it and would still be a viable option if they made decent parts for it anymore. Maybe I'm being a nostalgic luddite about how well everything worked back then. It took me ten years to upgrade my main bike from a hardtail with thumb shifters to a FS bike with triggers. That doesn't mean I ignore or avoid new technology. I just keep the old stuff maintained and running until the parts are no longer serviceable. I'm happy with the 3x9 drivetrain on my FS bike and the 3x8 drivetrains on my hardtails. They work well for me, and I have spare parts to keep them going.

    Will I ever go with a single or double up front? Maybe, but not likely with a 26er. I can see how the bigger wheels mitigate the effects of a shorter top gear, so it may make more sense with my next bike, which will probably not be another 26er. Thanks to all of you guys, the prices will come down and it may one day make good economic sense for me. But for the time being, I'm not paying more to get less, when what I've got works great. As for weight savings, that's nice and all, but my FS bike is already pretty light and my racing days are behind me, so it's not a big factor for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by juansevo View Post
    Huh?

    People, and me, have been using 1x setups for years. I've looked up the gear ratios and done the math. A 42t will be nice for climbs but I don't "need" a 10t. I found a 36x11 is rather snappy and you actually produce more power "spinning" than mashing. My 3 months training with a powermeter taught me that. But again, another silly set of numbers.

    And also, as I've done my math on this as well, how does removing 2 chainings/with hardware/front der/left shifter/plus applicable cable and housing equal the weight of a sub 80 gram 42t aluminum cog? My apologizes if you're using something I have not heard about that weighs significantly more.
    NO WAY! I thought SRAM created something new............. (Sarcasm)

    I think why people like the 1x11 (or x10) is the larger rear cog that allows us mere mortals to climb those steeper pitches.

    Didn't you have to use a chain guide without the wide/narrow xx set up?
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

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    Any reason why this wouldn't work with 1x9? Lets say a spacer is used to space out the 42t cog just right for a 1x9, in theory it should work.
    What you say?

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    11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    Any reason why this wouldn't work with 1x9? Lets say a spacer is used to space out the 42t cog just right for a 1x9, in theory it should work.
    What you say?
    It works. My buddy has followed my lead and removed the pins out of his cassette and removed the middle cog. He does have a large 7t gap between cogs but it still shifts. The alternative is to remove the first gear but he found he was spinning out.


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    ^Thickness of cogs?

    Jump from 34 to 42 would be big?

    Work? Perhaps. Optimal? Probably not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    Any reason why this wouldn't work with 1x9? Lets say a spacer is used to space out the 42t cog just right for a 1x9, in theory it should work.
    What you say?
    I've been wondering the same thing myself. I'd also like to know if it will work with an 8-speed cassette, turning it into 9-speed. My monstercross bike has 8-speed bar-con shifters with the "extra click" that will shift into a ninth gear if present (much like old 7-speed thumb shifters would work with 8-speed cassettes). I feel ancient.

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    Quote Originally Posted by da peach View Post
    ^Thickness of cogs?

    Jump from 34 to 42 would be big?

    Work? Perhaps. Optimal? Probably not.
    do to the spacer supports toward the top of the 42t the chain will not sit on the 34 clog properly.
    BBB (big beautiful bike)

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by spankone View Post
    It works. My buddy has followed my lead and removed the pins out of his cassette and removed the middle cog. He does have a large 7t gap between cogs but it still shifts. The alternative is to remove the first gear but he found he was spinning out.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Would you mind posting up your setup?

    Quote Originally Posted by da peach View Post
    ^Thickness of cogs?

    Jump from 34 to 42 would be big?

    Work? Perhaps. Optimal? Probably not.
    34t-42t is quit a big jump, I was thinking of going with another option of a 40-42t.


    Quote Originally Posted by temporoad View Post
    do to the spacer supports toward the top of the 42t the chain will not sit on the 34 clog properly.
    I was thinking of using a spacer to take up that space where the support is.

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    11-42T conversion: OneUp vs. Wolf Tooth

    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    Would you mind posting up your setup?


    34t-42t is quit a big jump, I was thinking of going with another option of a 40-42t.




    I was thinking of using a spacer to take up that space where the support is.
    He talks about his 1x9 sp set up on here

    http://youtu.be/jtPJxbo0EGo

    My set up is a 1x10 xt crank xt shadow plus rear mech, slx shifter and rear cassette race face narrow wide.

    I'm running a 34t front and a 11-38 rear cassette with the 17t cog removed. The slx cassette is pinned so I had to drill the pins out.














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    Got my One Up....installation was a breeze, shifting is so smooth, no noticeable difference from original 1070 cassette. Quite surprised actually

    Attachment 867746

    Attachment 867744

    Attachment 867745

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsolti13 View Post
    Got my One Up....installation was a breeze, shifting is so smooth, no noticeable difference from original 1070 cassette. Quite surprised actually
    So you modified a 1070 cassette? Thanks in advance.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  99. #99
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    Deliver status on my one up says delivered. Yipeee... Are you guys adding links to your chain?

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffcoHo View Post
    The 42 tooth is great but you also need the 10 that xx1 gives you. I have a 32 up front on my xx1 and I spun out on The Whole Enchilada. I really suggest setting up your 10 speed 36x11-42.
    No you do not, the difference from 11 to 10 is too small to make a difference. 10 is an overdrive only in respect to 12, that is what the SRAM cassette comes with, not in respect to the standard 11. If you really want an extra gear in respect to 11 (but why?) you have to go to 9, like Leonardi Racing is doing.

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