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  1. #1
    CAN YOU DIG IT??!!??!!!??
    Reputation: man w/ one hand's Avatar
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    What dropper post can take DH?

    For those who climb to get to th DH...what dropper post are you running? Been lookin hard at th Gravity dropper as i understand it's supposed to be low maintenance.

    Any advice?

    Thanx.
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  2. #2
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    Don't, just get a quick release collar. I ride 8-10 hours on my TR (soon Session), and have never noticed any need for a dropper. I lift my seat up when I pedal and put it down when I'm on top of a hill. Don't see why you want to complicate things and add weight as well.
    If you're set on the idea though, I'd recommend the Gravity Dropper.
    2011 Custom Transition TR250

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pädi View Post
    Don't, just get a quick release collar. I ride 8-10 hours on my TR (soon Session), and have never noticed any need for a dropper. I lift my seat up when I pedal and put it down when I'm on top of a hill. Don't see why you want to complicate things and add weight as well.
    If you're set on the idea though, I'd recommend the Gravity Dropper.
    Agreed. You're only going to add weight, expense, & fragility to your DH rig. If you must use a dropper-post anyway, I can say that I've seen the Gravity Dropper hold up better than anything else out there.

  4. #4
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    Not the best proof(Im old and small), but I run a Kind KS900 and since my bike goes uphill like water goes downhill, I'd never ride without it unless I was riding only lift served trails. My post survived a week at Whistler and still works great.
    As to the weight Padi mentioned...I'm like WWWWHATTT?????? you're concerned about that much weight on a DH bike?
    Strength wise, the only time you put much impact seat load on a post is going downhill, which is when you'd have the post full down which is likely unbreakable in that position.
    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 100% non stock 29 lbs
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

  5. #5
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    Seems unnecessary if its only 1 up and 1 down. However, I'd stick with a non remote dropper, less lines to snag and less chance of smashing the remote. Definitely stay away from a Reverb for this reason, replacing a Reverb remote is not cheap.

    Also be wary of how the post clamps the saddle rails. A single m8 bolt or a single bolt like the old X Fusion Hilo is no good.

  6. #6
    CAN YOU DIG IT??!!??!!!??
    Reputation: man w/ one hand's Avatar
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    My arm I have to use when I ride positionz me over my seat and I end up doing most of my pedaling seated & I end up trashing seat rails more than most people do (8mm) rails on a WTB Aviator. I do a lot of all mtn stuff too so I'm lookin for functional durability
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  7. #7
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    I am going to disagree with most of the posts here.

    I have a Reverb Stealth on my AM rig and I couldn't be happier. The post itself is solid, I haven't heard of anyone breaking it, and I doubt it would under normal riding. The remote does present a problem somewhat being on top of the handlebar, every time I would flip my bike over to bars to work on it, the remote would activate and the post would elevate the bike reeking havoc... I cured this by switching sides and putting the remote on "upside down" which is a lot closer to where my thumb naturally is anyways. The cable on the stealth version tucks away nicely with all the others (my frame already has an open seat tube at the bottom, so this makes it much easier).

    The function of the post is what really gets me! Unlimited height settings, and when bled properly, the speed dial makes it nice and slow up to POP, there's your seat! All the way up for pedaling up sections, and with a push of a button no more complicated than shifting, you can drop down into descent mode. The range on the travel is nice too, all the way down for the steepest of them, somewhere in the middle for w/e type of trail you happen to be on.

    Alright, rant off for the reverb. I also was looking at the KS-Lev, it also has unlimited travel and the hose attaches at the base near the seat collar, so no dangly hose when switching positions.

  8. #8
    backwoods and backwards
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
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    I have a gravity dropper classic on my blindside...holding up well after a full season on it.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  9. #9
    RideDirt
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    If your literally just climbing up to get to the top of the hill then your fine with a normal seatpost , but if your doing multiple climbs to get to the top of the hill then your prob good to go with a gravity dropper . I had a reverb and never had an issue with it on my AM bike but i would never put one on a DH bike only cuz i ride at bike parks .

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by man w/ one hand View Post
    My arm I have to use when I ride positionz me over my seat and I end up doing most of my pedaling seated & I end up trashing seat rails more than most people do (8mm) rails on a WTB Aviator. I do a lot of all mtn stuff too so I'm lookin for functional durability
    the kS lev at 150mm drop sounds like the ticket. It gets out of the way more than others for some serious dh, the cable actuates from the bottom so doesn't flop around when your shredding with the post down, no need to bleed when swapping out the post as it uses cable not hydro. I've used the ks i900 with no issue, haven't tried the lev yet. I have ridden with others on the lev that have no issues.

  11. #11
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    I have a couple of friends that have the Kindshock IS900 lever (not remote) Lever seems like the way to go to me since there is not extra cable and also if you ever want to run a standard post you just pull it out. Less moving parts and less things to go wrong. Plus DH bikes are pretty damn stable so it shouldn't be too bad to reach down real quick to adjust it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhill View Post
    I have a couple of friends that have the Kindshock IS900 lever (not remote) Lever seems like the way to go to me since there is not extra cable and also if you ever want to run a standard post you just pull it out. Less moving parts and less things to go wrong. Plus DH bikes are pretty damn stable so it shouldn't be too bad to reach down real quick to adjust it.
    Good advice.... for a man with two hands.
    Last edited by squiby; 03-15-2013 at 10:33 AM.

  13. #13
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    I have 2 Reverbs, one on my ReignX(used for gravity), and I love it. Ive never used any other dropper post. Its great for runs with long pedaling areas, and climbing. If I did own a full on DH rig I would probably put some kind of dropper post on it. The Reverbs main weaknesses are where the hose attaches to the remote and seat post. Ive only had a problem with the cable where it attaches to the remote, but that was my fault *facepalm*. Also the reverb remote could be designed better. It seems that most of these seat posts are pretty hardy.

  14. #14
    CAN YOU DIG IT??!!??!!!??
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    Another question, do the seats tend to be rigid or a bit loose on dropper posts? I've heard of the earier versions having "wiggly" seats...any light to shed on this thought?
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossup View Post
    As to the weight Padi mentioned...I'm like WWWWHATTT?????? you're concerned about that much weight on a DH bike?
    Was just listing some negative things, more hoses, more controls, more things to bleed, more weight, less strength, more expenses.

    I'd personally never get one, even if I'd have an AM bike. Not to even mention my fr/dh bike. Have had multiple rides on different posts, and I'm yet to see the point in them.

    //And you're the one posting your bike's weight in your sig..
    2011 Custom Transition TR250

  16. #16
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    If you do decide to run a dropper, the best thing about running one on a DH bike is you typically don't have front derailleurs/shifters. That means you can run a right side remote upside down under the bars on the left side (really good idea for the Reverb remote). I don't really see a need for one on my DH bike, but there ya go.

    Best use case seems to be for bikes without full length seat tubes where you have to cut the post down quite a bit to drop the saddle all the way, then run into minimum insertion issues with the post at full extension. If you have to climb on the bike, sometimes that is the only way to get your saddle at optimum pedaling height.
    Gotta get up to get down.
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  17. #17
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    I just started a thread about going uphill on my downhill bike and this thread relates to mine because I will need a longer seat post if I'm going to start going up hill. I was thinking about a dropper post too but I'm probably just gonna go with a long seat post and a quick release. My dh bike is heavy enough so dropper post would just add more weight.

  18. #18
    backwoods and backwards
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    Quote Originally Posted by man w/ one hand View Post
    Another question, do the seats tend to be rigid or a bit loose on dropper posts? I've heard of the earier versions having "wiggly" seats...any light to shed on this thought?
    The GD has a little play to it, but I never notice it while riding. I noticed no play at all on the command post or the reverb. If you run sram stuff the remote on the reverb will go on the came clamp as the shifter if that help you out ( that part of the set-up is super clean)

    I have owned all three and the GD is the only one still on my bikes.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  19. #19
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    Didn't mean to sound personal, your comment only triggered my thought, I actually got your drift.
    Guilty as charged on the weight, obviously I'm a weight weenie BUT also obviously I'm not above adding weight with a purpose.
    And for those who haven't run across me here already, here's my ride with the KS900, the only post I have for my ONE-What dropper post can take DH?-100_1638a.jpgWhat dropper post can take DH?-100_1639a.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by Pädi View Post
    Was just listing some negative things, more hoses, more controls, more things to bleed, more weight, less strength, more expenses.

    I'd personally never get one, even if I'd have an AM bike. Not to even mention my fr/dh bike. Have had multiple rides on different posts, and I'm yet to see the point in them.

    //And you're the one posting your bike's weight in your sig..
    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 100% non stock 29 lbs
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

  20. #20
    Pro Crastinator
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    you're gonna need a bar extension on your left side if you keep adding more contraptions...


  21. #21
    adamant
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    i've used Gravity Dropper and Reverb on my "do-everything" bike and Reverb on my DH bike. Yes it adds weight, cost,... BUT it also adds the ability to pedal the bike! Demo it on your bike and see how it works for you.
    IMHO a bar-mounted control is a must
    What dropper post can take DH?-demo82_038.jpg

  22. #22
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    Running Reverb on my SC Butcher and X-fusion Hilo on my 456 without any issues. I mounted the Reverb remote on the left side and upside down or under the bar to prevent being broken. So far works great

  23. #23
    CAN YOU DIG IT??!!??!!!??
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    you're gonna need a bar extension on your left side if you keep adding more contraptions...
    Almost painted th wall with my drink when I read this...

    Just to clarify, I'm riding a 1st gen Nomad w/1 1/8" ht, Talas 180 w/FIT cart, CCDB air, Outlaw wheels and I end up spending alot more time in the saddle than i'd like to but my arm's configurated leaning more towards DH than anything else. So, I'm positioned over the seat and basically "have to" use it for 90% of my climbing & I tend to bend seat rails when I hit lips/jumps/drops that are fairly small & in th middle of a short up-n-down sections that you wouldn't take the time to lower your seat for. I.E. the seatpost is a lil too high for jumping & etc. causing me to drop my ol' tired ass a lil too hard on th saddle messing up a saddle waaay to early....like after a month of riding. Gets a bit costly.
    Thanx alot for all of the info guys, oh AND WCH'z insightfull wisdom.
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  24. #24
    banjo plunker, wrench
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    I would add to the insights by saying try to get one the "correct" size for you frame...i.e., Santa Cruz takes a 30.9mm? So, I wouldn't use a shim. I've sold several of the Giant dropper posts that seem to be doing okay with the riders. It is simple, cost is very low, spec'd on many of their AM bikes, and uses your weight for an infinite range of height adjustment, and comes in two mast lengths 375 and 400mm...
    any time spent riding a bicycle is re-cycled goodness....

  25. #25
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    I'd consider a dropper post for my DH rig. I never have my seat slammed down, its usually a few inches up. I can see using it to drop the seat all the way over steep stuff and drops and pop the seat up a few inches for the flatter terrain where pedaling is involved.
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er
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