• 01-18-2013
    gritzandgravy
    In the process of converting my XC bike to more of a DH bike
    Hi all,

    Currently I have a 2011 trek remedy 7:

    A mountain next to me (Blue Mtn. in PA) will be starting to have DH biking this spring! In all my excitement I am in the process of making my bike more tuned for DH. Other than the stock components found in the above link I have added a chain guide and new beefier brakes.

    1) The chain guide I installed is a MRP G2 Mini

    2) and a set of Avid Code R brakes

    Putting those components aside I am moving onto suspension. I feel like my front suspension is much more substantial than my rear, meaning my rear is much more likely to bottom out easier. I did some research and saw that coil suspension is the way to go for DH bikes. Due to my lack of $$ i cannot replace both the front and rear with coil, so I thought about replacing my rear shock (Fox Float RP 2) So my main question is, would it be awkward having an air suspension for the front and coil for the rear??

    Secondly if you have any other recommendations please post! Please keep in mind, in addition to DH I would still like to do some XC at the state park next to me. I would be reluctant in making extreme mods only suited for DH courses.

    Thanks
  • 01-18-2013
    jakester29959
    No it wouldn't be awkward. I have a fox rc4 in the rear and a rockshox totem in the front and that is air.
  • 01-18-2013
    DYI01
    I would probably get some wider high volume tires, short stem/wide bar combo, and just ride the bike as it is.
  • 01-18-2013
    gritzandgravy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DYI01 View Post
    I would probably get some wider high volume tires, short stem/wide bar combo, and just ride the bike as it is.

    I believe my tires are like 2.3 or 2.4" wide, is that not enough or do i need wider? What kind of tire pressure do you typically run?
  • 01-18-2013
    mullen119
    Blue mountain is starting to have DH trails? Lift access?

    Looks like I need to add another stop to me summer plans :thumbsup:
  • 01-18-2013
    bengxe
    A stronger wheelset with dual ply tires would be a good idea. You'll definitely want dual ply tires at blue mountain.
  • 01-18-2013
    b-kul
    no, but that bike will never cut it as a full on park sled. id rent if you can.
  • 01-18-2013
    mullen119
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    no, but that bike will never cut it as a full on park sled. id rent if you can.

    I dont know, I use a Jamis XAM as my DH bike and has never given me a problem and I do lift access DH fairly often over the summer. The remedy 7 is fairly comparable. I would put a longer fork on it to slack it out a bit and ride it. :thumbsup:
  • 01-18-2013
    thefriar
    +1... 2.5'' dual ply tires and burly wheelset first with wider bars... if you like it enough, rent a couple times and then decide if you really want to go bigger bike

    ... get full face and all armor.... and see if you really like it.

    Then +1 on rent.

    So rent 1 day is ~$100-$150, ride maybe 10-15 lift serve days a season and you're at $1000 - $1250, which is, depending on your DH bike maybe 1/3 or new price... so three seasons to make that rental up, and if you ride there enough you'll know your set ups. Or 1 season means a new fork. If you're getting 15+, buy a sled.

    If you like trail riding and DH but only have enough cheese for one rig, look at a used knolly delirium or intense uzzi, something burly enough for days and days on the hill but not going to hurt as much as a DH bike on a trail ride...

    DH is expensive when you do lift tickets and maintenance for a season (brake bleeds, derailiers, rims, spokes, pedals, cables, etc... and that's not including upgrades); toss in armor and bike it gets expensive quick.

    If you DH your Remedy more than 5 times, I'm going to guess it will break and you'll need to wait for a warranty frame if you're progressing and pushing the bike. I have a buddy who was about 180#s and he took his out a couple times, it didn't last a season with 2 DH runs and some aggressive trail riding...
  • 01-18-2013
    jmallory
    If you plan on riding the park regularly (more than 10 or so times a season) I'd just buy a used dedicated DH bike if I were you. By the time you sink a bunch of new parts into your Remedy, you'd be pretty damn close to a used bike. You'll be happier with a DH bike rather than a beefed up trail bike. If I were you...
  • 01-18-2013
    Drth Vadr
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jmallory View Post
    If you plan on riding the park regularly (more than 10 or so times a season) I'd just buy a used dedicated DH bike if I were you. By the time you sink a bunch of new parts into your Remedy, you'd be pretty damn close to a used bike. You'll be happier with a DH bike rather than a beefed up trail bike. If I were you...

    I've ridden Blue before, you can ride it and have fun on a Remedy (increased pucker factor). A DH rig or a FR Scratch type bike would be better . Ride it and rent a few time, then buy a rental at the end of the season when they sell them.
  • 01-19-2013
    singlesprocket
    looks like you already invested into the bike, i wouldn't worry about the rear shock. get yourself a fox 36 160mm 20mm through axle for the front... even a used one will do the trick...

    here's a rig i've converted for dh... sorta like what you are doing...

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...n/P1019746.jpg

    though, for 2013 i'll be running a tr250
  • 01-19-2013
    schlockinz
    I'd rent and try it, or borrow a bike if you can. I've seen people do "DH" on remedies, and it works okay, but you'll get a little more pucker. If you really like DH, I'd pick up a used bike and not waste time converting yours. Or, you could ditch the remedy and pick up something a little bigger. An enduro, the one, rune, wildcard, something that you can still pedal all around with a grin factor, but slap some beefier wheels on and lift or shuttle ride all day without as much worry about breakage and wear.
  • 01-19-2013
    b-kul
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    I dont know, I use a Jamis XAM as my DH bike and has never given me a problem and I do lift access DH fairly often over the summer. The remedy 7 is fairly comparable. I would put a longer fork on it to slack it out a bit and ride it. :thumbsup:

    same intended use but the xam frame is almost 8 pounds.
  • 01-19-2013
    gritzandgravy
    Great info all around that i'm getting, thanks guys! Seems like the general consensus is that I need dual ply tires. Unfortunately I haven't really considered that when I bought a set of tires last summer. I would be more willingly to change them now, but I was unable to properly seat my last time due to how tedious my Duster rims are. Will this just hinder my riding abilities or put me in more danger because of tire failure (not that i wont have enough doing DH for the first time)??

    I'll def consider renting a DH bike just to see how it feels. The process I'm in is justing seeing if I like DH without getting fully committed. At this point I will probably stop upgrading, buy my pass, possibly get dual ply tires, and ride to see how I like it.
  • 01-20-2013
    MOJO K
    DH is tough on tires...not enough rubber/sidewall and it'll be a short session. If you might have to swap tires on one set of rims for a while just go back to a tube set-up. The other up-grade that's worth looking at is jumping to 8" rotors. Ride with full protection!!!

    I've had mixed luck renting bikes and have found that I'm always happier running my own gear. Bringing your trailbike out to the lifts a couple of times won't kill it if you keep away from the biggest hits and you'll still get a feel for what gravity riding is.
  • 01-20-2013
    Tim F.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gritzandgravy View Post
    Great info all around that i'm getting, thanks guys! Seems like the general consensus is that I need dual ply tires. Unfortunately I haven't really considered that when I bought a set of tires last summer. I would be more willingly to change them now, but I was unable to properly seat my last time due to how tedious my Duster rims are. Will this just hinder my riding abilities or put me in more danger because of tire failure (not that i wont have enough doing DH for the first time)??

    I'll def consider renting a DH bike just to see how it feels. The process I'm in is justing seeing if I like DH without getting fully committed. At this point I will probably stop upgrading, buy my pass, possibly get dual ply tires, and ride to see how I like it.

    Running singleply tires your much more likely to pinch tubes, or even the side walls of singleply tubless tires. In addition to dinging your rims.
  • 01-20-2013
    gritzandgravy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    DH is tough on tires...not enough rubber/sidewall and it'll be a short session. If you might have to swap tires on one set of rims for a while just go back to a tube set-up. The other up-grade that's worth looking at is jumping to 8" rotors. Ride with full protection!!!

    I've had mixed luck renting bikes and have found that I'm always happier running my own gear. Bringing your trailbike out to the lifts a couple of times won't kill it if you keep away from the biggest hits and you'll still get a feel for what gravity riding is.

    _____
    I made sure when I bought the Code R brake set to get the 203mm rotors, that was the first thing I wanted to be able to do....stop lol. I also got a full face helmet and goggles, gloves...etc. So for the tires is their a good brand or model to go to or should I should look up any dual ply tires?
  • 01-20-2013
    schlockinz
    You can find 2.6 ardent's on sale (not the greatest tire, but not bad either). I've yet to pinch a tube with one of these (knocks on wood), but then again, my runs are short, but still rocky, so my experience may be different.

    I also run a Geax Neuron, pretty good tire, tough as nails, and a pain to set. Similar tread to the ardent, usually costs more and I think its truer to its real size.
  • 01-20-2013
    hafnz
    Don't want to start waving red flags for no reason, but aren't the DRCV shocks the only shocks that work with the Trek Remedy top link?
    I think I read something along those lines a few years ago, when they first came out, but I'm not sure if that's still an issue now.
  • 01-20-2013
    cerebroside
    Not my bike, but it is possible:
    http://i.imgur.com/nHIoB5q.jpg
  • 01-20-2013
    hafnz
    Right, I've also found this link now, so carry on, nevermind me.
  • 01-20-2013
    gritzandgravy
    [QUOTE=hafnz;10090740]Right, I've also found this

    ___

    Awesome link! I had no idea a conversion kit was needed. But considering the your link has the same bike as me and the rear coil shock I want, I should be easily able to do this on my own.

    Thanks
  • 01-20-2013
    hafnz
    The same guy also posted in Mtbr and that has a few more replies:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/trek/diy-trek...on-719504.html
  • 01-20-2013
    mullen119
    Your bike will be fine as long as you dont do huge drops. I see no need to get a full DH bike until you start pushing the limits of what your current bike can handle. New tires are a good idea. Maybe keep an eye out for a good deal on a 36, Lyrik, or similar to slacken the front a bit.