Page 39 of 42 FirstFirst ... 293536373839404142 LastLast
Results 1,901 to 1,950 of 2091
  1. #1901
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GiantBren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    There's not much complexity in that area. Behind the seal there's a bore and a pressed-in bushing sits there. Axle goes through it and is greased. The pedal may just need an overhaul (as in disassemble, clean, grease, assemble). Worst case: bushing replacement, though a year sounds like too early for that. Spare bushings for Nukeproof pedals are available at CRC.

    PS.
    Well, for completeness: there's also the "worstest" case that involves eroded/rusted bearing surface on the axle itself. But it's even less probable than a bushing that needs replacement after only a year of riding.

    Compare pedal bodies for play. If the leaky one has noticeably more play than the other one, that's reason to start worrying and looking what's inside.
    Took the pedals apart and greased everything,one of the nuts were loose now its smooth as new with no leaks.
    2015 Giant Stance 2-1x10
    2013 Trek 3700 Disc-City Cruiser

  2. #1902
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 69tr6r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    527
    Has anyone seen or tried these yet? Catalyst pedal from the guy that preaches about flat pedals in general being awesome, which they are!

    http://pedalinginnovations.com/

  3. #1903
    NWS
    NWS is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,366
    Makes perfect sense to me.
    Next time I need pedals I'll try it.

  4. #1904
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    Hmm but moving feet forward on pedals may break the assumptions that the bike's geometry was based upon. We then need a longer stem to maintain (standing cockpit) reach, and we change weight distribution, loading front wheel more and rear wheel less.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  5. #1905
    NWS
    NWS is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,366
    For some of us, these pedals just match how we already ride. It's something I've been compensating for using stiff-soled shoes, though I'll admit I didn't think of it that way until I saw that pedal design.

    Changing foot placement doesn't necessarily affect bike geo choices. I still want my CG in the same place, so my upper body is still in the same place.

    If you like riding with the ball of your foot on the axle, you should try putting the axle further back. You might like it, especially for jumping. I still use my toes for XCish stuff, but for descending I ride more like that web site described.

  6. #1906
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    I've been trying it for about a year on several occasions, but wasn't convinced. Maybe the soles on my AM40s are worn too much, forcing me to revert to the position I had with Straitline AMPs which caused most of the wear (will retry with new AM41s), or maybe it's just me being flat footed.

  7. #1907
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metrotuned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,757

    Cool-blue Rhythm Platform Pedals Interbike 2015 forward

    Just when I was going to write off Crank Brothers, they come out with the most striking platform pedal of Interbike 2015. They were in prototype form on display at the booth, but I'm looking forward to them. Also, XPEDO Zen is another highlight that adds fire to the platform pedal field.

    I'm in the market right now to put a big set of platform pedals on my single speed full rigid. Going through my thread, my appetite is still wet. There is growth in the field and not even close to saturated even with hundreds of styles (hundreds or tens?)

    Top to bottom: Burgtec MK4, Deity purple haze, Crank Brothers big and small sizes (just like Syntace model)

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-platform-pedals-burgtec-deity-crank-brothers.jpg
    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  8. #1908
    unrooted
    Reputation: unrooted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,195
    If you want durable pedals then avoid crank brothers and canfeild.
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  9. #1909
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    265
    So for me Saints are the best pedals. Not only are they bulletproof, but Shimano has the best costumer service. I used them very hard for more than year and a half, I had rock strikes that almost send me over the bars, finally they developed some play, called Shimano, sent old pedals it, got new pedals no questions asked. As far as I understand, no other company does this. This pedal is not the thinnest or the lightest, but its the most indestructible pedal that I used and Shimano has the best service.

  10. #1910
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    So for me Saints are the best pedals. Not only are they bulletproof, but Shimano has the best costumer service. I used them very hard for more than year and a half, I had rock strikes that almost send me over the bars, finally they developed some play, called Shimano, sent old pedals it, got new pedals no questions asked. As far as I understand, no other company does this. This pedal is not the thinnest or the lightest, but its the most indestructible pedal that I used and Shimano has the best service.
    +1 for Saints. I have Spank Spikes - ball bearings seized after six months, DMR Vaults - one pedal had no grease in it and the bushing wore out in a month, Saints - after three years they are still perfect, I service them and fill them with grease once a year. And they cost less than the full rebuild kit for the Spank Spikes...

  11. #1911
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,430
    I would use the Saints because they're awesome in just about every way but I could never use a pedal that's that thick. I tend to roll the pedals when having to sit and pedal hard going uphill on rough terrain. Going from a 17mm thick pedal to a 6-10mm thick pedal has made a world of difference. I also love the convex design which is something I never thought I would say.

    Has anyone actually had a reliability problem with Crampon Mags? I see people saying they're not reliable but with little real world experiences. I admittedly didn't read all 40 pages of this thread though. I'm 240lbs without gear and have had nothing but great experience with them. There's very, very little play in them but some play is normal anyway and they're supposed to be tightened periodically. I would like to know if "problems" have gone beyond the little bit of play that can be tightened out.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  12. #1912
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,430
    Quote Originally Posted by 950sm07 View Post
    +1 for Saints. I have Spank Spikes - ball bearings seized after six months, DMR Vaults - one pedal had no grease in it and the bushing wore out in a month, Saints - after three years they are still perfect, I service them and fill them with grease once a year. And they cost less than the full rebuild kit for the Spank Spikes...
    That's sad to hear, I love the Spikes. Was it one or both bearings that seized? Did they see a lot of wet/muddy conditions?
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  13. #1913
    mtbr member
    Reputation: D Bone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    661
    Quote Originally Posted by BuickGN View Post
    That's sad to hear, I love the Spikes. Was it one or both bearings that seized? Did they see a lot of wet/muddy conditions?
    Just for comparisons sake, I have Spank Oozys (same architecture as Spikes) and they have been absolutely bullet proof. I'm 215lbs all geared up and ride aggressively, although I never ride in the wet.

  14. #1914
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    Eww!



    I'd like to try these but certainly not in that color.

  15. #1915
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    991
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Eww!


    I'd like to try these but certainly not in that color.
    non replaceable pins, no thanks

  16. #1916
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    With plastic bodies (and plastic pins), whole pedals are supposed to be replaceable. Since I don't get many pedal strikes, it makes a lot of sense for me. Plastic pins are much easier on shoe soles and I even stopped wearing knee-shin guards once I converted to plastic pedals.

  17. #1917
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    991
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    With plastic bodies (and plastic pins), whole pedals are supposed to be replaceable. Since I don't get many pedal strikes, it makes a lot of sense for me. Plastic pins are much easier on shoe soles and I even stopped wearing knee-shin guards once I converted to plastic pedals.
    Ah I didn't realize they were plastic. Not my thing although I've heard good things about composite pedals. Brave of you to stop wearing leg protection

  18. #1918
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    Quote Originally Posted by csermonet View Post
    Brave of you to stop wearing leg protection
    Oh no, I was just lazy to put it on at all times since going to plastics, and noticed that I get away with just scratches every time there's an "accident", so I stopped wearing it entirely. Large area, long shaped, but still superficial skin damage. The pins on my current plastic pedals (Kore Rivera Thermo) are dull by design unlike DMR V6 though.

  19. #1919
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    991
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Oh no, I was just lazy to put it on at all times since going to plastics, and noticed that I get away with just scratches every time there's an "accident", so I stopped wearing it entirely. Large area, long shaped, but still superficial skin damage. The pins on my current plastic pedals (Kore Rivera Thermo) are dull by design unlike DMR V6 though.
    I'm more weary of damage from rocks and roots. I use e13 lg1 pedals and don't wear shin protection because I rarely slip a pedal, but i will throw on knee pads when riding high speed stuff

  20. #1920
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    Well, yes. I could use some soft, lightweight knee pads too. Mine are hard shell knee-shin, and they are overkill now. Maybe I should invest in some ++comfortable, long lasting, minimalist ones that are quick to put on and off.

  21. #1921
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metrotuned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,757

    Nylon Flat Platform Pedals

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-metrotuned-mtbr-nylon-flat-platform-pedals.jpg

    I've also been eyeing the sealed bearing plastic / nylon pedals on the market, mostly because they're under $30 shipped and offer functionality equal to many of the $100 aluminum bodied counterparts with the same internals - namely sealed bearings. BMX riders use loose ball nylon pedals and they destroy their bikes frequently. ...the ability of going through 3 pedal sets for each 1 high end pedal set.

    Maybe not a larger "VP Harrier" 120mmx110mm and 12mm thick size, which I find valuable, but typically around 100mmx100mm and 16mm thick and between 250-350g in weight depending on molded pins vs replaceable alloy pins.

    Here are a number of pedals I've been researching:

    Fyxation Mesa
    Nukeproof Electron Evo
    Monster Redline
    VP Push
    Premium Slim PC
    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  22. #1922
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metrotuned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,757

    DMR Bikes V12 Magnesium Flat Pedals

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-dmr-v12-mag.jpg

    Have a set of DMR V12 Mag's coming in to put on my full rigid single speed secondary mountain bike. <$70. They're larger 105x115x17 and fully sealed bearings which is what I was looking for (i cannot stand play and "one season" durability - especially since I pedal a lot riding to and from the trailhead and even use the bike for commuting distance on mixed terrain). The original V12 pre-2014 design was based off the chunky but dependable iconic Shimano DX pedal. The post 2014 revision of the V12 is not as chiseled as the Vault, but similar platform shape, going for that convex'ness which is missing from any thin pedal with only 2-3mm of convex (flat). It's also 1/2 the price. Weight is 350g for the pair. Keep in mind that when I authored this thread, I was looking at pedals in the 500-800g, especially those hammer mallet shin grinding chunky Brooklyn Machine Works Veggieburger flats.
    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  23. #1923
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metrotuned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,757
    @BuickGN I'd like to hear your review of them after at least 500 miles of use or a season of use in relation to the bearing/bushing life of the Crampon Mags. Since they're made by HT, many of the feedback stories are destroyed pedals from the bearings and bushings. I cannot tell you how disappointing and time consuming it is to deal with bearing issues on pedals. There needs to be a balance with function/form and durability/weight. A smart man once said here on MTBR that the contact points are not the places where you want to save weight. The pedals for sure are up there along with a proper fitting saddle!

    @J. Random Psycho the nylon pedal post was for you. Nylon is intriguing. There seems to be no weight penalty versus aluminum and the replaceable aspect makes a lot of sense considering the 1/3 or even 1/4 cost of aluminum comparables. The entry cost is what appeals and if manufacturers can use quality end caps (not plastic BMX-esque), it actually makes choosing nylon pedals possible.
    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  24. #1924
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    Oh I figured it. ^_^
    After a year of riding them, I'm definitely sold on plastic body/molded pin pedals.
    (but my riding has been mostly DJ lately, with some urban for when I have business in the city or the DJ spot is too muddy)
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  25. #1925
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,660
    Quote Originally Posted by BuickGN View Post
    I would use the Saints because they're awesome in just about every way but I could never use a pedal that's that thick. I tend to roll the pedals when having to sit and pedal hard going uphill on rough terrain. Going from a 17mm thick pedal to a 6-10mm thick pedal has made a world of difference. I also love the convex design which is something I never thought I would say.

    Has anyone actually had a reliability problem with Crampon Mags? I see people saying they're not reliable but with little real world experiences. I admittedly didn't read all 40 pages of this thread though. I'm 240lbs without gear and have had nothing but great experience with them. There's very, very little play in them but some play is normal anyway and they're supposed to be tightened periodically. I would like to know if "problems" have gone beyond the little bit of play that can be tightened out.
    I had the exact same issue, rode the saints once and hated it. Always rolling under my foot. Bought a used set of Mags and still going strong over a year later, no rebuild.

    Happy enough with the performance and durability that I bought a second pair at retail for my second bike.
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  26. #1926
    mtbr member
    Reputation: inonjoey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    I had the exact same issue, rode the saints once and hated it. Always rolling under my foot. Bought a used set of Mags and still going strong over a year later, no rebuild.

    Happy enough with the performance and durability that I bought a second pair at retail for my second bike.
    And I had the exact same experience with Saints as well. If I'd started out on Saints, I'm sure I would have adapted and been fine, but I started riding flats again on Point1's. The Point1's were great for a year, but by that point the bearings were completely destroyed.

    I made the switch to Crampon Ultimates about 9 months ago. I bent one axle in the first month, but Canfield got me rolling again in less than a week and threw in a rebuild kit when they sent the pedal back. No other problems and I love the convex design. Won't be switching out the Crampons any time soon.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    "So you think it's the hat?... A lot of people hate this hat. It angers a lot of people, just the sight of it." - Uncle Buck

  27. #1927
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by metrotuned View Post
    @BuickGN I'd like to hear your review of them after at least 500 miles of use or a season of use in relation to the bearing/bushing life of the Crampon Mags. Since they're made by HT, many of the feedback stories are destroyed pedals from the bearings and bushings. I cannot tell you how disappointing and time consuming it is to deal with bearing issues on pedals. There needs to be a balance with function/form and durability/weight. A smart man once said here on MTBR that the contact points are not the places where you want to save weight. The pedals for sure are up there along with a proper fitting saddle!

    @J. Random Psycho the nylon pedal post was for you. Nylon is intriguing. There seems to be no weight penalty versus aluminum and the replaceable aspect makes a lot of sense considering the 1/3 or even 1/4 cost of aluminum comparables. The entry cost is what appeals and if manufacturers can use quality end caps (not plastic BMX-esque), it actually makes choosing nylon pedals possible.

    I have 500+ miles on three pairs of the Crampons. 2 magnesium versions and one aluminum. I've tried others including the ones that came on my Fatboy, beenies I think they are. There's a difference, thick pedals roll on me, maybe not on others, but for me they do. The thinner the better I say as long as they last. If there are bad reports about the Crampons I'd guess it's due to the fact that many folks simply don't maintain their bikes. There's an outer Nylok nut that you have to make sure is secured. Also, in 10 minutes I can disassemble and repack with grease. That's it, I've had zero problems and if you do the support is fantastic. The one issue I had was my fault, cross threading one of them. I talked to them directly on the phone and they sent me a whole new assembly and wouldn't charge me. They've got my business until I blow one up or they won't support them. I'm about 195 with pack.

  28. #1928
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    148
    straitline or Sun-Ringle ZuZus

  29. #1929
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    264
    I've got to say, the guys at Spank are super chill and sent me new bearings after emailing them about a 3 year old pedal that seized on my Canfield One FR/AM bike. They called me back within a few days even though they were at Crankworx that week. That's customer service beyond normal and I like supporting what appears to be a small company.
    My DMR vaults on my SB95 are really good so far. Pretty light (Mg version), and get a ton of trail miles on them (around 3000mi or so). 2 years w/ just one maintenance service is all I have done to date and they are still super smooth.

    I think its time for Shimano to redesign the Saints. Lighter (<300g) and thinner would be nice, and they would definitely be my next choice for my DH bike considering the price they are now.. Everyone I know has zero issues with them. If not, I'll just throw some Spanks on there as well. My Deity's I have on there now are fine, but they are pretty thick and I do not know their weight.

  30. #1930
    mtbr member
    Reputation: inonjoey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by TallBoy51 View Post
    I have 500+ miles on three pairs of the Crampons. 2 magnesium versions and one aluminum. I've tried others including the ones that came on my Fatboy, beenies I think they are. There's a difference, thick pedals roll on me, maybe not on others, but for me they do. The thinner the better I say as long as they last. If there are bad reports about the Crampons I'd guess it's due to the fact that many folks simply don't maintain their bikes. There's an outer Nylok nut that you have to make sure is secured. Also, in 10 minutes I can disassemble and repack with grease. That's it, I've had zero problems and if you do the support is fantastic. The one issue I had was my fault, cross threading one of them. I talked to them directly on the phone and they sent me a whole new assembly and wouldn't charge me. They've got my business until I blow one up or they won't support them. I'm about 195 with pack.
    I should have added that my Crampons have 1,000 miles on them. Experience is quite similar to you. Excellent, durable pedals when you maintain them (which is stupid quick and easy).

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    "So you think it's the hat?... A lot of people hate this hat. It angers a lot of people, just the sight of it." - Uncle Buck

  31. #1931
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    6
    Im new to the game, bought a used Blur LT this year and it desperately needs a new set of pedals. Id like something relatively thin and wide, reliable and under $80-100. Ive been looking at the VP Vice but some reviewers have commented in the convex shape being uncomfortable and Im susceptible to hot hot spots. A few other reviewers complained of poor bearing quality and small size, even though the specs say they're the same size as Crampons. Any recommendations or experience with the VPs? Thanks.

  32. #1932
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    457
    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    If you want durable pedals then avoid crank brothers and canfeild.
    Can folk speak to this relative to the Canfield Crampon Classic? I've heard elsewhere that they are quite durable, so this blanket statement doesn't quite wash. That said, I ride granite rock gardens on a bike with a super low BB, so heavy pedal strikes are going to happen, no matter how well I ratchet, and when they do I'm going to continue to bash through. I need a flat that can hold-up to regular abuse. I've never been much for mud riding, although the most direct line between my two favorite parts of the local area is through a stream, so they will get wet. Are any of the low-profile $100ish flat pedals a good match for this, or should I save my money and get some Saints?

    (As an aside, I've always hated Crank Brothers, despite the good will when they sold my race team the original egg beaters for $25 a pair as a promotional effort when they first came out. They lasted one day on my bike before I went back to my 747s. They were entirely too flimsy for my preferred non-race-day terrain. Thankfully, there were plenty of teammates who were more than happy to get me my $25 back. :-) Those 747s are still going strong 15 years later, and are as easy to get out of as flats, although I do need to keep the springs fully cranked down at this point, so they aren't going to last that much longer.)

  33. #1933
    mtbr member
    Reputation: phoenixnr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    537
    Quote Originally Posted by metrotuned View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	metrotuned-MTBR-nylon-flat-platform-pedals.jpg 
Views:	229 
Size:	66.6 KB 
ID:	1023108

    I've also been eyeing the sealed bearing plastic / nylon pedals on the market, mostly because they're under $30 shipped and offer functionality equal to many of the $100 aluminum bodied counterparts with the same internals - namely sealed bearings. BMX riders use loose ball nylon pedals and they destroy their bikes frequently. ...the ability of going through 3 pedal sets for each 1 high end pedal set.

    Maybe not a larger "VP Harrier" 120mmx110mm and 12mm thick size, which I find valuable, but typically around 100mmx100mm and 16mm thick and between 250-350g in weight depending on molded pins vs replaceable alloy pins.

    Here are a number of pedals I've been researching:

    Fyxation Mesa
    Nukeproof Electron Evo
    Monster Redline
    VP Push
    Premium Slim PC
    Post back what you decide on and experience. I have a generic set of nylons with replaceable pins that have a full season on them. Light, durable and cheap.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  34. #1934
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    264
    Quote Originally Posted by phoenixnr View Post
    Post back what you decide on and experience. I have a generic set of nylons with replaceable pins that have a full season on them. Light, durable and cheap.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    I've had the fyxation and others in that design. I slipped alot with them, but then got longer allen pins from home depot and they were much better after that. I bent the axles on two sets rather easily striking rocks and moved on to better pedals. (Spank spike, dmr vault, diety, and HT ae03)
    Last edited by guitarjohn21; 11-08-2015 at 07:19 PM. Reason: Misspelling

  35. #1935
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,660
    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    If you want durable pedals then avoid crank brothers and canfeild.
    Don't see any threads complaining about the durability of Canfields. I've had my first pair for over a year and they've been fine. They were even purchased used. Got about 6 months on my second pair.
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  36. #1936
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    956
    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider View Post
    Got a set of the Scarabs to go on my Uzzi while the Contacts get shifted to the Session. Thought I'd share some pics with a size comparison against the Contact pedal.




    So I wanted to follow up on my experience here.

    I've since sold the bike that had the Scarabs and I was all too happy to get rid of them. I just don't think my size 10 shoes were big enough for them. I was never fully confident on them as compared to the Contacts which are smaller. I felt like there were some vague spots on the front outer section that I didn't like. If you look at the 2nd picture you can see that the outer pins are rear biased on the Scarabs where the contacts are front biased. I just couldn't get along with how that felt.

    On my new (to me) bike, I went with another set of the Contacts and am much happier and confident in them.

    I will say that I pedaled around aparking lot on the Raceface Atlas pedals and those felt super grippy. I wouldn't mind taking a stab at those, but the Contacts are just fine.

    -joel

  37. #1937
    I miss f88
    Reputation: laxman2001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,468
    Quote Originally Posted by phride View Post
    Can folk speak to this relative to the Canfield Crampon Classic? I've heard elsewhere that they are quite durable, so this blanket statement doesn't quite wash. That said, I ride granite rock gardens on a bike with a super low BB, so heavy pedal strikes are going to happen, no matter how well I ratchet, and when they do I'm going to continue to bash through. I need a flat that can hold-up to regular abuse. I've never been much for mud riding, although the most direct line between my two favorite parts of the local area is through a stream, so they will get wet. Are any of the low-profile $100ish flat pedals a good match for this, or should I save my money and get some Saints?

    (As an aside, I've always hated Crank Brothers, despite the good will when they sold my race team the original egg beaters for $25 a pair as a promotional effort when they first came out. They lasted one day on my bike before I went back to my 747s. They were entirely too flimsy for my preferred non-race-day terrain. Thankfully, there were plenty of teammates who were more than happy to get me my $25 back. :-) Those 747s are still going strong 15 years later, and are as easy to get out of as flats, although I do need to keep the springs fully cranked down at this point, so they aren't going to last that much longer.)
    I have a set of the originals. No reliability issues with them whatsoever. That said, because of the exposed axle they can squeak when pedaling, and Canfield described them to me as more DH oriented while the ultimate was better for AM. But they've survived years of abuse from me and others, on multiple bikes of various stripes, and been very solid.
    WHEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!
    ------__o
    ----_`\<,_
    ---(_)/ (_)

  38. #1938
    mtbr member
    Reputation: D Bone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    661
    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider View Post
    I will say that I pedaled around aparking lot on the Raceface Atlas pedals and those felt super grippy. I wouldn't mind taking a stab at those
    I had them and they were the grippiest pedal that I have ever tried..... However, they developed massive amounts of side-to-side play, and the way they are designed, there is nothing you can do about it. Look at some of the reviews on CRC.

    The whole pedal body is held onto the spindle by a little 2.5mm screw and when the bearings/seals wear, there is slop in the pedal and you can't tighten the little screw any more because it's already bottomed out.

    Some of the guys on CRC claimed they ground away a small amount of material on the small end of the spindle and that allowed the little screw to tighten further and remove the play............ Sounds like fun eh?

  39. #1939
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    517
    There are a lot of nice pedals, and I could probably find half a dozen I would love to have on my bike.

    I got these Wellgo MG-FIVE - magnesium, thin, grippy, and large. Only $40. I considered pedals up to $150 but these are plenty nice.




  40. #1940
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    457
    I picked-up some Canfield Crampon Classics for $100 last week, and all i can say is "Wow!" I've ridden various cheaper, thicker flats over the years but have always gone back to my 747 SPDs, whether because I was being dropped by the spandex brigade or because I didn't feel well enough connected to the bike. Now, after a couple days on the Crampons, I can't see myself going back. The power transfer over most of the pedal stroke is as good as the SPDs; I stay glued to the pedals over the rough stuff; and pedaling just feels smoother with the low profile design. I had heard the hype but really hadn't expected to notice a difference pedaling. I simply got a well reviewed flat that came at a decent price that I figured might help limit pedal strikes on my 6Fattie. I've been riding them with Merrell Footgloves, and the combination of the ultra low profile shoe and the ultra low profile pedal has me more comfortable on the bike than I've ever been. I doubt the Footgloves will hold-up over the long-term in the rock gardens and certainly don't offer my feet the best protection, but wow that setup feels good turning the cranks. I'm no Strava warrior, so I won't be able to objectively evaluate pedaling efficiency between this setup and the SPDs, but I do know that pedaling feels more natural and by eliminating the use of the pedal upstroke, I'll be doing my back a world of good. Now to see how well they hold-up to abuse.

  41. #1941
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,320
    These Black Mambas are what looks like new plastic body/metal pin pedals from Funn, a value oriented brand.

    Surely they are going to cost less than Race Face Chester, also a new model of plastic body/metal pin pedals. Though Chesters are offered in lots of nice colors.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  42. #1942
    Brand Ambassador Moderator
    Reputation: JCWages's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    2,106
    I swapped out my girlfriend's Wellgo b219s for a set of these bad mofos today. HT Components AE03.

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-2015-11-18-19.09.18.jpg

    She said they held her Five Tens in a death grip. After our ride I took her bike for a spin around our complex and holy cow they grip! I'm still running the Wellgo B252-mg and the grip difference was mind blowing. Sure the HT AE03 pedals are more expensive but the quality craftsmanship and grip is worth it. I'm going to get a set of my own now.

    .:HT COMPONENTS:.

  43. #1943
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Junersun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    892
    My experience on platforms are straitline defacto, vp harrier, crank brother 5050 and now deity bladerunner.

    Deity have been the best pair I've owned. Had I known the tmac were coming out I prob would have opted for that but I'm loving mine. I wear size 10 shoes and have a wide foot. Plenty of real estate with my deity

    '16 Banshee Rune
    '15 Large NS Essentric ALU
    '15 Large Ibis Mojo HD3
    '14 Large Knolly Endorphin
    '08 Jamis Dakar Expert

  44. #1944
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metrotuned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,757
    Feedback on the DMR V12 Mag's - the black ones with the gold axle caps. The platforms are a bit smaller than I'd like (size 12). The value is there, a solid choice and the best value for the price point available today (<$60) ... the pin placement is designed proper, the platform sheds dirt, and the weight is lower than expected (magnesium not alloy construction). However, they might be too simple, similar to the VP AIM Pedals which I read were designed by dirt jump downhiller Sam Reynolds. The two pedals are similar to each other - like a BMX pedal (Ruben Fly Pedals).

    Heads up right now there were 4 auctions for Syncros Mental pedals on ebay for sale. From the OG stainless 800g versions with the replaceable pins to the next generation to the FR thins. I swooped up a set of the FRs (400g thinner most recent versions). I like the platform size and shape, they are grippier and more confident inspiring. Plus I like to lift up and shift my foot depending on the terrain, or when certain muscle groups are fatigued. Plus, the end result ditching SPD clipless in favor of platforms - riding is simply more fun. (no need to have special carbon sole shoes - no need for special "riding gear")
    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  45. #1945
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OFFcourse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by F8L View Post
    I swapped out my girlfriend's Wellgo b219s for a set of these bad mofos today. HT Components AE03.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2015-11-18 19.09.18.jpg 
Views:	780 
Size:	366.8 KB 
ID:	1029857

    She said they held her Five Tens in a death grip. After our ride I took her bike for a spin around our complex and holy cow they grip! I'm still running the Wellgo B252-mg and the grip difference was mind blowing. Sure the HT AE03 pedals are more expensive but the quality craftsmanship and grip is worth it. I'm going to get a set of my own now.

    .:HT COMPONENTS:.
    They grip awesome but those bearings last 8 weeks in muck.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

  46. #1946
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    16

    acros pedal

    anyone using very wide acros aflat xl pedal?

    pros: grippy, comfy, durable bearing (the best grip, comfy, bearing than other pedals i've ever ride - wellgo b-144, cb 5050, funn big foot)
    cons: pedal strikes sometimes (more often than other pedals i've ever ride)

    other two variants from acros: aflat sl and aflat md

  47. #1947
    Ride Everything
    Reputation: GRAVELBIKE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,733
    Currently alternating between Spank Oozy, HT AE05, and VP 001 pedals. Too soon to comment on durability, but the Spank and HT stick like velcro to my 5.10 Freerider Contact shoes.
    GRAVELBIKE.COM - ride everything

  48. #1948
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metrotuned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,757

    Good job! DMR Magnesium V12 User Review

    Happy New Year y'all. Just a few months away from 6 years after authoring the Platform Pedal Shootout. 820,000+ views.

    After going through 65 pages and all the feedback you've provided, what is the best pedal? It's subjective to you.

    New year update on my daily commuter setup - DMR V12 magnesium which is identified by the gold end cap and customized with Mental style steel pins instead of the factory silver allen key grub screws which are lighter and function OK, but I think they cheapen the pedal. People, these pedals are a reasonable $60!

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-metrotuned-dmr-pedals-modified.jpg  

    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  49. #1949
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    517
    I hit a rock and bent the spindle of my Wellgo MG-5.

    I took the spindle out, put it in a vise, and hammered it straighter. I am going to switch to SPD, but I got the Wellgo working well enough that I can use them if I want and they feel normal.

    Not sure if I should be unhappy that they bent, or happy that they took the damage instead of my crank arm.

  50. #1950
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    4,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    The Vault Mags I have are nice but I just bent the drive side spindle. I've emailed DMR to see if I can buy a replacement. We'll see how it goes.

    The Vaults are very concave which holds your foot in very well. Perfect for chunky DH, but feels too soft underfoot for trail riding when pedaling. Foot feels odd on pedal if not placed just right.



    The RF Atlas is nice. Very comfortable feel on the foot almost no matter how the foot lands on them. Less concave which is better for trail riding where you have to mash the pedals. Gives you a firmer, less mushy feel when hammering. Don't grip your feet quite as well as the Vaults which might be bad on big, fast hits, but makes re-positioning easier. Lower profile as well, so less likely to clip rocks. One spindle was a bit too long and the end bolt that held the bearing on bottomed out before tightening down, allowing for some lateral play. A few strokes with a file on the end of the spindle and all is good. This pedal spins just a bit too freely, or at least one of the two pedals do. I like a pedal that has a slight resistance to spin.

    Follow up...

    Was easily able to get a cheap replacement axel for the dmr, but turned out to not be a bent axel. It was the cranks thread insert that broke free and twisted.

    Anyway, both dmr and RF pedals are going strong.

    The rf pedals don't fit on cranks if you've got crank boots on.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •