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  1. #1851
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    Quote Originally Posted by tualmbr View Post
    Now im lost all over again, does this mean I should spend the $130 on platform or get some cheap platform and spend the real $ on clipless.

    Oh wait, this is the platform pedal thread, I guess im not allowed to ask that question.
    Not sure why the attitude with the last line. You asked and I gave an answer. It will help you decide.
    I grew up on BMX bikes and used to be able bunny hop really well. After years on clipless when I went back to flat I'm having to relearn skills I lost because clipless let's you get lazy.
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  2. #1852
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    I grew up on BMX bikes and used to be able bunny hop really well.
    I wish I could grow up on BMX too, but it looked like they weren't letting anything that has 3 letters and ends with X (e. g. SEX, BMX) into USSR. The attitude I've been taught towards bikes of that era was "dismount before every curb, up and down". The very idea of bunny hopping anything would have obliterated the sanity of a typical cyclist of that era, and this lives on even to this day: many claim that if you're not riding distances and instead like to take a bike into air, you're not really riding a bike, you're just doing goddamn stunts and that's not what bicycles are made for!

    Rant over. Guess I had to vent.
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  3. #1853
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    One BIG problem with Specialized Boomslang pedals, replacement axles are not available. I have a pair with a slightly bent axle & Specialized told me they do not sell axles separately & have no plans to. When asked what should I do now they said buy a new pair!!! same response the bike store had. I might understand if these were $50 pedals but a high end 180 buck DH pedal should be completely rebuild-able. I feel completely ripped off. This is the last product I buy from BIG S.

  4. #1854
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toddmac1 View Post
    One BIG problem with Specialized Boomslang pedals, replacement axles are not available. I have a pair with a slightly bent axle & Specialized told me they do not sell axles separately & have no plans to. When asked what should I do now they said buy a new pair!!! same response the bike store had. I might understand if these were $50 pedals but a high end 180 buck DH pedal should be completely rebuild-able. I feel completely ripped off. This is the last product I buy from BIG S.
    What a stupid, arrogant approach from Specialized. Didn't have plans to buy those pedals, and now I never will!

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  5. #1855
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    Quote Originally Posted by inonjoey View Post
    What a stupid, arrogant approach from Specialized. Didn't have plans to buy those pedals, and now I never will!

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    OMG, that's just the tip of the iceberg with them. I would never purchase anything from them!

  6. #1856
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    Quote Originally Posted by inonjoey View Post
    What a stupid, arrogant approach from Specialized. Didn't have plans to buy those pedals, and now I never will!

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    LOL what else would expect from them.
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  7. #1857
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    Specialized; Over hyped, over priced.

  8. #1858
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    Wow, $180 and no spare parts... That's ridiculous.

  9. #1859
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    I posted it in the big S section. No one has replied. Those S people don't like anyone shaking things up. Maybe you guys should go over there and post.

  10. #1860
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    I ended up going with the Deity compound.

    In all honesty, the Deity Bladerunner had the smoothest, nicest design out of everything the LBS had on display - and they even had some high end $250 platforms on display - the Bladerunner had a better color match to what I wanted - but how could I justify an extra $120 over the Compound ?

  11. #1861
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    ^^Compounds are good pedals - I've run them for the past few years. On really chunky/rocky trails tho you get what you pay for; the pins bust out of the composite making for impossible replacement unless you can epoxy them back together. The spindles are weaksauce compared to the Decoys or Bladerunners - bent a couple over the last year. They're basically disposable pedals that work well until you beat on them. So... the extra $120 is probably worth it for those that consistently ride more technical terrain.

    Have FUN!

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  12. #1862
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    I figure my right knee will blow up before any pedal blows up - even a plastic pedal! Now I just need a good source for cheap clip less shoes, haven't been able to find anything in a U.S. 10.5 for less than 90$

  13. #1863
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    I tried doing some searches, but does anyone have the width/length of the platform for the Shimano Saint pedals? I ordered a set of Chromag Scarabs to go with my new bicycle but wanted to compare them to the Saints that I have in my current bike in terms of size. Sometimes it feels like the Saints are a bit small and I'm hoping that the Scarabs will be a better pedal at about twice the price...

  14. #1864
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    So I have a set of the highly touted Crampon pedals from Canfield and a set of the Nashbar flats (made by HT) and I prefer the latter because I have such big feet, the canfields are nice, but the spot where the bearing is on the pedal pushes my feet to the outside. It should be noted that I wear a size 14 Freerider VXI. . .so most people probably wouldn't notice.
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
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  15. #1865
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    Quote Originally Posted by roastpuff View Post
    I tried doing some searches, but does anyone have the width/length of the platform for the Shimano Saint pedals? I ordered a set of Chromag Scarabs to go with my new bicycle but wanted to compare them to the Saints that I have in my current bike in terms of size. Sometimes it feels like the Saints are a bit small and I'm hoping that the Scarabs will be a better pedal at about twice the price...
    This should help: https://youtu.be/ymPPMUY5oRA

  16. #1866
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    One thing I didn't see addressed in the noob talk walk shoe choice. In my opinion, if you are "considering" flats and wanna see if you like them before you drop $150 on pedals I'd say you can skimp a little on the pedal but DO NOT skimp on the shoes!

    When I switched I bought a set of Diety knock offs from ebay: $60. And a pair of cheap Fox skate/riding shoes: $50.

    Performance was alright but everyone kept telling me get some 510s. I refused to believe that only one company on the planet could make sticky shoes so I held out 'cause I didn't wanna drop $100+ on a pair of shoes.

    When I did finally get the 510s the difference was night and day. I've also heard good things about the Tevas and even Sombrio but you can't go wrong with 510s. After the shoes opened my eyes I dropped the extra cash on a set of Spank Spikes. I see no advantage to SPDs anymore. Not when you like riding FUN trails with some tech.

    Don't skimp on shoes!

  17. #1867
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    This ^^^

  18. #1868
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    One thing I didn't see addressed in the noob talk walk shoe choice. In my opinion, if you are "considering" flats and wanna see if you like them before you drop $150 on pedals I'd say you can skimp a little on the pedal but DO NOT skimp on the shoes!

    When I switched I bought a set of Diety knock offs from ebay: $60. And a pair of cheap Fox skate/riding shoes: $50.

    Performance was alright but everyone kept telling me get some 510s. I refused to believe that only one company on the planet could make sticky shoes so I held out 'cause I didn't wanna drop $100+ on a pair of shoes.

    When I did finally get the 510s the difference was night and day. I've also heard good things about the Tevas and even Sombrio but you can't go wrong with 510s. After the shoes opened my eyes I dropped the extra cash on a set of Spank Spikes. I see no advantage to SPDs anymore. Not when you like riding FUN trails with some tech.

    Don't skimp on shoes!
    It's funny when people with SPDs have no clue how good a proper pair of flats with proper shoes can be because they never tried. After some Walmart pedals most of my friends jumped straight to SPDs and they cannot understand how can I beat them on uphills and my feet stay on the pedals on downhills. It's against everything they were told about pedals. I am supposed to be much slower on uphills because SPDs are more efficient and my feet should bounce off the pedals on the rough downs.
    I am running 510 Freeriders for three years, Saints and Spikes on my two bikes.
    First I loved the Spikes because they are very thin and their Q factor is much narrower than the Saints' while their platform is bigger but I have serious reliability issues with them. They cost more than double then Saints but they don't last half as long before you need to rebuild it. The seals are very bad and the ball bearings seized after six months and the plastic bushings have play too. The rebuild kit costs as much as a new pair of Saints - but after two years the Saints are still running smoothly. I refused to fork out that much money for the rebuild kit so I cleaned and greased the bearings and they are spinning freely but not smoothly - and I repeat this once a month.
    Couple of weeks ago my friend bought DMR Vaults and I fell in love with those pedals and I ordered them. Bigger and concave platform I felt like I am standing in the pedals not on the top of them. As soon as they arrive I'm going to sell the Spikes.

    Check the bearings regularly in the Spikes then you should be OK if otherwise you like them.

  19. #1869
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    Then again - I wore my chaco sandals with my new Deity Compound pedals. I couldn't get my foot to move on that pedal unless I physically raised it off the pins.

    There are thousands of shoes and hundreds of pedals - some fit each other just right - some don't. The only thing that makes 510's special is they have a flat bottom and soft rubber.

  20. #1870
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    Quote Originally Posted by 950sm07 View Post
    First I loved the Spikes because they are very thin and their Q factor is much narrower than the Saints' while their platform is bigger but I have serious reliability issues with them. They cost more than double then Saints but they don't last half as long before you need to rebuild it. The seals are very bad and the ball bearings seized after six months and the plastic bushings have play too. The rebuild kit costs as much as a new pair of Saints - but after two years the Saints are still running smoothly. I refused to fork out that much money for the rebuild kit so I cleaned and greased the bearings and they are spinning freely but not smoothly - and I repeat this once a month.
    Been beating the living sh|t outta my Spikes on the AZ rocks for over 3 years and have replaced 3, maybe 4 pins. The right pedal has a tiny bit of play in that you can pull it away from the crank less than 1/16".

    So, no complaints from me but the Saints are pretty solid and cheaper...

  21. #1871
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    Quote Originally Posted by tualmbr View Post
    The only thing that makes 510's special is they have a flat bottom and soft rubber.
    They have a flat bottom, but more importantly its the way the small lugs and grooves in the sole make them likely to grab a pin and hold it whenever you put your foot down. This makes them suck in the mud however.

    Its not that the rubber is soft, its that it it sticky. Probably the best high friction rubber out there.

    Also, the soles are stiff as they need to be for bike shoes for efficient pedaling.

  22. #1872
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    Been beating the living sh|t outta my Spikes on the AZ rocks for over 3 years and have replaced 3, maybe 4 pins. The right pedal has a tiny bit of play in that you can pull it away from the crank less than 1/16".

    So, no complaints from me but the Saints are pretty solid and cheaper...
    You had more luck with them and probably not much rain in AZ. Still good pedals I prefer their platform over the Saints.

  23. #1873
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    Just replaced my podium pedals with Diety Blade runner's. Lots of grip, lots of room, pretty thin, bearings are smooth and they do not have the large bearing bulge on the inside that many pedals have which is a plus. Only issue is on my first pedal strike I lost a spike. Hoping these hold up better than my old podiums which were very fragile.

  24. #1874
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    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...

    My first pair of Nukeproof pedals. Got a great deal from chainreaction cycles thought I'd give them a try.

  25. #1875
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    Were they on sale?

  26. #1876
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonezed7 View Post
    Were they on sale?
    Yea I think $59.00 from chain reaction plus shipping.

  27. #1877
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    My 1st set of Kore Rivera Thermo is still going strong meanwhile. Same great points about them: price, weight, kindness to shoes and shins/calves. I don't have to wear knee-shin guards any more. Bought 2 more sets from CRC.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  28. #1878
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    I got nukeproof neutron pedals they are great but one leaks grease from the seal and they are less then a year old.Kinda pissed about that.
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  29. #1879
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiantBren View Post
    I got nukeproof neutron pedals they are great but one leaks grease from the seal and they are less then a year old.Kinda pissed about that.
    There's not much complexity in that area. Behind the seal there's a bore and a pressed-in bushing sits there. Axle goes through it and is greased. The pedal may just need an overhaul (as in disassemble, clean, grease, assemble). Worst case: bushing replacement, though a year sounds like too early for that. Spare bushings for Nukeproof pedals are available at CRC.

    PS.
    Well, for completeness: there's also the "worstest" case that involves eroded/rusted bearing surface on the axle itself. But it's even less probable than a bushing that needs replacement after only a year of riding.

    Compare pedal bodies for play. If the leaky one has noticeably more play than the other one, that's reason to start worrying and looking what's inside.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  30. #1880
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    New guy to this forum here getting back into mtb... been away from mountain biking for a long time so this thread has been very informative. Didn't see any mention on Eastern pedals... I used a set on my BMX bike for a while and they are super grippy! on a quick search just now i saw some reviews where people say they grip too much haha which i guess for BMXers letting go of pedals to do tricks it makes sense... just another one to add to the mix . not really a light pedal (mine was AL) but i believe they now have a magnesium and plastic version as well. They're thicker than some of these low profile pedals but have the allen set screws throughout the platform which grip a bunch
    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-easternmetalpedals.jpg
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  31. #1881
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    Oh and forgot to mention the Eastern pedal ranges between 35-70 bucks depending on the material and whether its sealed or not
    "Life is like riding a bicycle, to keep your balance you must keep moving" ~Einstein


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  32. #1882
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    Why, that's run of the mill "old school" flat pedals. I wouldn't object to the excess thickness, it means more reliable bearings and/or a thicker axle after all. But set screw pins are hard to remove when damaged, and wrench flats go all the way to the axle face that butts against the crank, making pedal washers a necessity.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  33. #1883
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Why, that's run of the mill "old school" flat pedals. I wouldn't object to the excess thickness, it means more reliable bearings and/or a thicker axle after all. But set screw pins are hard to remove when damaged, and wrench flats go all the way to the axle face that butts against the crank, making pedal washers a necessity.
    well like i said I've been away form mountain biking for a while lol and TONS have changed since then. this was a pedal i liked on my BMX bike that gripped a bunch on the trails so figured i'd share...
    "Life is like riding a bicycle, to keep your balance you must keep moving" ~Einstein


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  34. #1884
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    Pedals that cost a fraction of $100 (and may last longer than some $100+ models) are definitely worth mentioning in this thread.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  35. #1885
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Pedals that cost a fraction of $100 (and may last longer than some $100+ models) are definitely worth mentioning in this thread.
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    $45 from Nashbar and made by HT. . . really good, big pedals.
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  36. #1886
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    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
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    $45 from Nashbar and made by HT. . . really good, big pedals.
    were these the same ones mentioned a couple times previously in this thread? they look pretty nice and simple
    "Life is like riding a bicycle, to keep your balance you must keep moving" ~Einstein


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  37. #1887
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    Wellgo Ti $80 and 292g

  38. #1888
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    I've got Canfield Crampon Mags on my Stache 5, love em'. Btw, size 12 here on old skateboard shoes (Vision, or something very similar).

  39. #1889
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    I have both the podiums and the Crampons. Both are great pedals but I have to give the nod to the Podiums. The bearing hold up better.

  40. #1890
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rom3n View Post
    Just replaced my podium pedals with Diety Blade runner's. Lots of grip, lots of room, pretty thin, bearings are smooth and they do not have the large bearing bulge on the inside that many pedals have which is a plus. Only issue is on my first pedal strike I lost a spike. Hoping these hold up better than my old podiums which were very fragile.
    Well after a couple weeks of riding one of the pedals now has an excessive amount of play in it's bearing. Back to my old Podiums..

  41. #1891
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Bone View Post
    So, I waited until I had 6 rides on the Contacts before writing my thoughts. First and foremost, they grip better than the Spikes and it's not even close. With the Spikes, I simply had to "twist my ankle" to get my 5-10 Free Riders to reposition on the pedal, even if I were standing........... Not so with the Contacts. I have to basically take off all of my weight and "dab my ankle" to reposition. The first few rides I struggled a bit to reposition, but I have now gotten the hang of it and I don't have to think about it as much, and I'm betting by the end of the month, I won't give it another thought.

    The Contacts match, and actually exceed the Spikes in width (from crank arm face to end of pedal) but are about 7mm less in length (from front wheel to back wheel) and that also took a few rides to get used to, but like with the grip, I am now pretty much used to it. Also, I thought I was going to feel the 4mm extra thickness of the Contacts compared to the Spikes (16mm vs 12mm), but I never have.

    Overall, I am extremely happy with the Contacts. With their tenacious grip, I can actually pull back on the pedals while climbing, and when descending or simply hammering through a rough section, my feet just don't move at all.

    I do think Chromag is hurting themselves by marketing the Contact as a "dirt jumping pedal" because even though they say the Contact's "bring your feet closer to the crank, for better control while doing tricks", they are in fact wider than the Spikes by a few mm's, and they even stand off of the crank arm face (where pedal platform begins) more than the Spikes do (see last pic in my above post), so your foot can actually rest naturally on the Contact even a little further away from the crank arm face than with the Spike, which is considered a "trail pedal".

    I will update any durability issues if they arise............ Figure no news is good news.
    How are you liking them so far? I'm really surprised you like them over the spikes when you didn't like the scarabs better than the spikes.

    I was going to buy another set of Torques, but I came across a set of Contacts used. They are in great shape and cheaper than what I was going to spend on the Torques. I'm going to throw them on my DH bike tomorrow and hopefully get a ride on them on Sunday afternoon.

  42. #1892
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rom3n View Post
    Well after a couple weeks of riding one of the pedals now has an excessive amount of play in it's bearing. Back to my old Podiums..
    Thanks for the report. That's sad. They were on my list of options of thin pedals with pedal wrench flats.

    Hope the Origin8 ultim8 I got don't blow up, like they did on "spillbill" who posted a review on Singletracks. Will have to open up to non-thin pedals if the origin8 pedals don't work out.

  43. #1893
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    for $20, these look nice

    • Cromo axle
    • Dual DU bush system
    • 327g per pair
    • Full length off road pins

    Available in a range of vivid colours
    Non-serviceable design


  44. #1894
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    I'd try these. I have mentioned them earlier in this thread; to recap: use pedal washers because of how axle face is shaped.

    Plastic pin/plastic body pedals are IMHO great choice for those who need flat pedals and don't experience frequent rock strikes.

    Straitline guys, if you're reading: I still think that your axles and bushings system combined with replaceable plastic bodies would totally rock (no pun intended).
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  45. #1895
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    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...

    anyone have these, they look sick...

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-imageuploadedbytapatalk1441470395.349800.jpg

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-imageuploadedbytapatalk1441470021.531990.jpg

  46. #1896
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Thanks for the report. That's sad. They were on my list of options of thin pedals with pedal wrench flats.

    Hope the Origin8 ultim8 I got don't blow up, like they did on "spillbill" who posted a review on Singletracks. Will have to open up to non-thin pedals if the origin8 pedals don't work out.
    I might have got a fluke pair but it was pretty disappointing. I have a new set of Crampon Ultimate's im going to give a try as my Podiums are getting long in the tooth.

  47. #1897
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    I'm on Atlas' little brother pedals now, can't remember the name offhand. Ordered the Crampon Mags yesterday mostly because I just wanted to try something new but also because I have rolled the pedals a few times and it's always on the steepest uphill where there's no way to restart once you stop. I added a little weight in the front with a more aggressive tire so I got a 2016 Fit 4 damper to drop on my 2014 EVO fork which saves 1/4 lb. The pedals should save another 1/8lb hopefully. I honestly can't wait to get these pedals in. I think I'm more excited about the pedals than the damper.

    I have size 13 wide feet and these pedals are a good bit wider than what I have. Hopefully they fit better, they almost have to. I tried my friends Spikes and love them but I don't want to get the same thing he's got.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  48. #1898
    Keep on Rockin...
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    The Vault Mags I have are nice but I just bent the drive side spindle. I've emailed DMR to see if I can buy a replacement. We'll see how it goes.

    The Vaults are very concave which holds your foot in very well. Perfect for chunky DH, but feels too soft underfoot for trail riding when pedaling. Foot feels odd on pedal if not placed just right.



    The RF Atlas is nice. Very comfortable feel on the foot almost no matter how the foot lands on them. Less concave which is better for trail riding where you have to mash the pedals. Gives you a firmer, less mushy feel when hammering. Don't grip your feet quite as well as the Vaults which might be bad on big, fast hits, but makes re-positioning easier. Lower profile as well, so less likely to clip rocks. One spindle was a bit too long and the end bolt that held the bearing on bottomed out before tightening down, allowing for some lateral play. A few strokes with a file on the end of the spindle and all is good. This pedal spins just a bit too freely, or at least one of the two pedals do. I like a pedal that has a slight resistance to spin.

  49. #1899
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    Got a set of the Scarabs to go on my Uzzi while the Contacts get shifted to the Session. Thought I'd share some pics with a size comparison against the Contact pedal.






    You can see some difference in size of the pedal body. What I don't get is why the spindle is so much shorter. If you look at the Scarabs on Chromag's site, the spindles are longer. They stick out like on the Contacts. I like a wider stance so I prefer to have the longer spindle. I've emailed Chromag about this and I hope they respond with free longer spindles. These pedals are already expensive!


    ^^^what a PITA! You can see the pin on the left has the washer removed. I wish Chromag would ship with the washers removed. Every review I've read the author removes them and I'm not different. The grip is tenacious with the washers removed. I did knock my shin against them when I was moving the bike around. Wasn't much of a gusher, but there was some blood.

    So, I haven't had a ton of time on them yet, but I have had a single run down a flow trail at the local lift serve park. There's a lot of braking bumps and a bunch of jumps throughout the line. These guys were super grippy. I feel like I get a better foot placement on the pedal too. There wasn't much hunting around for the sweet spot of the pedal. I just got on and went. Stopped once mid trail and when I got back on, my foot fell right into the sweet spot. On the Contacts, I do a little adjusting. It was only one run so take that with a grain of salt. I'm hoping to get back on my bike in the next couple days.

    -joel

  50. #1900
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    I got my Crampon Mags in yesterday and all I can say is wow. When I picked up the box I thought it was empty. I went for my first ride and forgot that they were convex vs flat or concave like the masses. One thing I noticed was these pedals just feel more natural than the others. My foot is way more comfortable on them. Traction is great, I couldn't ask for more. One thing I noticed is they work with a wider variety of shoes. I have some Nikes that have a foam section to the sole that grip almost as well as the 510s that I usually wear. I also have some superlight New balance that have never worked well with any pedals. The New balances worked great with the Crampons surprisingly. I could hear the pedals tearing at the rubber but they never moved around. These seem like an all around great pedal. Time will tell in the durability department and even though $200 is a ridiculous price to pay for some flat pedals, I think they're worth it as long as they hold up well. I'm actually a fan of the convex design.

    Combined with the FIT4 damper that also came in yesterday the bike actually feels a little lighter when I pick it up.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

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