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  1. #1351
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Maybe I will like them (grip is suspect), and they should really extend the life of shoe soles.
    Get some skateboard grip tape and stick strips to the pedal body, your feet will thanks you! Plastic pedals become lethal when you get them wet, which is where the grip tape hack comes in.

  2. #1352
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    but wouldn't the pins keep your foot in place?

  3. #1353
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    No idea, I'm yet to test it.. hoping for the doubly concave shape to help with that.

  4. #1354
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider View Post
    but wouldn't the pins keep your foot in place?
    If they're metal pins, then yes to a point, if they're plastic molded pins forget it. I've learned this first hand (or rather, first shin).

  5. #1355
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    A new pair of shoes is cheaper than a trip to the ER.

  6. #1356
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    Well I'm not going to go full on jumping on those pedals right away )
    I'll start with small stuff and see if I can adapt.

  7. #1357
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chimpanzeeoo View Post
    Anyone know of any low price-point platform pedals, without sacrificing too much performance?
    I'm using the specialized p series pedals for 20$ and they have been working great with 5.10's. The grooves in the pedal give extra grip. I've just been using them for chair lift runs and it's still easy to reposition your foot in a pinch if you need to.

  8. #1358
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    Man, who knew that it was possible to make deciding on a pedal so difficult? I needed to pick up two sets of pedals. One for my Transition Bottlerocket and one for my Transition Double. I didn't want to go super cheap, but I also didn't want to spend more than $150 total for both sets (including tax and shipping). So after doing a bunch of digging around between this thread and other searches, I ended up grabbing one of each of these sets:

    Moove Torque (Thru Pin) ($64usd shipped)


    Deity Compound ($51usd shipped)


    I figured the Torque would be similar to the Deity Decoys I had in the past and really liked, but with thru pins instead of grub screws.

    The Compounds seemed to have some good reviews with those that have tried them. I almost ordered the Fyxation pedals I referenced earlier, but I like that the Compounds have a nylon body which, in theory, will be stronger. At first I wasn't keen to the idea of the non-metal body, but with the metal pins, I think it ought to work out ok. My biggest concern is how they'll grip (or not) when its wet/muddy out. I sent mail to Deity asking how the grip would compare to the Decoys. I expected that there would be less grip, however, Eric Davies' email indicated that they're just as grippy and some people have reported them being even more grippy.

    So, I should have both of them in the next week or so (didn't realize the Moove pedals were coming from Ireland to me in Seattle). I'll get a couple rides on them and report back my opinions. I'll be riding them in FiveTen Lion Kings and the previous pedals I've used are the Deity Decoys, some Kona Pedals (not wah wahs or jack****s), and an older Specialized platform.

    edit: also lol and my reading comprehension. The Fyxation Mesa MP is made from Nylon as well.

    -joel

  9. #1359
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    As I see it about plastic pedals, there are only 2 body materials: polycarbonate, which is transparent, and nylon/fiber composite, which is opaque. Fiber filling could be glass, aramid (kevlar) or carbon.

  10. #1360
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    so, I have to say that my initial impression of the deity compound pedals is positive. they are certainly thin and light weight. I also think the dimensions are nice and big too. I thought I saw somewhere its 106mm by 105mm. I'd go measure, but my bike is at my friends house currently.

    I didn't get to try them on a muddy day, but it was still a wet day. I was wearing five ten lion kings. I was on a run called bermsled, which as you can guess, is full of berms to pump in and out of and some pedaling between sets. I didn't slip a pedal once and felt like I was locked in pretty good. I was actually surprised by this. when I first put the pedals on, I definitely didn't feel like I was locked on like the decoys I was comparing to. I felt like I was missing something with only 2 front pins instead of 3. this turned out to be a non-issue as I felt I had all the traction I needed for the trail I was on. I will admit that I would still like to have that third pin. I was riding smooth trail on a Transition Double. I'd be curious to see if traction would feel the same on a rougher trail. I'm also curious how they are in muddy conditions.

    In terms of the body, there wasn't anything about my riding day that said, "hey, you're on nylon pedal bodies". All I noticed was that I was on a nice wide platform. The other thing about the body is that its not concaved at all. I'm not sure why Deity went this route. However, just like only having 2 pins on the front row, this proved to be a non-issue out on the trail.

    So, if I were to make a change or suggestion to Deity, I'd add that 3rd pin in the front row. It looks like there is enough space for it. I'd also make it a concave body. That way you'd feel more like you're "in" the pedal rather than on it. If I were to guess, I'd say that Deity designed the pedal as is to make it easier for the rider to reposition on the pedal. At the same time, if you're more locked into the pedal, why would you need to reposition?

    Unfortunately, I wont be able to get more riding time on them this year. While on the same trail, I broke my collar bone in a crash. I was trying to clear some jumps when things went awry for me. The crash was in no way related to the pedals. It just means that I'm done riding until next spring.

    Hope that helps someone that's researching the Deity Compounds.

    -joel

  11. #1361
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    Ouch. Get well sooner, jojo.

  12. #1362
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    Quote Originally Posted by illnacord View Post
    NWS: I want to see those triangularly small footprint pedals on your mountain bike. Can you take a pic and post? Small pedals are cool if you have a lot of spring in your shoes (like an SPD pedal with a carbon soled cycling shoe), but with a small platform and flexy shoes, you do lose quite a bit of efficiency, not to mention creating a whole lotta' hot points in your foot. You'll know what I mean after riding 50 miles on a track bike with quill style traditional toe clipped pedals.
    What causes the "Hot spots" on your feet? Mine get to burning BAD!
    The older I get, the faster I was.

  13. #1363
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAVAGESAM View Post
    What causes the "Hot spots" on your feet? Mine get to burning BAD!
    Thin flexy soled shoes cause hot spots (ex. skate shoes with vulcanized soles). Try something with a stiffer and thicker sole that spreads the load better to cure the hot spots.
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  14. #1364
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Thin flexy soled shoes cause hot spots (ex. skate shoes with vulcanized soles). Try something with a stiffer and thicker sole that spreads the load better to cure the hot spots.
    Thank you very much. That SHI* is KILLING me. I'm into biking but don't know much. I keep hearing 510's. I'm guessing that's a biking/street shoe?
    The older I get, the faster I was.

  15. #1365
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAVAGESAM View Post
    Thank you very much. That SHI* is KILLING me. I'm into biking but don't know much. I keep hearing 510's. I'm guessing that's a biking/street shoe?
    510s come in different flavors. Some look and feel just like a skate shoe but with super sticky soles. Others are heavier with a mid- or hi-top cut. Whatever flavor they are worth it.

  16. #1366
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Thin flexy soled shoes cause hot spots (ex. skate shoes with vulcanized soles). Try something with a stiffer and thicker sole that spreads the load better to cure the hot spots.
    Quote Originally Posted by SAVAGESAM View Post
    Thank you very much. That SHI* is KILLING me. I'm into biking but don't know much. I keep hearing 510's. I'm guessing that's a biking/street shoe?
    I had the same issue with an old pair of skate shoe I was wearing when I first got flats. I have a pair of 5-10 and the sole feels a lot stiffer. Haven't ridden them yet.
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  17. #1367
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    I highly recommend the 510 Freeriders. I've had Spitfires, Impacts and Freeriders. Impacts are HEAVY duty! Way too much for the average trail rider. Spitfires are pretty good shoes but the uppers aren't very padded and they aren't as durable(the uppers). The Freeriders are serviceable out in public, driving to and from the trail, etc. Sole still has enough flex that you're not clumping around but plenty stiff to stay comfy on the bike. The padded toe box is much appreciated when you whack your foot on things

    There's some killer deals floating around the web on the '13 model 510s. Google is your friend

    My Freeriders fit the same as Adidas...for ME. I wear 9.5 in both.

  18. #1368
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    My wote goes to the Twenty6 Predator Ti Pedal. I did a review btw, check it out:

    All Mountain Next: Review: Twenty6 Predator Ti Pedal


    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-weight.jpg

  19. #1369
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    I've been riding Crampon Ultimates for about 18 months and they finally need some service. So until I get around to it, I switched them for my Predators (steel axle). I remembered that the Predators were a lot grippier than the CUs, but it was still a "wow" experience.
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  20. #1370
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    I'm voting Deity Compounds until they bust in a way that is scary. They're hard to beat at $47.

  21. #1371
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    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-00n0n_17ulw8sjpjz_600x450.jpg

    I just got these Xpedo MX FORCE magnesium pedals over Craigslist ($25, new in box)..470g. Can't find any info on Web, are they any good? It says "components by Wellgo", is it about the same as the Wellgo MG-1?

  22. #1372
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    Well, the body is different shape, the internals are likely the same.

  23. #1373
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Xpedo SPRY XMX24MC Platform Pedals

    Mounted and tested with a comparison of the HT pedal line with the Xpedo SPRY pedals. The review is here.

    ...The current generation of platform mountain bike riders want thinness and lightness. Where does a pedal manufacturer compromise? With most of the latest and greatest pedals in the $150+ range, they’re far from affordable. Cycling legend, Keith Bontrager, once said, “Light, strong, cheap - pick two.” Although Bontrager’s maxim is almost always the case, the Xpedo SPRY pedals aim at giving the flat pedal cyclist all three: light, strong, cheap.


    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-wos-xpedo-spry-platform-pedals-c.jpg
    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  24. #1374
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    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...

    Quote Originally Posted by DFYFZX View Post
    I do NOT advise using magnesium pedals for aggressive trail riding. Since this thread is in the downhill forum, I'm assuming you guys will be beating the snot out of your pedals. Magnesium can only take a few decent hits before pins start getting torn out and pedal bodies start cracking. Stick to a solid aluminum platform and ignore the super lightweight pedals if you plan to beat on them. The Crampons are popular because they're light, thin AND bulletproof
    +1 I had some mag HT's that lasted about five rides until a little piece broke off. Awesome pedals and stupid light, just not durable.

  25. #1375
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    I've been romping black-ops plastic pedals on my AM bike most of the season. Light, grippy, and priced right (50$) they get slick when it's baby**** muddy but that's about it.

  26. #1376
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    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...

    Quote Originally Posted by blmpkn View Post
    I've been romping black-ops plastic pedals on my AM bike most of the season. Light, grippy, and priced right (50$) they get slick when it's baby**** muddy but that's about it.
    Baby**** muddy!!! LMAO!!!

  27. #1377
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    2014 pedals

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-reverse-components-201g-titanium-pedal.jpg
    Reverse Components Pedals 201g Trials Platform Pedal with titanium spindle.

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-reverse-components.jpg
    Reverse Components Pedals, pictured on the Krampus from Blue Lug Japan.

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-tritium-bearing.jpg
    Superstar UK Tritium Bearing platform. What is "Tritium" bearing? 400g pedals. Sounds like a gimmick.
    Lead actor Will of the Sun, Author Platform Pedal Shootout 820K views

  28. #1378
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    Three bikes and all three are sporting the Canfield Brothers Crampon Ultimates.
    Love them on every bike.

  29. #1379
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    konahonzo

  30. #1380
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    Please post the price along with the pics. As for me, my next Franklin is going towards shoes. Then pedals.
    The older I get, the faster I was.

  31. #1381
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    Hope New pedz

    Just got these bad boys

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-ka01.jpg

    Huge platform with only 11mm thickness!

  32. #1382
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    I have the red straitline de factos and I love them. haven't slipped off of them yet and I've been riding on them for a year now. they cost me $160.00
    Last edited by Jason Meadows; 12-23-2013 at 03:18 PM.

  33. #1383
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    The nice trial Platform seems to be an older design and is not in the 2014 catalogue anymore -> http://www.solidbikes.de/media/files...g_2014_web.pdf

    [QUOTE=illnacord;10880488]Click image for larger version. 

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    Reverse Components Pedals 201g Trials Platform Pedal with titanium spindle.

  34. #1384
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    A titanium spindle that thin isn't going to last.. even chromoly is suspect.
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  35. #1385
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    In July of 2012 I made a post with pictures comparing the Shimano Saint MX80 to some other familiar pedals. The Saints seemed like the perfect pedal and have served me well, but it might be time to try something else. The Saints developed play that didn't go away after a full rebuild. The bearing surfaces look surprisingly good but none of the inner bushings make contact with the spindle anymore (I assume they did at some point).

    Has anyone seen a Syntace NumberNine Titan pedal in person? Where can you even get those in the U.S? I have one of their stems and I'm impressed enough with their engineering that I'd consider buying the pedals if I could just find them!

    How are the Spank Spikes holding up? Can anyone do a size comparison to one of the pedals in the pictures from my July 2012 post?

  36. #1386
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yardstick View Post
    How are the Spank Spikes holding up? Can anyone do a size comparison to one of the pedals in the pictures from my July 2012 post?
    Over the last 2 years my spikes have gone through two whistler trips and an entire summer at the local bike park. I weigh about 170lbs geared up and the pedals have taken a beating by several rockstrikes. The sparks are a great pedal, with a large platform. Would definitely buy again for my dh bike.

  37. #1387
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yardstick View Post
    The Saints developed play that didn't go away after a full rebuild. The bearing surfaces look surprisingly good but none of the inner bushings make contact with the spindle anymore (I assume they did at some point).
    Strange. Saints are no different on the inside than other Shimano pedals. Cones contact the spindle, not bushings. Didn't adjusting the outboard cone remove play on the spindle/bearing assembly, without pedal body on? (It's not necessary to take the bearing assembly apart to overhaul the pedal BTW, simply adjust, tighten, pack new grease in body and drive the spindle/bearing in.)
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  38. #1388
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yardstick View Post
    How are the Spank Spikes holding up? Can anyone do a size comparison to one of the pedals in the pictures from my July 2012 post?
    I've beaten the **** outta them on South Mountain, among other places, for almost two years now. I've replaced exactly TWO pins and one pedal has less than 1/32" of play where you can pull it ever so slightly away from the crank.

    I wouldn't buy another pedal unless I got some ridiculous price on them. And it would have to be an insane price considering the relative low cost of the Spanks and the abuse they have withstood. I actually just bought a wider handle bar and spent an extra $20 on the Spank Spike EVO 777 when I could've gotten another for less. Just to show Spank some extra love.

  39. #1389
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Strange. Saints are no different on the inside than other Shimano pedals. Cones contact the spindle, not bushings. Didn't adjusting the outboard cone remove play on the spindle/bearing assembly, without pedal body on? (It's not necessary to take the bearing assembly apart to overhaul the pedal BTW, simply adjust, tighten, pack new grease in body and drive the spindle/bearing in.)
    These are my first Shimano pedals. Being unfamiliar with the maintenance routine (don't know where the instructions went) I took them all the way down. So the cup/cone bearings are the only things that should be taking load? I opened up the whole axle assembly and took off the gold anodized section. There are two white bushings in there and a dark bushing toward the crank end of the axle -all housed in the gold anodized part. Those bushings have all been making contact with the axle but they are a very loose fit from axle to bushing. Did I wear the bushings out? The bearing races look excellent. No pitting, galling or really any sign of wear! I hadn't noticed the play in them until my last ride.


    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    I've beaten the **** outta them on South Mountain, among other places, for almost two years now. I've replaced exactly TWO pins and one pedal has less than 1/32" of play where you can pull it ever so slightly away from the crank.

    I wouldn't buy another pedal unless I got some ridiculous price on them. And it would have to be an insane price considering the relative low cost of the Spanks and the abuse they have withstood. I actually just bought a wider handle bar and spent an extra $20 on the Spank Spike EVO 777 when I could've gotten another for less. Just to show Spank some extra love.
    I've seen your videos and I ride South Mountain a lot so that's a good endorsement!

    This is the comparison I wanted and it looks like I'll stick with the Saints for the q-factor with my big ol' feet.
    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...-7608444584_b1ec31fc9a_b.jpg

  40. #1390
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yardstick View Post
    This is the comparison I wanted and it looks like I'll stick with the Saints for the q-factor with my big ol' feet.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    From that picture it doesn't look like the Saint's are all that much bigger if you actually look at where the platform starts and ends on both pedals. There's a good 1/4" or 3/8" of "stuff" right next to the threads and before the platform whereas the Spanks' platform starts right after the threads. The Spanks would actually keep your feet closer to the crank. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing. Considering we tend to like wider bars you might want your feet further out. I dunno...

    And, that's not to say that the Saints aren't the best pedal for you. Just pointing out an observation...

  41. #1391
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    From that picture it doesn't look like the Saint's are all that much bigger if you actually look at where the platform starts and ends on both pedals. There's a good 1/4" or 3/8" of "stuff" right next to the threads and before the platform whereas the Spanks' platform starts right after the threads. The Spanks would actually keep your feet closer to the crank. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing. Considering we tend to like wider bars you might want your feet further out. I dunno...

    And, that's not to say that the Saints aren't the best pedal for you. Just pointing out an observation...
    The Spikes are also quite a bit thinner pedal, which would be nice. I need all the width I can get to keep my heels from contacting the seat-stays and chainstays on every pedal stroke, though.

  42. #1392
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    Makes perfect sense then...

  43. #1393
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    Yardstick, yes, there are 2 loose ball angular contact bearings preloaded against each other. A bushing-like part connects them, and it's the part that should have no play relative to the axle, which is achieved by outboard cone adjustment. (This play is what's perceived as pedal body play on the axle.)


    Check out this little article, up to the section on Dura-Ace, which are a different design. The special tools mentioned are not mandatory, they are for convenience. And the plastic part mentioned in that example is metal on Saints.


    Park Tool Co. » ParkTool Blog » SPD Pedal Overhaul


    For illustration, this is an XTR 98x spindle assembly. The part that should be adjusted out of play is the shinier grey cylinder next to the locknut and outboard cone.

    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  44. #1394
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Yardstick, yes, there are 2 loose ball angular contact bearings preloaded against each other. A bushing-like part connects them, and it's the part that should have no play relative to the axle, which is achieved by outboard cone adjustment. (This play is what's perceived as pedal body play on the axle.)


    Check out this little article, up to the section on Dura-Ace, which are a different design. The special tools mentioned are not mandatory, they are for convenience. And the plastic part mentioned in that example is metal on Saints.


    Park Tool Co. » ParkTool Blog » SPD Pedal Overhaul


    For illustration, this is an XTR 98x spindle assembly. The part that should be adjusted out of play is the shinier grey cylinder next to the locknut and outboard cone.
    That makes sense. I found that Park article after the rebuild too. Oops! On the Saints, the gold nut part has bushings inside. Should those make contact with the axle at all if the bearings are properly adjusted? I'm trying to figure out if my bearings got out of adjustment and I rode so long on the bushings that I wore them out. I found replacement axles with all the bearings and locknut for about $20 each. At that price it almost makes sense to buy new Saints on sale somewhere.

  45. #1395
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yardstick View Post
    I'm trying to figure out if my bearings got out of adjustment and I rode so long on the bushings that I wore them out.
    Good question, I'd like to know that too. ) I have not yet encountered a Shimano pedal that couldn't be made good by the procedure Park describes, though I mostly see SPD 520 and 540 models, but I did MX30 too, just haven't met a faulty MX80 yet.

    I may start riding MX80 because of platform shape if for any reason I get disappointed in doubly concave plastic BMX pedals, and I still haven't got my hands on a pair. Still riding AMPs. They started to look worn but their bushings have been very durable for me, 1 year going strong on the same set, with little amount of wet riding though.
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  46. #1396
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    I like Straitline's bushing approach. I was playing around with an AMP-inspired body design for the DeFacto spindle. I liked the AMP except that it put my feet way too close to the cranks and chainstays. The DeFacto wasn't much better.

    I should finish this and shop around to get a prototype made.

  47. #1397
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    Wow, yes that's an idea, just need to find aluminum alloy chunks the right size, and a good anodizing shop. Imagine those in hard ano?

    BTW, maybe do them truly double concave like Saints? That will be at the cost of some extra thickness, but still thinner than most ball bearing pedals, and with a strong fat axle.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  48. #1398
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    I understand the Shimano pedal much better now. I don't know why the system didn't make sense to me at first. I pulled one apart from a second set with less time on them (still tight). The bushings in the gold locknut must be backups in case the bearings get loose. Those bushings are nowhere near the axle in terms of mechanical tolerances/clearance. Once apart that gold locknut is loose on the axle of the tightest pedals I have. Its purpose is to lock that outer race into the pedal body. All of the load on the pedal goes through those bearings only. Interesting system. Even though they got loose, the bearings and races looked perfect. I'm rather impressed!

    Shaping is a little limited with the AMP/DeFacto hybrid. I was using the AMP for pedal body dimension references and the DeFacto for axle reference. The axle area of the pedal body is always going to have a bulge unless the pedal gets really thick. By the time you stack up the size of the axle and bushing and then allow for enough material to house it all, it gets big. I wanted to add a bulge or housing for the outboard thrust washers to keep them from dragging and squeaking on shoes too. I'm not sure how to proceed with that project. It wouldn't be hard to finish the design. I couldn't commit the money for even a small production run. Should I start a kickstarter project to judge interest and get funding? Then again, I wouldn't want to have Straitline coming after me for royalties or something.

  49. #1399
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    Oh thank you for clearing up the deal with those safety bushings! Yes that sounds very Shimano to implement such insurance.


    As for the custom pedal bodies.. first off yes, staying under the radar, at least until (and if) that takes off, would be safer I think.

    Isn't it possible to order just one prototype set machined, within reasonable price? There should be one-off CNC machine shops? It should go in very small quantities at first few iterations, for testing. Word will pick up in no time and you will have tester base among local cyclists (I hope). And those prototypes don't even have to be anodized. The very first thing to do would be to test bushing and axle fit; then proceed to machine the body shape.

    And to avoid washer to shoe contact, just make the axle channel bulge (well, pedal perimeter thickness would have to be increased accordingly) slightly thicker than it is on AMPs?
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  50. #1400
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    I looked into prototyping a much simpler GPS mount and got scared off with the prices. I could/should simplify the pedal design for prototyping and probably for any initial production. I'll see what I can do in the new year when I can spend some time with Solidworks again.

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