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  1. #1
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    One Ghost Industries

    anyone got one, looks real nice

    enduro/dh

  2. #2
    troubled economist
    Reputation: toowacky's Avatar
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    Don't own one...

    ...but OG's main guy (David) is located in Portland, OR. I've seen a couple of the demo bikes at Black Rock before, but never rode. Take that back, I pedaled and bounced around on their big bike once in a parking lot. I'm not sure if they have any non-prototype frames in production, but I've been impressed w/ the finish/machining in person.

    I'd say if you have a question, hit up the One Ghost Industries site or blog and email David, he's usually a pretty responsive guy.

  3. #3
    usually cranky
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    really cool bike.

  4. #4
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    was looking at pics. the longbow is fricken beautiful.

  5. #5
    Glad to Be Alive
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    weird.
    ......
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  6. #6
    OneGhostIndustries
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    Cheers!

    We are in production on our Tanto frame now as well as the Proletariat Belt drive bike from our Stop Cycles brand (www.stopcycles.com).
    We are ready to go into production on our Longbow and Genken frames also.
    We are testing a second DH frame named the Musashi which will be available late 2010 as a 2011 frame. Our Katana DH frame in on a diet currently and will be available by summer this year. The Wakizashi is undergoing some minor changes to lower the travel and putting a bend in the down tube to allow for a piggy back shock. With the help of pro slopestyle rider Nick Simicik, the new bike will be ready by spring this year also.

    hit us up any time:
    info@oneghost.com

  7. #7
    ******ed or Branded??
    Reputation: doodooboi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneghost
    We are in production on our Tanto frame now as well as the Proletariat Belt drive bike from our Stop Cycles brand (www.stopcycles.com).
    We are ready to go into production on our Longbow and Genken frames also.
    We are testing a second DH frame named the Musashi which will be available late 2010 as a 2011 frame. Our Katana DH frame in on a diet currently and will be available by summer this year. The Wakizashi is undergoing some minor changes to lower the travel and putting a bend in the down tube to allow for a piggy back shock. With the help of pro slopestyle rider Nick Simicik, the new bike will be ready by spring this year also.

    hit us up any time:
    info@oneghost.com

    your bikes did really caught my attention at I-bike. didn't get a chance to talk to you guys but would like to know more of the suspension platform. looks to me like a smilar DW or Maestro/vpp type of parallel linkage of a bike. is the axle path a rearward?
    .Hoog just texted me and said it's "Surface area to G2 tangential force vector ratio optimization. "

  8. #8
    OneGhostIndustries
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    nothing like a DW or Maestro set up. the geometry and link movement are way different and thus creating a different wheel/axle path for sure. the bikes have a rearward path at the first part of the stroke (the travel depends on the bike) followed by a vertical axle path and finally the axle comes closer to the center of the BB shrinking the wheelbase at just before bottom out. this is for when you g-out through a berm or landing and the short wheelbase and BB height will allow you to accelerate the bike like a hard tail. All the while the floating shock keeps the travel bottomless feeling and glued to the ground.

  9. #9
    ******ed or Branded??
    Reputation: doodooboi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneghost
    nothing like a DW or Maestro set up. the geometry and link movement are way different and thus creating a different wheel/axle path for sure. the bikes have a rearward path at the first part of the stroke (the travel depends on the bike) followed by a vertical axle path and finally the axle comes closer to the center of the BB shrinking the wheelbase at just before bottom out. this is for when you g-out through a berm or landing and the short wheelbase and BB height will allow you to accelerate the bike like a hard tail. All the while the floating shock keeps the travel bottomless feeling and glued to the ground.
    So with the Katana And Musahi (sp) what are the difference there besides weight. And also what suspension charateristics do they have and also any more rider input detail on the bike in the Original Post. Apologies for all the question. Just quite intersted in bike line up. Any way to demo these bad boys?
    .Hoog just texted me and said it's "Surface area to G2 tangential force vector ratio optimization. "

  10. #10
    Antitheist & Kitten lover
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    Tanto has always caught my eye.
    Race Mojo Wheels | Read VitalMTB

  11. #11
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    Very interesting looking lineup. Visually, the suspension setup looks very similar to Iron horse's DW lineup from the past few years. However, I suppose the manipulation of the links would result in a completely different axle path and ride characteristic.

    I really like the katana. Awesome to see some rad looking new designs.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
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    I like the Nihonto references for the bike frame names!
    Very cool... I'll bet there are a bunch of riders who are looking
    up Musashi on google now....
    my B+W landscape photos ....www.f45.com

  13. #13
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    double post, sorry.
    Last edited by Hesh to Steel; 01-06-2010 at 10:37 AM.

  14. #14
    biking is fun
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    That Slopestyle bike looks pretty sick! Id ride it.

  15. #15
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    So let me get this straight, the axle path goes backward, then vertical, and finally forward? Crap, I gotta get myself one of these.

    And the floating shock makes it feel bottomless and glued to the ground? Could you explain the science?

    I'm sorry, but they could use to cut some of the marketing bs out. They do look like pretty nice bikes though.

  16. #16
    maker of trail
    Reputation: essenmeinstuff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pslide
    So let me get this straight, the axle path goes backward, then vertical, and finally forward? Crap, I gotta get myself one of these.
    hahaha good point it shall be called VSP

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: crank1979's Avatar
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    That looks very similiar to the Pivot Firebird.

  18. #18
    OneGhostIndustries
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    Quote Originally Posted by doodooboi
    So with the Katana And Musahi (sp) what are the difference there besides weight. And also what suspension characteristics do they have and also any more rider input detail on the bike in the Original Post. Apologies for all the question. Just quite interested in bike line up. Any way to demo these bad boys?
    The shock placement on the katana with its forward rotating links helps to pull the wheel forward during the last 1/4 of travel. and the placement keeps the weight at the BB and provides a degree of forward kinetic energy to the bike. The Katana was designed to be a WC level rig with the Musashi being more of a lighter weight privateer or domestic racer. The Musashi is expected to come in at about 10 lbs for a 17" frame with an Elka coil shock. The Katana should weigh in at about 13 lbs. Current build on the Katana is 43 lbs with stainless steel pivot axles and a no-nonsense parts package. The final bike due this year will loose about 4 lbs from the frame by going to a hydroformed tubeset, more CNC machining and aluminum axles (we are also adding a sliding dropout to allow 1" of wheelbase movement so stay's will be adjustable from 17" to 18" and anywhere in between that. We are using the same type of system we developed for the Tanto for this.

    here is a review from mountain bike magazine during a test they did for an upcoming issue... the bike they rode was one of the prototype frames.....

    .."This bike is big, burly and not to be toyed with. It likes to go very fast and will consume all gravity given the slightest provocation. This bike, other than being hella strong, has two unique performance features that I really liked.
    The first is air. I found the bike a little difficult to catch big air on dirt-jump style ramps. I assume it is due to weight and suspension absorbing the face of the jump (and my non-DJ skills). But drops, on the other hand, are like nothing I have ever ridden. I found launching off drops and wood ramps to be easier than ever and I flew farther than normal. Landings were amazing smooth. I can't explain how the rear suspension feels different but it does. It almost felt like the bike had endless travel. However, on at least 2 drops I did feel the rear "rub" or "grind." Johnathon heard it and thought I bottomed out the rear but it didn't feel that way. It just sounded like the tire rubbed against something but there was no accompanying "brake feel." So I'm not sure what that was about.
    The second feature that I loved was cornering. We were running on some awesome tires, Muddy Marys, and the dirt was a mixed hard/soft/wet. Basically the trail surface was unpredictable. But that didn't seem to bother the Katana. When we got the bike from Rob he explained that it should be driven like a Porsche; "Haul ass into the corners, brake, turn and let go." That is so right. Given the slick conditions we were in the corners wanted to slide. This was no problem. The above brake, turn and go technique combined with a little purposeful slide ate the corners like cake. This was the closest I have come to drifting around a bermed corner. The bike held a solid line while having the rear kicked out in a slide.

    I'd love to write more but apparently have to go. "
    ....

    Hope some of this was not too full of marketing hype. I just design and build what I think is the coolest thing out there. Been riding for over 20 years and racing 16 of those 20 years so I have a small idea of what works and def. of what I like.

    Floating suspension helps keep the rear wheel glued to the ground at all times by giving a variable spring rate and movement to the shock. it is like having negative travel built in where the bike (not just ours but all bikes with a floating shock...Mondraker, Trek, Pivot....) the suspension pushes into the ground rather than pushing away from the ground.

    think about it like this.. a statically mounted shock only allows a static movement for the suspension, a dynamic shock mount will allow the rear wheel to track the ground under any condition. With a static shock mount the wheel and rear moving parts are at the mercy of the ground and they just want to bounce when the wheel hits a bump. A dynamic shock mount will allow the rear wheel to move with the terrain giving it true suspension. We just use a different type of link to achieve a different axle path, something I felt was lacking in any bike out there today.

  19. #19
    OneGhostIndustries
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pslide
    So let me get this straight, the axle path goes backward, then vertical, and finally forward? Crap, I gotta get myself one of these.

    And the floating shock makes it feel bottomless and glued to the ground? Could you explain the science?

    I'm sorry, but they could use to cut some of the marketing bs out. They do look like pretty nice bikes though.
    I try to not be too marketing heavy, I know it gets annoying (it does to me with other companies at least!) I was a marketing guy for a hand full of other companies and went to school for it so it is in my blood. I'll try to tone it down a bit more.
    Thanks for the though and fairness!

  20. #20
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    ye this hardtail looks very well designed/made.


  21. #21
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    Oneghost, you seem like a good guy and I like your positive attitude. I think the bikes are very well designed and thought out, and I hope you guys have lots of success.

    BUT, I don't think you'll find any suspension engineer that would back up these claims:

    Quote Originally Posted by oneghost
    Floating suspension helps keep the rear wheel glued to the ground at all times by giving a variable spring rate and movement to the shock. it is like having negative travel built in where the bike (not just ours but all bikes with a floating shock...Mondraker, Trek, Pivot....) the suspension pushes into the ground rather than pushing away from the ground.

    think about it like this.. a statically mounted shock only allows a static movement for the suspension, a dynamic shock mount will allow the rear wheel to track the ground under any condition. With a static shock mount the wheel and rear moving parts are at the mercy of the ground and they just want to bounce when the wheel hits a bump. A dynamic shock mount will allow the rear wheel to move with the terrain giving it true suspension.
    By having the shock attached to moving linkages at both ends, the only thing you are doing is giving yourself additional flexibility in tuning the leverage ratio curve and wheel rate. Of course, wheel rate is very important and will have a large effect on the feel of the bike and it's ability to track the ground - especially when working with a shock that is well matched to the leverage curve.

    And I don't think you could find a leverage curve produced by a "floating" shock design that you couldn't also produce with a single side actuated shock given total freedom in linkage design.

  22. #22
    from 0 - sideways 3.2 sec
    Reputation: derekr's Avatar
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    Just looks like another swoopy tubed abortion but i'll be happy to be wrong
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneghost
    Floating suspension helps keep the rear wheel glued to the ground at all times by giving a variable spring rate and movement to the shock. it is like having negative travel built in where the bike (not just ours but all bikes with a floating shock...Mondraker, Trek, Pivot....) the suspension pushes into the ground rather than pushing away from the ground.

    think about it like this.. a statically mounted shock only allows a static movement for the suspension, a dynamic shock mount will allow the rear wheel to track the ground under any condition. With a static shock mount the wheel and rear moving parts are at the mercy of the ground and they just want to bounce when the wheel hits a bump. A dynamic shock mount will allow the rear wheel to move with the terrain giving it true suspension. We just use a different type of link to achieve a different axle path, something I felt was lacking in any bike out there today.
    oneghost, I agree with Pslide about the presentation of your suspension theories, they reek of BS and make me question everything else you say. Technically every linkage driven bike has a floating shock, if you draw a line between all of the pivots on any(linkage driven) bike you are left with a four sided polygon and the shock is attached to two of those sides and when the suspension is activated the shock compresses. Manipulation of those pivots placement can give you whatever leverage curve you want, but stating(as fact not opinion) that any other non "floating" suspension system is inferior is just BS no two ways about it. Hold one of your bikes by one of the links that is connected to the shock and compress the suspension, your bike is now magically a "static shock" bike because on end of the shock doesn't move(because your holding it), it is all a matter of perspective.

    it is like having negative travel built in where the bike (not just ours but all bikes with a floating shock...Mondraker, Trek, Pivot....) the suspension pushes into the ground rather than pushing away from the ground.
    One more thing have you heard of Newtons third law? For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Do you really expect us to believe that you bike pushes only into the ground and not back up at the rider("away from the ground"), if this were true the suspension would never rebound unless your rear wheel went over a hole or into the air, because that is the only time it could extend by not "pushing away from the ground", up at the rider.

    I'm not trying to be a dick here, your bikes look very well thought out, I like the chainstay adjustment and the custom color options, its just you will put off a lot of customers by posting that garbage. You probably didn't intend for it to come out that way, but thats how I and other potential customers read it. I hope your company is successful, more options is always better when choosing a bike and as a small company you have the freedom to make the bikes how you think best not how the marketing department tells you to.

    While we are on the subject of constructive criticism, I think you should have geometry charts on your website for your bikes, the Genken ,for example, has no BB height or chainstay length listed. See the bottom of this page for example, while you are at it posting what the A2C of the fork, and the size tires used to find those numbers would be a nice touch that is often left out on other sites. Geometry numbers are very important to some people, I for example would not buy a bike without looking at the geo numbers.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
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    One Ghost -

    I see that you are new to MTBR (under this account name anyway). I would recommend you check out the following thread.

    Suspension Talk

    Proceed with caution.
    Only two infinite things exist: the universe and stupidity. And, I am unsure of the universe
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  25. #25
    RIDE4FUN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pslide
    So let me get this straight, the axle path goes backward, then vertical, and finally forward? Crap, I gotta get myself one of these. Look at a canfield frame.

    And the floating shock makes it feel bottomless and glued to the ground? Could you explain the science? Evil, Trek, Mondraker, Propain, and others use FF shock setups.

    I'm sorry, but they could use to cut some of the marketing bs out. They do look like pretty nice bikes though.
    I don't own and haven't ridden but these "bs claims" have been around for a while.
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