Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: VooDoo13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    839

    MRP System 3 (Fusion) vs E 13 SRS

    Let's hear it...
    You have bleed with Wallace.....now bleed with me!

  2. #2
    Pain is a way of life
    Reputation: paintmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    149
    I have the E13 SRS and once setup properly it is a flawless piece of equipment that does what it was designed to do. I am getting the MRP3 Fusion in a few weeks. I will let you know later on that one if you want.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: VooDoo13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    839
    Quote Originally Posted by paintmc
    I have the E13 SRS and once setup properly it is a flawless piece of equipment that does what it was designed to do. I am getting the MRP3 Fusion in a few weeks. I will let you know later on that one if you want.
    Same here...I ran E13's on two other bikes but I just ordered a System 3 (fusion) for this build. Just wanted to get some feedback...system 3 has solid reviews on MTBR.
    You have bleed with Wallace.....now bleed with me!

  4. #4
    Pain is a way of life
    Reputation: paintmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    149
    From what I was told, the MRP3 Fusion is a little (not much) less bombproof but runs a little smoother and is easier to setup. The only reason I am getting one is my new Scream isn't compatible with E13's. But I have been checking the mrp3 out and they looked real solid.

  5. #5
    i like rocks
    Reputation: euroford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,395
    all indications are that they both do the job they were indended to do very well. i went with the MRP 3 (regular not fusion) as i liked the design better and felt it looked to be higher quality. nice machining, roller run smooth. been very happy with it.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: d-rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by paintmc
    From what I was told, the MRP3 Fusion is a little (not much) less bombproof but runs a little smoother and is easier to setup. The only reason I am getting one is my new Scream isn't compatible with E13's. But I have been checking the mrp3 out and they looked real solid.

    all you need to set up an e.thirteen system on the scream is the SRS-W (I-OLD pattern) wide angle backplate designed specifically for bikes like the scream that have dropped chainstays. this will allow you to set up the system with ease.

  7. #7
    Glad to Be Alive
    Reputation: SHIVER ME TIMBERS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    42,291
    Quote Originally Posted by euroford
    all indications are that they both do the job they were indended to do very well. i went with the MRP 3 (regular not fusion) as i liked the design better and felt it looked to be higher quality. nice machining, roller run smooth. been very happy with it.

    same hear...it seems less "plasticly" then the E13
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  8. #8
    Chillin the Most
    Reputation: RED5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,029
    System 3 w/ Party Crasher basher (pic).


  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    47
    i was very pleased with my SRS.... but it was a real ***** to set up properly. i recently replaced it with a LG1, which i like even more, seems like it will hold the chain even better.

  10. #10
    Pain is a way of life
    Reputation: paintmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by d-rod
    all you need to set up an e.thirteen system on the scream is the SRS-W (I-OLD pattern) wide angle backplate designed specifically for bikes like the scream that have dropped chainstays. this will allow you to set up the system with ease.

    Thanx for the heads up. I'm gonna look intio this. I really love my E13 SRS on my other bike. I could have sworn I read on the E13 site that it wasn't compatible. Altought the MRP seems just as good.

  11. #11
    Committed
    Reputation: 1soulrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,606
    Both the E13 and the MRP guides work well, but I am really impressed with the Gamut guide.
    It is super easy to set up, lighter than the either E13 or MRP, and quite durable.
    A big plus for me is that the guys who make the guide are both local Norcal rider/racers, I like to support my fellow riders.
    Check them out... http://www.gamutusa.com/main.html

  12. #12
    _dw
    _dw is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,270
    Just to clear any mystery, the e.thirteen LG1 is the lightest guide on the market. There is none lighter, no matter what anyone tells you.

    Setup:
    As far as setup goes, both the mrp system 3 and gamut use an almost identical design to what the SRS pioneered in 2001, a back plate with sliders attached to a back plate that you need to space out in some way. The gamut design actually uses the same lower roller design as the original Evil Security guide of 2000, which was discontinued and improved upon in 2001 for performance reasons described below.

    In many ways, the e.thirteen guides are the easiest to set up of all. The entire unit comes assembled from the factory, and all you need to do to space it out is use the correct colored washers, It does not get easier. The mrp is spaced out in basically the same way, and the Gamut requires 2 different spacing adjustments, with limited adjustment capability for wide chainlines to set up correctly. The e.thirteen is the only system that has flush mount ISCG fasteners. On other guides you have to go crazy with a file or a grinder on your cranks. On an e.thirteen this is far less frequent. An e.thirteen will set up to a 2mm narrower chainline than the other guides can. This means zero modification for an e.thirteen in almost all setups. For the chances that you have a unique frame that doesn’t work with any guides (session 10, canfield), e.thirteen offers special back plates.

    Fine Tuning:
    One huge advantage that the e.thirteen’s have over both the other guides mentioned is that you can fine tune the guide even further by moving the sliders towards or away from the chainline. This is a 1-hand, 1-tool adjustment that takes all of 15 seconds to do.

    Construction:
    The e.thirteen's composite sliders will last for more than a season of heavy use, whereas the sliders used on the other guides are made from a much softer material that wears more quickly and can allow for a chain to gouge in and jam. The composite sliders on the e.thirteen are made from an advanced fiber reinforced thermoplastic. They cost a lot to make, and they were designed with function in mind. They may not look like much, but there is a huge amount of engineering that went into them. Hold one in your hand an look at all the minute details, from the mud clearance slots and other mud clearing features, to tapered stiffening ribs, they are actually pretty trick little parts.

    Rollers and chain support:
    The other guides support the chain on by the side plates. The side plates are static; they exist in a chain to transmit force. The side plates on bicycle chains are scalloped to reduce weight. When the scallop rolls over the roller on the mrp and gamut, it bounces, and makes noise, while at the same time dropping drivetrain efficiency. A hard roller is very noisy. The MRP has a soft roller, which helps to reduce this noise, but the vibration and power loss is still there. The e.thirteen has a thermoplastic urethane (TPU) idler gear that supports the chain the way that it is intended, by the rolling elements. This makes the e.thirteen guides the quietest and most efficient available. The sound level measurement for all guides has been verified by a dB meter in a lab setting, and you can hear it on the trail.

    Intangibles:
    e.thirteen is a small and young company (Only 4 full-time employees), but in a short time has gained a strong rider following for several reasons.
    1- customer support: We work incessantly to help our customers make the right decisions and to get their guides onto their bike as simply as possible. E.thirteen set the bar for chain retention system simplicity. Our full time tech support staff is on call every day through e-mail or by phone. We work with our distributors to educate their tech staff in how to work with e.thirteen customers, and we never stop trying to improve.
    2- Tech support at races: We field tech support at races and events on both sides of the country in the USA, in Canada, and Internationally every race weekend. No other chainguide builder can say that.
    3- Grassroots racing support: No other chainguide company has ever supported hometown racing as devotedly as e.thirteen. Instead of paying riders to race our products, we spend our money on supporting race series all over the world. We help to keep lifts open and series organized so that people can get out and ride their bikes. After all, we are riders too.
    4- USA built product: All e.thirteen products are built in the USA. Engineered in the USA, Machined in the USA, Anodized, Injection Molded, Assembled, Packaged, Warehoused, and Shipped. Everything save for the chainring bolts is 100% done in the USA. Ask the other guys where they are making their parts.

    All in all there are a lot of chainguides on the market, lots of options, and lots of opinions. From a product standpoint, I don’t think that any other guide has the level of thought, engineering, support, or quality that an e.thirteen does. E.thirteen builds Chain Retention Systems. They all use the name Security in the name because they are designed to work. This is the reason why so many pro riders CHOOSE e.thirteen products. They work, and they offer something that money can’t buy. Peace of mind and security.

    Now go ride your bike and have fun!

    Dave
    dw★link
    Split Pivot
    @daveweagle -Twitter

  13. #13
    i like rocks
    Reputation: euroford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,395
    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    The e.thirteen is the only system that has flush mount ISCG fasteners. On other guides you have to go crazy with a file or a grinder on your cranks.
    my MRP has countersunk flush mount fasteners.

    thanks for the write up.

    now if only we could get an MRP employee to provide a simular one for an accurate compair and contrast. haha

  14. #14
    _dw
    _dw is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,270
    Quote Originally Posted by euroford
    my MRP has countersunk flush mount fasteners.

    thanks for the write up.

    now if only we could get an MRP employee to provide a simular one for an accurate compair and contrast. haha
    You are right, the MRP fasteners are countersunk, but they are not flush. They stick up from the surface of the back plate by 1mm. Sometimes (actually lots of times) that's the difference between grinding and not grinding. Some wise person said once, "The devils in the details" I don't know who they were, but it seems accurate..

    Dave
    dw★link
    Split Pivot
    @daveweagle -Twitter

  15. #15
    Chillin the Most
    Reputation: RED5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,029
    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    In many ways, the e.thirteen guides are the easiest to set up of all.
    While I wish this were true, it has not been the case for me. I have purchased several of your E13 SRS guides and not one of them has been able to be mounted to my 03 Big Hit. I even spoke with your setup gurus on the phone and the only solution that would work is to use an 83mm BB, which would give me cr@p for a chainline.

    However, all of my MRP's, Sys2 & my beautiful new Sys3 w/party crasher bashie, were so easy a caveman could have done it.

    FWIW, I love my E13 Boxxer stem.

  16. #16
    _dw
    _dw is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,270
    Quote Originally Posted by red5
    While I wish this were true, it has not been the case for me. I have purchased several of your E13 SRS guides and not one of them has been able to be mounted to my 03 Big Hit. I even spoke with your setup gurus on the phone and the only solution that would work is to use an 83mm BB, which would give me cr@p for a chainline.

    However, all of my MRP's, Sys2 & my beautiful new Sys3 w/party crasher bashie, were so easy a caveman could have done it.

    FWIW, I love my E13 Boxxer stem.
    The 03 Bighit is a special case. Here's the deal.

    The Big hit has ISCG tabs integrated into the frame. The ISCG tabs are rotated way too far forward, out of ISCG spec. Because of this, the ISCG back plate can't bolt to the Big Hit tabs becuase it causes the lower part of the back plate to hit the swingarm. The only solution would be to run the ISCG adapter plate spaced outbound and a 122+ spindle (but not an 84mm shell).

    The alternative woudl be for e.thirteen to modify the chainguide design, and add even more rotation adjustment in the guide, but this just allows riders to set the guide up rotated into all kinds of funky combinations on other bikes that conform to the ISCG standard, so we figured that we would take the lesser of the two evils. In the long run we feel that it gives a better setup for everyone. After all, if our product won't work on your bike, there is no way we will try to sell it to you. We want you to be happy with your bike and our product. It is the basis of what founded the company and we feel like no $ amount is worth breaking with that value.

    I think that the newer big hit bikes are cured of this. I am psyched to hear that you like that stem. That's kind of a special product for us, originally made due to the request of some industry friends when the standard started, and riders dig it. I have them on 3 bikes .

    Dave
    dw★link
    Split Pivot
    @daveweagle -Twitter

  17. #17
    Chillin the Most
    Reputation: RED5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,029
    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    The only solution would be to run the ISCG adapter plate spaced outbound and a 122+ spindle (but not an 84mm shell).

    I am psyched to hear that you like that stem.

    Dave
    Yeah sorry about that, I meant 128mm BB. Either way, bad chainline.

    Yep, stem is the shizz.

    Thanks Dave.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: VooDoo13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    839
    Damn...it's not often you post a product question and the designer himself shows up to answer it. Very cool. Hey Dave can I get a t-shirt? Or maybe a free Sunday? PM me and I'll shoot ya my shipping address.
    You have bleed with Wallace.....now bleed with me!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •