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Thread: Manitou Dorado

  1. #1
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    Manitou Dorado

    Who has one and how do you like it. I am thinking about getting one but cannot find many reviews on them.

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    I just got one of the Experts and I like it a lot. I am coming from an older Fox 40 and I could immediately tell that it was much more plush. There are not many reviews on them, but all the ones I did find and people I talked to really liked them. They are supposed to require less service then a 40 and you get one free servicing from Manitou within the first year! Now that is hard to beat.

    The fork has no hard bottom out and feels smooth all the way through the travel. I have heard some say that they are a bit finicky in getting them set-up, but I found it very easy to do. Their instructions are crystal clear and they give lots of examples and good explanations on each of the adjustments.

    Here is mine on my Demo:



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    I haven't found much reviews since the 2010 carbon version came out. But the ones I have found have been positive and the only compliant if any was the stiffness.

    This came out yesterday:
    » Manitou Dorado 2013 Expert vs. Pro Downhill Suspension Fork - Sick Lines – mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource

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    Love my Manitou Dorado Pro. I have the 2012 version on a WFO9 29er. I mostly ride xc but some of our trails are really chunky with big downhills. I have 3 months of hard riding on it and it works great. I dont do jumps though. It was really easy to set up adjustment wise. Very plush. Wouldnt hesitate to get another.

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    oops, someone beat me with the link.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ifouiripilay View Post
    I haven't found much reviews since the 2010 carbon version came out. But the ones I have found have been positive and the only compliant if any was the stiffness.

    This came out yesterday:
    » Manitou Dorado 2013 Expert vs. Pro Downhill Suspension Fork - Sick Lines – mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource
    Nice little write-up. I think we will hear more about them in the future as more people start to ride them.

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    I've been running one since '10 (although it didn't get ridden last year due to injury), and it's been awesome. Only service was to replace 1 blown seal - the 2 guys I rode with had a Boxxer WC and a Fox 40, I'm bigger and tend to ride faster and they both had way more issues than I had. I didn't really notice that flex was an issue - I think that a bit of flex allows the wheel to deflect slightly at speed and keep the bike feeling more stable...

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    There is a pretty sweet video of a dude rippin one on pinkbike today.. winter depression is the name of the video, looks like he likes it..
    BBZ

    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy - Benjamin Franklin

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    And here is another one of a guy rippin' it!



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    I meant winter destruction...


    <object width='500' height='212'><param name='allowFullScreen' value='true' /><param name='allowScriptAccess' value='always' /><param name='movie' value='http://www.pinkbike.com/v/297017/l/' /><embed src='http://www.pinkbike.com/v/297017/l/' type='application/x-shockwave-flash' width='500' height='212' allowFullScreen='true' allowScriptAccess='always'></embed></object><p><a href='http://www.pinkbike.com/video/297017/'>Tyler Gorz - Winter Destruction</a> on <a href='http://www.pinkbike.com'>Pinkbike</a></p>
    BBZ

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  11. #11
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    i ride the dorado pro 12" one season and i am happy super fast riding fork in any situation, air adjust for any rider lb. no more arm bumping, easy to adjust "super manual", and no problems since 8mt! i ride boxxer BOS rare and a short time fox 40 rc2 kashima. but i ride the dorade again and again and....

    ride.

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    Are there any major differences from the 2011 to the 2013 Dorados. Is the 2011 "pro" basically the 2013 Expert? I'm looking at a bike that has a 2011 Dorado. My plan initially was to buy the 2013 pro but if they are basically the same I'll take the complete bike for now and blow my load next year

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    There have been no major changes to the fork so far. Colors in logos is one and they did something with the air chamber I think. But otherwise they are the same. The Expert is a bit heavier than the Pro......

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    Thanks. So I guess I'll save some money this year and the go for all carbon frame and parts and the Dorado pro next year

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    dorado expert 6000 alu dorado pro 7000 alu otherwise same tech.

    ride.

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    The subtle differences are hard to see but Manitou has essentially saved on machine time on the Expert by reducing the amount of machining on the upper and lower crowns. In addition to the machining difference, there is also a matte finish as well as a different aluminum specification used to save some money during production.

    Dorado Expert - less machining in the upper and lower crown

    Dorado Pro - more machining in the upper and lower crowns

    With these changes, the Dorado Pro ends up coming in a bit lighter than the Expert. Other than that, the Pro and the Expert are exactly the same.

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    The 2 posts above hit it. Aluminum difference and less weight saving machining. The internals are the same.

    I've owned a Boxxer Team, Fox 40, 888 Evo Ti and now ride a Dorado Pro.

    40 = great damping and stiff
    888 = amazingly smooth over bumps
    Dorado = great damping - less harsh feedback
    Boxxer = don't buy one personal here, I just don't like SRAM

    The Dorado is not as stiff as either the 40 or 888; but it has better damping than the 888, but the 888 is the smoothest over stutter/braking bumps. The Dorado has a different fell as an invert, less feedback on hits I'd say. As you can see they all have the place they shine.

    The problem with the 40 is they don't have a cheaper version like the other 3 brands.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

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    I just ordered a Dorado Expert last night. Super good deal. Save some $$$ over the Pro for .27 lbs or so difference. I'm cool w/ that. I've only heard great things about the fork. My buddy Todd rides one. He came off of a boxxer w/ the Avy cartridge. He said it is one of the best feeling forks he's ever been out. Guy is a good rider too so i trust his opinion. OP, what bike are you putting yours on?

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    Subscribed.....Just installed my Dorado Pro on my DHR. It'll be my first dc fork, so can't make comparisons. Looks sick!

  20. #20
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    I bought the Dorado Pro and put it on a 2012 V-10 Carbon with a DB Air upgrade. I will post pictures when I have finished putting it togeather next week.

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    I'm seeing so many people switching to this fork. Mine is going on my Legend. Before i install i thought i'm getting the frame painted. 3 years of polish and its looking bad. Time for a powder coat for some color.

    Will also post when that stuff is done.. thinking next 2 or 3 weeks.

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    hii

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    I am glad to see more people running them this year. I think it was a great Idea for Manitou to come out with this Expert model. The only thing I suggest is changing out the stainless hardware with 12.9 grade. Stock seems super soft and mine began to get slop real easily even with using my torque wrench.

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    What's the difference between the Dorado Carbon and Dorado Pro? No internal changes? Did the carbon have the machined crowns and axle lugs? So is the carbon lighter? Or are the carbon legs the same weight as the 7000 series legs so they stopped making them?
    Keep the Country country.

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    Thanks for the heads up!

    Quote Originally Posted by Carraig042 View Post
    I am glad to see more people running them this year. I think it was a great Idea for Manitou to come out with this Expert model. The only thing I suggest is changing out the stainless hardware with 12.9 grade. Stock seems super soft and mine began to get slop real easily even with using my torque wrench.

    -Brett

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    What's the difference between the Dorado Carbon and Dorado Pro? No internal changes? Did the carbon have the machined crowns and axle lugs? So is the carbon lighter? Or are the carbon legs the same weight as the 7000 series legs so they stopped making them?
    Just weight. The first year they only made the Dorado in carbon. It was made at Hayes in Milwaukee, WI. Once they got the design down they started making them out of AL in Taiwan.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ithnu View Post
    Just weight. The first year they only made the Dorado in carbon. It was made at Hayes in Milwaukee, WI. Once they got the design down they started making them out of AL in Taiwan.
    So the carbon has the same crowns, axle lugs, everything as the Pro but the carbon legs are lighter than the 7000 series?
    It sounds like the damper hasn't changed over the years but was there some small change to the spring? Anyone know what exactly? If you get a first or second year carbon do you want to send the spring cart to Manitou for an upgrade?
    Last edited by Lelandjt; 02-25-2013 at 06:31 PM.
    Keep the Country country.

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    Does the fork still come in a gun case?

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    No gun case, 1 brake adapter -mine post mount, 1 top crown, fork pump.

  30. #30
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    From Pink Bike
    Manitou Dorado - Reviewed
    Sep 18, 2009
    by Mike Levy
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    Back in February of this year you may have caught our preview of the Manitou Dorado that we have had on test since that time. It's been a long time since we've caused such a stir on the website. With about 200 comments and too many reads to count, it easily garnered the most attention of any of the products to hit the front page in recent memory. But I guess that was sort of expected. I can't remember a single new product causing quite the crap storm of interest, but with carbon legs and a massive price tag it was bound to do that. And let's not forget that it is from Manitou, a name that many once swore by but that had fallen by the way side in more recent times. There are a few good questions to answer, mainly is the new Dorado really that good?

    Read on to find out what we think about the latest wonder fork from Manitou.

    Manitou Dorado


    What's on the outside?

    Out of the box and into my hands, my first thought was not how light it is (although it is relatively light), or even how quickly I could manage to get it on my current test bike, but instead how nicely it was finished. The made in the U.S.A. fork is just beautiful. As you would expect, the carbon legs are stunning with the cosmetic weave easy to see. My heart always beats a few beats faster when I am holding anything made of the black wonder material. Carbon has its detractors, but it is hard to argue that it doesn't look stunning. The upper tubes bulge slightly at the lower crown and continue down at the same diameter. The upper and lower crowns each clamp onto anodized gold aluminum sleeves that have been bonded to the carbon tubes, increasing clamp diameter and protecting the carbon at the same time.

    Aluminum sleeves give the crowns a strong place to clamp while protecting the carbon

    The crowns look up to the task, the lower crown itself is massive. Tolerances seem to be just right, as in you don't need a hammer to get your top crown on and in position. The top crown fits an integrated stem and uses the same standard that you will find on Boxxers or Fox 40s. All crown pinch bolts are drilled A270 rust resistant bolts, details. There is a smart hose guide on the lower crown which uses a single 2.5 mm allen bolt, nice to see they didn't decide to use anything smaller like some other rather cheesy hose guides. The aluminum steerer tube is butted as well.






    Upper and lower fork crown detail

    The decals themselves are a step above what we usually see in the bicycle industry. The thick vinyl graphics don't look like they will be separating themselves from the legs anytime soon, which is nice because I think they look pretty damn sharp. It is great to see the MRD (Manitou Racing Development) logo make a return to the range, signifying that this fork sits at the top of the fork hierarchy.

    Manitou Racing Development

    The stanchions are 36 mm across and are protected via sturdy plastic guards. The original Dorado leg guards were quite brittle, having a tendency to crack before bending. These are thick and flexible so they should last much longer. They also have aluminum sleeves in each bolt hole to prevent cracking due to over tightening or an accident. Three 2.5 mm bolts hold each guard in its place and the left has a built in hose guide.

    The HexLock axle






    HexLock axle and steel pinch bolt inserts

    The Dorado accepts standard 20 mm x 110 mm thru-axle hubs and uses Manitou's 6 sided HexLock axle system. Two pinch bolts per side hold the axle in place, and they thread into replaceable steel inserts that prevent any permanent damage from over tightening. The fork uses a modular brake adapter and comes with both 8" post mount and I.S. mount.

    Modular brake mount






    8" post mount adapter and 8" I.S. adapter

    Hand made in the U.S.A.






    Frame bumper, clean and simple hose guide


    What's on the inside?

    I got a chance to pull apart the Dorado with one of Manitou's head guys, Nick Pyne, so I couldn't turn it down. Nick knows his stuff really well, and when he sunk his teeth into the Dorado it was evident that not only did they invest a lot of money, effort, and time into the design and construction of the Dorado, but it was worth the extra money. Over the years we've been sold some pretty hokey fork internals, most of us without really knowing. A lot of riders would be surprised to find that their fork that was top of the range only a few seasons back actually uses technology taken from moto forks built in the '70's and '80's. The Dorado internals are about as far from that as you could get. Inside you'll find nothing but cnc'd aluminum bits, most anodized for long term durability, no unfinished edges or any sacrifice in quality to be seen. All the parts are constructed out of durable materials to ensure each tear down and rebuild does not leave your fork feeling worse than before.

    Dorado's TPC+ assembly completely removed

    All the words Nick threw out sound technical, and the diagrams look good, but the Dorado is best understood once you get inside. The damping assembly is designed, and laid out perfectly. As it's an inverted fork Mantiou has put the damping assembly at the bottom of the leg, meaning whenever you're riding the oil is keeping the items lubricated that need it the most. The rebound assembly fits directly into the damper, which is housed inside a closed bath system. This closed bath system includes the complete TPC+ assembly, rebound assembly, and hydraulic bottom out assembly, all neatly tied up and sealed inside this unit.

    The TPC+ unit sits at the bottom of the damping leg, both the LSC (red dial) and HSC (black dial) are located here

    Damping cartridge completely removed from the lower leg, inner tube separated from the cartridge body

    TPC+ removed from inner tube

    Rebound damping piston and top out cone

    On the opposite side of the fork is the self equalizing air spring system. This system was simpler compared to the damping assembly, but still shouted quality engineering. Once inside the air spring leg it was fairly obviously what each component did. It consisted of one large air chamber, one piston, and a few odd looking parts that once they were explained looked very functional. At the top of this leg is the Air input valve, and you guessed it, that's where you air up your spring. Clearly stated on the cap is the recommended settings for air pressure, and a warning to not remove air from this valve. Should you need to remove air, you'll have to do so via the lower air valve at the bottom of the leg. Remember, the Dorado features self equalizing air chambers for positive and negative.

    Travel adjustment from 8" to 7" is accomplished by moving the C-clip (trapped under gold nut) to a new position closing the nut over it

    As you can clearly see on the air spring is a nut, and a rubber stopper. These are both 2 completely functional features about the fork, the top out bumper, and the travel adjustment. Stuck on the end of the air piston is what's referred to as a poppet valve. This valve is what equalizes the pressure between the positive, and negative chamber, a pretty helpful little unit. All wrapped in a thick rubber seal to keep the pressure in the right areas, and sealed in a leg. That is what the air spring leg consists of.

    Air piston and poppet valve

    Air piston and poppet valve

    Graph showing Dorado air spring rate versus relative coil spring

    All these fancy components and parts to the Dorado would be completely useless if they were not correctly protected, and sealed. All housed inside dual layered carbon legs and protected by not 1, not 2, but 3 seals insures the Dorado's internals are well protected from the elements that be. All the external adjustments are well labeled and are noticeable right away once used. The Dorado is a really well thought out, and well constructed fork worthy of the investment.


    And Finally The Riding Impressions

    Manitou is really leading the way in appearance and aesthetic with the carbon legged Dorado. As we already covered, the finish and attention to detail is more than unrivaled by any other manufacturer. For those riders who are paying top dollar for this top piece of kit it is going to need to do a whole lot more than simply look pretty in the garage. In short, it has to work better. There are those who will happily hand over their hard-earned money for the Dorado, oblivious and uncaring as to whether there really is a performance gap between it and the less expensive competition. But that is not where the new fork (and the reborn Manitou name) will earn it's reputation. Pro and expert level riders who push hard and know exactly what is happening under them while up to speed, riders who take the time to shape their suspension into something that can and will help their cause on the trail, those who know that there is an advantage to be had, those are the people who should have a go on this fork. After only the first few rides it was painfully clear that it really was working better.

    The impressive thing about the Dorado is how it manages to deal with it all quite easily, never feeling like it is working overly hard to move the front wheel out of the way. The initial entry into it's travel is not as supple as some would hope, although that is of zero consequence when on the dirt. The Dorado always garnered attention at the trail heads and I could only smile and nod when another rider gave it a push in the lot and declared it "nothing special", I mean there really is nothing to say to that and I can't go lending the bike out to every rider now can I. Get rolling with some proper terrain passing under you and that is when you will realize that yes, something special is happening.

    Click the HD video to see some slow-motion action with the new Dorado

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    That silky smooth top end that seemed to be lacking while at a standstill obviously has nothing to do with riding the fork in real time, as the smallest irregularities on the ground were simply erased from below me. I'm talking about the things that we don't see when riding above our limits and looking far ahead, those little things that make you back back up the trail to see what it was that was giving you so much trouble. How the fork deals so well with the smaller issues I don't know, but it passes nearly none of it up and into the bars, even more importantly, it seems to greatly reduce the amplitude of the these nuisance bits of any trail before they reach your tires. A lot of beating around the bush when what I am trying to say is that the end result is greater traction. Then again, that is what suspension is there for, now isn't it? This is simply what happens when that very suspension is working very, very well at its job. It is easy to argue that another brand's fork could be set up to accomplish the same thing, and that's true, but that fork would then be lacking in other departments and at the very least require a skilled and knowledgeable tuner to do multiple rebuilds and tinker with things that most of us don't know how to tinker with. Out of the box (or gun case as it may be) the Dorado has no peers in this category, but gives up no ground at any other point in it's travel as well.

    Graph shows TPC+ compression damping curve and adjustment range versus a more classic system

    Past the smaller bothers and into it's travel, the fork never complained. It seems to me that there are certain forks out there that are guilty of not being able to properly transition deeper into their stroke without over reacting. Why would I want to use all my travel when I should only be using part of it? Now that we seem to have settled on 8" up front there is a lot of room to get things wrong, much more than on a shorter stroke AM bike, using too much of that travel too often can have disastrous effects on your bike's handling and it isn't helped by having that much or more travel in the back of the bike. The Dorado is not plagued by this common problem. Hard braking did far less to upset the bikes geometry than what I was used to. The anodized red low-speed compression (LSC) dial had a noticeable effect in keeping the bike from diving, but at the same time the fork was never harsh, even with the LSC fully closed. When LSC was at full open it was still more controlled than the competition, although I would still like to see an even wider range of adjustment available externally.

    Up to speed and the fork is fully in control of what is going on. It took some time to realize that the Dorado really was working hard at it's job, mainly because it went about dealing with the common lumps and edges that are on all our trails so well. The fork's mid-stroke was practically erasing whatever it was that was under me. No spikes and no surprises, leaving me to concentrate on getting down the trail. This took the longest to understand. I don't want to describe the feeling as vague, because it was far from it, but it really muted a lot of terrain that would have had me tensing up. Stay relaxed and let the suspension deal with it as it does. What more could you really ask for?

    Watch pro racer Jason Memmelaar have some fun with the Dorado

    Views:10564 Faves:57 Comments:22 Add to my Favorites

    The hydraulic bottoming cone does what one would hope. Not once, despite some impressive mistakes, was I able to really close down hard at the end of the stroke. Full travel was used, but by the time I managed to get there it was far more of a soft bottom than a hard finish. It's a wonder why other forks don't take advantage of this system, although I'm sure they'd give you a reason why. Manitou uses a similar arrangement to control the opposite end of the stroke and it proved just as useful there as well. I have read a few complaints of some minor topping out of early production run Dorados that were shipped without this top out cone, but I've been told that every fork now has this system installed. I want to make the next statement as clear as possible: the Dorado is not flexible and I would argue that what resiliency is there is helping and not a hindrance. Not at any point during my time on the fork did I wish for it to be any stiffer torsionally. End of story.

    Hydraulic bottoming cone

    There are forks available that come very close to matching the Dorado in certain areas of detail, but there is not a single fork that is as polished all around as the carbon tubed Manitou, it inspires confidence in every situation. The entire stroke is nothing but quality, there really is no compromising at any point in the travel. No giving up one trait to gain another and certainly no awkward moments that make you wonder what just happened. You get to have your cake and eat it as well. Although it's one expensive cake.

    Other Notes...

    The seals that Manitou chose to use on the Dorado seem to be up to the task and then some. While only a few months time is hardly enough to report any long term verdicts, they let nary a drop of oil by. Zero. Zilch. Hell, there wasn't even the slightest wisp of oil left on the lower tube after any compression. I have high hopes that they will perform as well further into the future.






    Manitou Dorado outer, inner, and installed seal detail

    Having had many seasons on the old Dorado and going through too many stanchion guards to remember, I can happily report that won't be the case with the new version. The guards are thick and flexible, with aluminum inserts at the screw holes to keep the fastening bolts from pulling through. Not one was broken during the test and I doubt it is going to happen anytime soon.




    Robust but flexible stanchion guards are up for some abuse

    One point of contention was discovered after the Dorado equipped test bike was left to sit unused for a few weeks. It was evident that the fork was not at its best after the long break, not the least bit eager to enter its travel. Everything was back to normal after a quick burn or two, but it may be important to store the bike upside down when not used for extended periods.


    So what do I really think?

    The truth is that no matter how good the Dorado is, and it really is that good, there will be those that will find fault with it. Let's be honest here, it could be easy to find something to pick out: it's carbon and no matter how much proof is out there or how well it is made you are sure that you will snap it in two simply by loading it onto your bike rack! And of course it's inverted and you simply will not be able to ride down your local hill without the front wheel pointing off in the wrong direction! Oh yeah, it's holy-**** expensive and you... Ok, I'll give you that one as I'll never be able to afford it either! But wait, the new aluminum legged version sporting the same amazing internals could be just the ticket for us bike bums. I'll be truthful, when bits of info and pictures of the new Dorado were first made available I immediately balked at the prospect of the new fork. Even though I'd had plenty of great experiences with TPC+ damping in both the original Dorado, and later a much loved 7" Travis, I still was not sold on the new fork as a whole. At a much greater price than some of the competition, as well as a much flashier appearance, I almost wanted it to not live up to the expectations. That is obviously not the case. As much as I would like to find fault with the Dorado, speaking strictly about the fork's performance, I simply can't. Pretty much every suspension company out there manages to produce a full fledged DH fork that will never hold most of us back, none of the other top forks are exactly dogs, but with the Dorado on the front of my bike I had more confidence than ever before and that says a lot. At the end of it you can find all the faults you like, the reality is that this is the highest performing no-compromise DH fork available to consumers out of the box.

    Mike "Kakah" Levy

  31. #31
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    Got mine today.

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    Pics?

    Vital just posted up a review of the expert.

    -Brett
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carraig042 View Post
    Pics?

    Vital just posted up a review of the expert.

    -Brett
    Thanks for posting the review. Only have two short rides on mine, so still tuning it.

    "Finally, one quick tip that could save you a headache - be sure to snug the small bolts on the fork guards often, or consider adding Loc-Tite to the threads for a set and forget solution."

    Don't miss this step above, I never checked when installing the fork and two short rides later, I've lost one bolt from the guards already.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carraig042 View Post
    Pics?

    Vital just posted up a review of the expert.

    -Brett
    They say it has a significantly longer axle-crown than a Fox 40. Is there something limiting how far the legs can be slid up in the crowns? Since most forks allow you to slide them up till the tire's about to hit the crown on bottom-out the difference among DH forks, minimum height is usually negligible.

    I've slid my 888 up and down on various frames but currently running it at max height which is dictated by where the butting starts above the lower crown. Its min height line is about 15mm lower. I wish I had its A-C numbers here.
    Keep the Country country.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    They say it has a significantly longer axle-crown than a Fox 40. Is there something limiting how far the legs can be slid up in the crowns? Since most forks allow you to slide them up till the tire's about to hit the crown on bottom-out the difference among DH forks, minimum height is usually negligible.

    I've slid my 888 up and down on various frames but currently running it at max height which is dictated by where the butting starts above the lower crown. Its min height line is about 15mm lower. I wish I had its A-C numbers here.

    What limits you from going further than the highest/lowest setting on axle to crown length is the physical taper of the uppers. You only have that certain range that is flat for the lower clamp.

    -Brett
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  36. #36
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    So is the 591mm A-C measurement in the review the minimum length? If anyone is running it at that position how much space does it leave between the axle and crown at bottom-out?
    Keep the Country country.

  37. #37
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    567-591 is the A-C Length. To get a rough number with the suspension compressed, just subtract 203mm for the travel.

    Specs from Manitou

    -Brett
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  38. #38
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    I think the 567 is the A-C in the 180 travel setting, not the other end of the height range. If 591 is the lowest it goes that is kinda tall, way taller than any 26" tire needs. I don't have my DH fork here to measure but I remember my Minion 2.7" measured 26.9". A lower crown is maybe 25mm tall. So minimum height on a 40, Boxxer, or 888 is about 570-575mm. That matches up with what the review says. Since I like the fork on my V10 raised some this should be close enough for me but it's weird that Manitou made it so tall.

    The Vital review has a quick blurb about a different legged 650 model. To run 29" wheels you just install a spacer so it's odd that they'd make a different fork for 650. Also, their website says nothing about that. I emailed Manitou for more info about this and also asked what the axle-crown range is.
    Last edited by Lelandjt; 03-05-2013 at 10:51 AM.
    Keep the Country country.

  39. #39
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    No, it adjustable with the A-C measurement. the Lowest is approx 567mm. My A-C measurement is about 580mm and I could drop it down another 10mm or so. This is with the 203mm travel. If you are worried about tire size, then look at this.

    With 180mm travel setting you have 189mm of minimum tire clearance, maximum tire radius of 345mm and max tire width of 80mm.

    With travel set to 203mm you have a minimum tire clearance of 212mm a maximum tire radius and width is the same
    Visit my Youtube channel for lots of DH and XC videos!
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  40. #40
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    Oh, then all that talk of fork height in the review was rubbish. It's got the same range as every other DH fork (give or take a little difference in crown thickness), with tire clearance as the limiting factor.

    Manitou got back to me on the 650 version. It will have unique legs and internals to preserve 200mm travel with the bigger wheels. I guess a modified version of their 29er kit could be used to limit travel of the regular fork enough to use a 650 wheel.
    Keep the Country country.

  41. #41
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    hey guys, just registered for some advice from you guys on dorados.
    i've just fitted a pair of 2013 experts on my scalp and have been massively massively impressed but i've noticed one HUUUUGE flaw, no brace means no mudguard and i'm getting a face full of mud. living in possibly the wettest part of the northern hemisphere or so it seems, whilse also been short sighted and having to ride in glasses this is becoming a massive problem.
    Can anyone recommend a mudhuard to work with the dorados?

    i tried posting pics but i dont have enough post yet.

  42. #42
    RideDirt
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    Mud always tastes so good...ha ha ha ... Hmmm I would love to try one of these forks out! DVO and X-Fusion are sleeping .

  43. #43
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    Does THE still make those mud guards that attach at the bottom of the steerer tube?

  44. #44
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    I have heard of someone making a small guard that attaches to the bottom of the steerer tube like what MartinS said. I do not think there is anything like Mucky Nutz available for the fork. You will have to come up with some other idea. I am in the process of thinking of one now.

    -Brett
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  45. #45
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    Yeah its looking like the THE moto style fender is the only viable option. It just looks a bit too late 90's but i suppose their pretty cheap.

  46. #46
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    For Dorado mud guard, check out the Crud Fast Fender.

    MTB | Crud-products

  47. #47
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    I dont like the looks of that one at all or how it mounts. I have been toying with a few ideas on a mud guard with my Dorado, but I have not had a chance to test it yet.

    -Brett
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  48. #48
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    A THE moto fender comes on and off really easily and works well. That's your ticket. You'll only have it on when you need it and won't mind the looks.
    Keep the Country country.

  49. #49
    RideDirt
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    So how about an update for all of you that got your forks in ? Some time has passed Lets get some pix in here too !

  50. #50
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    I've had mine since 2012 but I did just get it back from my free Hayes service and rode it at Angel Fire, NM last weekend. Feels the same, still no problems. But I did try running it with 10psi less than last year and it felt super smooth. I didn't feel it bottom out but I used up 90% of the travel on a blue run. I set it up 5 psi (still 5 lower than last year) so it wouldn't bottom on jumps or double black rocks and it is a happy medium.

    Basically I threw out the sag setting measurement concept and went with what used the travel most efficiently for what I was riding. It really doesn't have a noticeable bottom out compared to the "thunk" my 888 did.
    You have just been mentally Rick Roll'd. Yup you're thinking about it right now aren't you? Don't fight it.

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