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  1. #1
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    Reputation: LarryFahn's Avatar
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    I'm thinking 2012 888 rc3 evo ti, but...

    My shop just got in a 2012 888 rc3 EVO ti and I'm really liking it even though I wanted a Fox 40. I've never seen a 40 come back and rarely hear of any issues with them. The thing is that the 888 looks really nice and feels real good too. Not that I've ridden it, but the typical rundown of adjusting the rebound and compression and messing around with it in the shop, it feels good. My 2007 888 rc2x was an awesome fork and I never once questioned how hard I could ride that thing. But being 250-275lbs, I really need the reassurance when I want to do a drop. I never questioned my old fork, but I felt it has seen it's life expectancy. Again though, the 40 is still in my sights. I've had 3 buddy's ride them for years and still love them. Fox doesn't have to change their fork every year or come up with a new name for the same thing. Plus my 36 TALAS is the perfect fork for my Remedy and I've never had an issue with that fork either. I hate to bring it up, but I think about the RBR when the rider bailed and the fork hit the dirt transition and broke without him on the bike. I realize I'm not Cam Zink, but I also need a fork that will last another 5 years, and will not make me hesitate on hitting a drop and wonder if I'm going to faceplant into the stanchions. I'm a typical at Platty and Mtn Creek. Rockgardens are my home and 6-7' drops are my favorites. Does anyone have input or sugestions? Thanks, Fahn

  2. #2
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    the 888 is legit, just get it

  3. #3
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    888 you'll be set! I'm 200lbs and my 888 never let me down. You can see my pics of 15' drops on my page.

    "Dream like you'll live forever, but live like you'll die today."
    -James Dean

  4. #4
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    There's a chance you'd like the Zocchi even more than the Fox. Both are pretty beefy, 38mm and 40mm for the Marz and Fox respectively, so flex shouldn't be an issue. In terms of feel, I love my 2012 Fox 40. It's very supple on the small stuff with good support in all phases of travel, and the adjustments offer a wide range of real tuneability. I haven't tried any of the new Marz stuff, but word is that they are as smooth and tuneable as the Fox, with firmer mid-stroke support on the 2012 stuff. Where the Marz may win out is in maintenance. My 2012 40 has been very easy to keep up. Just a few oil changes and seal lubes per season without any major issues. However, I hear the 888s run buttery smooth all season without much maintenance at all. I can't attest to this myself, and it's probably a good idea to break your fork down on occasion, but it does seem like 888s have longer service intervals.

  5. #5
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    ^^^ What he said. I weigh about 170lbs, probably close to 190lbs with armor and pack and all. Been riding on a 2010 888 RCV since last July without any serious issues (one of the bolt's heads in the top crown broke off, but that's it). I generally like to go big, overshoot stuff, and am not the smoothest rider. Additionally, this fork went through a season of being on a Whistler resort rental bike. I can say I fully trusted it.

    A couple months ago I got the 2012 888 Evo V2 fork and have been super stoked. The biggest difference for me besides it being lighter, and more plush and responsive is that they made it more progressive so I can run the fork softer while not experiencing any harsh bottom outs. In fact, I have yet to feel a hard bottom out like I used to on the old fork once in a while and I've been riding the same trails as I always do.

    Anyway, I've been really stoked on this fork and have full trust in it. Maintenance is lower than other brands, which is always a big plus for me. It's up to you to decide now, but I doubt you'd go wrong either way.

  6. #6
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    Reputation: KillingtonVT's Avatar
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    I was always a Marz guy until the bad years. I strayed in 2010 and rode a 40 that season. The 40 felt great, I just didn't like changing my seals every couple of weekends. (Fox seemed to have remedied this after they flipped the cartridge upside down). I was back on Marz last year with the 888 Evo Ti and was happy to be back "home". (The lack of mid stroke support didn't really effect me as I threw in a stiffer spring to give my bike more POP).

    I pushed quite a few personal boundaries last year with going big and definitely had more than my share of crashes. I never had an issue with my Evo Ti with over 50 days of riding last season.

    In short, both forks are REALLY good, but the low maintenance of Marz wins for me!

  7. #7
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    Reading all these reviews makes me more ambitious about ordering mine next Friday, can't wait to get it installed and broken in.

  8. #8
    Look at the time!
    Reputation: lelebebbel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KillingtonVT View Post
    The 40 felt great, I just didn't like changing my seals every couple of weekends. (Fox seemed to have remedied this after they flipped the cartridge upside down).
    The 2012 SKF seals did that trick for the 40s. They seem solid, and have less friction. Can be retrofitted to all 40s.

    One advantage of the 40 is that basically all the parts are backwards compatible all the way to the earliest models, with the exception of the dampers. Makes it really easy to source spares etc.
    That being said, the new 888s look awesome, and if I could've gotten one for a similar price than my 40s, I don't know what I would've done. I think you can't go wrong either way.
    wanted: Cannondale Lefty w/ V-brake studs

  9. #9
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    Another nice thing about the 888 is it felt good pretty much right off the bat. I'm still breaking it in a bit I think, but I've enjoyed it since day one. My friend has a new 40 and his feels like crap until he breaks it in more. The cost effectiveness of the 888 was another selling point for me. The Ti model definitely costs quite a bit, but the regular one is pretty reasonable for what you get.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by genemk View Post
    Another nice thing about the 888 is it felt good pretty much right off the bat. I'm still breaking it in a bit I think, but I've enjoyed it since day one. My friend has a new 40 and his feels like crap until he breaks it in more. The cost effectiveness of the 888 was another selling point for me. The Ti model definitely costs quite a bit, but the regular one is pretty reasonable for what you get.
    I think these are good points. My 2012 40 took a few days (about 7-9 hrs riding time) at the bike park to get nicely broken in. I was initially disappointed with the performance, changed the oil, lubed the seals, fiddled with the dials, and continued to be disappointed when it didn't feel any better. However, I eventually had an aha moment when everything came together. The non-ti 888 is a really sweet fork. Minus the weight differential, it has the exact same performance as its titanium sibling, and it's way cheaper.

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