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  1. #1
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    i9 fr/dh vs dt swiss 440 fr/dh

    what do you think is better first of all, a 32 hole hub and rim or a 36 hole hub and rim. does it really make a difference in strenght. so with that said. go with a i9 32 dh hub laced to a mavic ex 823 rim or a dt swiss 36 hole hub laced to a ex 823 rim. does the 32 have less strenght then the 36 hole. hopefully you guys understand my question
    thanks.
    maxibrobro

  2. #2
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    32 hole setup by a good wheel builder should be plenty strong enough

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by brillantesdv
    32 hole setup by a good wheel builder should be plenty strong enough
    this is true
    ....but I still like the 36.......and I wouldn't get an I9........might want to try Hadleys and 823's been running those for 6 years plus
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    this is true
    ....but I still like the 36.......and I wouldn't get an I9........might want to try Hadleys and 823's been running those for 6 years plus
    why not I9's?
    '08 Turner DHR

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackwater racing1013
    why not I9's?

    weak......buddy's folded in a turn
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  6. #6
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    Come to think of it, I own all three, LOL (340 tho, not the 440 DT)!

    I9
    The good: bling factor and BEST engagement.
    The bad: bearings are VERY average, very noisy and rolling resistance is PATHETIC!

    DT
    The good: Reliable and relatively quiet. Smooth rolling.
    The bad: Engagement? What's that??? If you ride skinnies and ladders... MOVE ALONG!

    Hadley
    The good: Reliable, quiet, very strong, roll and roll with amazingly low rolling resistance, excellent engagement (not quite as good as I9 but close enough).
    The bad: Have to service a little more often than a normal hub if you wash your bike a lot.

    For a change I'm with SMT all the way on this one.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Last edited by Gman086; 07-03-2009 at 10:34 AM.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    weak......buddy's folded in a turn
    How did his hub fold? =P I thought rims folded lol.

    The OP said I9 hub laced to 823s, not I9 rims

    And did your friend have the right spoke tensions and were they laced right? I know its silly to ask but a friend of mine has I9's laced to I9s and he beats this shiz out of them and they are still rolling tru.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    weak......buddy's folded in a turn
    If they folded ina turn, they weren't tensioned properly. End of story. Hard to blame a product that isn't upkept properly.
    Stuff.

  9. #9
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    at one point i9 was using their own spokes threaded into the hub. I would certainly avoid that setup.

    the 440 hubs are incredibly easy to service.

  10. #10
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    I9s roll great but they take a lot of maintenence. I had to change the front bearings and rebuild the rear hub after 3 months of riding in WET/WINTER conditions. I do love the wheels though.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by spxoo
    at one point i9 was using their own spokes threaded into the hub. I would certainly avoid that setup.

    the 440 hubs are incredibly easy to service.
    Their wheelsets come with the AL spokes threaded into the hubs, they also sell traditional j bend spoke hubs.

  12. #12
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    i break sh%t, ride hard, are the i9s strong enough ever with 32 hole. i weigh 220

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxibrobro
    i break sh%t, ride hard, are the i9s strong enough ever with 32 hole. i weigh 220
    210 lbs-ish here. I've had two sets of I9's with the aluminum spokes (sold one pair though) and have had really positive experiences with them both. They really are noticeably stiffer than a good set of J-spoke wheels and noticeably lighter than a similar wheel with J-spokes. They are more sensitive to rocks getting kicked into the spokes and uneven spoke tension. But just like every design out there, there are strengths and weaknesses. You just need to choose where your priorities are (light weight and fast engagement or durability and non proprietary) and that should make your decision pretty clear.
    A trail thatís too difficult wouldnít exist because itíd never be used. But, trails can exist thatíre too difficult for you.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by specializedbeta18
    How did his hub fold? =P I thought rims folded lol.

    The OP said I9 hub laced to 823s, not I9 rims

    And did your friend have the right spoke tensions and were they laced right? I know its silly to ask but a friend of mine has I9's laced to I9s and he beats this shiz out of them and they are still rolling tru.

    strait tensioned from a factory worker......and spokes gave out.....evidently it is a common problem
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    strait tensioned from a factory worker......and spokes gave out.....evidently it is a common problem

    Here we go again......

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1soulrider
    Here we go again......

    whole post about it here and pinkbike and ride monkey had some stuff too
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  17. #17
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    thanks nickle

  18. #18
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    I have 2 pairs of I9 that have been holding up well (AM set for 3 years, FR set for 2 years) - my biggest issue with them is the factory bearings are (were) mediocre.

    I weigh in at ~ 200lbs fully geared up (15lb pack)

  19. #19
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    Of course their bearings suck. You're paying 1g for the technology. Not for proper execution.

  20. #20
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    whole post about it here and pinkbike and ride monkey had some stuff too
    gee willikers...if its on the internet it must be gospel, with no other facts worth noting do you rely on wikepedia to understand all dem big werdz people are using on mtbr?

  21. #21
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Of course their bearings suck. You're paying 1g for the technology. Not for proper execution.
    you suck

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    gee willikers...if its on the internet it must be gospel, with no other facts worth noting do you rely on wikepedia to understand all dem big werdz people are using on mtbr?
    ]

    fact is they broke at a point other rims are stronger.....their price is too high for this amount of flaws
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  23. #23
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    I think they likely have to use better bearings, as it's apparent they aren't using the best ones they can. Tony Ellsworth uses bearings in his wheels that have more balls and they also happen to be bigger balls.

    As far as the spokes go, no one is bound to them. They work for some, but the criteria for others is not the same. For that, they have the classic. The only problem with the classics are is that they aren't light for the price.

    DT will be doing 36 points soon, and it will likely be retrofittable star ratchets. Hadley and King are alternatives as well.

    The nice thing about the DT system is that it's simple to work on (most in this class are anyhow), few moving parts, and when engaged, it's a solid locking of parts, nearly as if they were one.

    Basically, here's what servicing the engagement mech would look like. I purposely didn't write any text because it's all self-explanatory. This is from my girlfriend's 240. I blended a light, slick automotive type grease with a small amount of a slick teflon-containing grease. No need to overdo it, either. Also make sure to get some grease in the labyrinth grooves for better sealing and water resistance. Conceptually, the Star Ratchet System is similar to King's concept. Execution is completely different.

    The hubs are three years old, have thousands of miles and a half dozen countries on them. They still look pretty new inside. That's what one can expect. The last time I cleaned and serviced them, it was 2006, after about six months just to see what was up. The innards were still clean this time around.










    Honestly, I9 is nice, there's that engagement point thing, but if I had to, it would be the DT, even at lower POE.
    Last edited by Jerk_Chicken; 07-03-2009 at 02:09 AM.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    ]

    fact is they broke at a point other rims are stronger.....their price is too high for this amount of flaws
    What amount of flaws?

    Are you trying to compare online reviews?

    I got news for you....

    Online reviews arent a good way to quantify failure/success ratios.

  25. #25
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    I've got I9s on the downhill bike and no problems. Monitoring spoke tension (with a tensiometer) is pretty important...loose spokes could lead to catastrophic results I imagine. They are a little bit fiddly to get the right bearing compression on the rear hub...there is an adjustment and too tight will lead to freehub drag, too loose will be just that. They are seriously light and very quick engagement, but also seem a bit, ummm, minimalist in their design...more like what you'd expect for a XC hubset than a DH hubset. I wouldn't recommend them to a 220 guy who breaks sh_t, not because of any bad experience, just because after living with them and fiddling with them, they don't give me the impression that they are overly robust.

    In the end, wheelsets on DH bikes take a thrashing and need to be easily serviceable (i.e. spoke replacement). If I were to do it again, I would get a cheaper more conventional wheelset to beat the tar out of. Yeah, maybe DT swiss or Hadley.

    By the way, 36 recommended for more lateral strength...but will not reduce dinks and eggs.

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