• 01-04-2013
    2FUELS
    I will not ask this question...
    But I will admit that I want to progress in my jumping skillz and add some style to the relatively straight air I'm doing now. I've spent the last 15 years riding clipped in and I've got a shiny new set of flats and shoes ready to go...I am scared spitless.

    Heels down-check
    Ass off the back-check
    Start small-check
    Nut up-work in progress

    Anything else?
  • 01-04-2013
    .WestCoastHucker.
    find a spot to build a jump or two. build it up, ride. build bigger, ride more. repeat...

    nothing will teach you the dynamics of jumping more than making your own jump to progress on. as you build, you will realize what the shape of a jump does to you in the air and how to fix it(if it needs fixing). after you do this enough times, you will eventually master the skill. i've done this enough times to be able to look at any jump and know what kind of speed i will need and how it's going to throw me and how to correct any weirdness long before i even attempt the jump....
  • 01-04-2013
    2FUELS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    find a spot to build a jump or two. build it up, ride. build bigger, ride more. repeat...

    nothing will teach you the dynamics of jumping more than making your own jump to progress on. as you build, you will realize what the shape of a jump does to you in the air and how to fix it(if it needs fixing). after you do this enough times, you will eventually master the skill. i've done this enough times to be able to look at any jump and know what kind of speed i will need and how it's going to throw me and how to correct any weirdness long before i even attempt the jump....

    I've built a complete jump trail and I am always upgrading/adding to it, for the past two years its evolved into an animal all its own. For no other reason than "I want to" my plan is to ditch the SPD's and go to flats (its been 30 years since my bmx days) I've gotten extremely lazy being clipped in as the bike is always under me but style is hard to get without moving your feet around a little bit, nothing is worse than a one legged lander when you accidently un-clip in mid air. I want to free up the feet, but I think i've got a long learning (or un-learning) curve ahead of me.
  • 01-04-2013
    pizon
    so just repeat the same progression you went through? I might suggest slowing down the rebound a bit, i think getting "bucked" coming off a lip is a bit easier with flats (at least for me, but then again i ride with non specific shoes)
  • 01-04-2013
    cgjeff
    We have two riders in our group that have ridden nothing but clips for years. We are now doing more jumping and freeriding and both of them have opted to try flats. Fortunately, they purchased good pedals and Five Ten shoes, making the transition a bit easier

    Last weekend was the first ride and they both struggled. No big wrecks, but plenty of comments about lifting their feet off the pedals hitting jumps and drops. By the end of the day though, both of them made were very happy they made the switch. They will definitely ride clipless on our XC/traditional rides, but are becoming much more comfortable on Flats on the jump/downhill stuff.

    As said above, it's just practice... practice... practice.
  • 01-04-2013
    ronnyg801
    Learn how to bunny hop well without clips again, and be able to tuck the bike to your butt... very easy can be done in your driveway or street, takes little time here and there but keeping the bike with you on flats will become second nature.
  • 01-04-2013
    2FUELS
    1 Attachment(s)
    This is one of my babies, done correctly its smooth as glass. Practice Practice Practice is right, theres enough hang time here for a wicked whip (if I had the skill) which is mostly the reason I want to develope some flat pedal ride time...
  • 01-04-2013
    cgjeff
    ^^^ Impressive!!
  • 01-04-2013
    kenbentit
    Looks fun! Coming up short is def. NOT an option ;) I got comfortable with flats mainly by using them for trail rides. Made it very easy when I started jumping.
  • 01-04-2013
    mbell
    Simple plan on keeping your feet on the pedals-

    Rear foot is always toe down.
    Front foot is always heal down.

    By doing this, you can put pressure against your pedals in wedge and keep control of your bike in the air without your feet coming free.
  • 01-04-2013
    csermonet
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mbell View Post
    Simple plan on keeping your feet on the pedals-

    Rear foot is always toe down.
    Front foot is always heal down.

    By doing this, you can put pressure against your pedals in wedge and keep control of your bike in the air without your feet coming free.

    Highly advise against dropping your toes in any situation. Last thing you want is to get your toes crushed against rocks, roots, or a landing. VERY poor advice. I've never ridden clipless, but keeping my feet on the pedals in the air has never been a problem. This is way too much thinking to be doing for something that will come naturally. Not to mention unsafe.

    As mentioned before, doing some trail riding with your flats will greatly improve your technique. If you can become proficient on flats, which is not hard and will come naturally with enough seat time, you should be able to be just as efficient as you are with clips. Unless you a World Cup/Olympic level rider, the benefits of clips are not that drastic IMHO
  • 01-04-2013
    motochick
    Not to be picky, but your ass shouldn't "be off the back". You should be centered and balanced. Low, yes....off the back, no. Have fun in your new adventure! I just got my first BXM bike and I am hoping that learning how to really ride it well will make me a better overall rider.
  • 01-04-2013
    mbell
    Keep the pedal under the ball of your foot, not in the arch. Also, you are keeping your feet in the 9&3 position, thus minimizing the chance of a toe strike.
    This is good info, as taught by the pros.
  • 01-04-2013
    csermonet
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mbell View Post
    Keep the pedal under the ball of your foot, not in the arch. Also, you are keeping your feet in the 9&3 position, thus minimizing the chance of a toe strike.
    This is good info, as taught by the pros.

    Incorrect info yet again. You run on the balls of your feet, and that is not the same motion as pedaling. When putting power into the pedals you are not looking to propel yourself forward, that is what using the balls of your feet is for. All you are doing is forcing the pedal down and away from you, much like squatting. Do you stand on the balls of your feet when you squat? No. The area between the ball and arch should be centered over the pedal's axle. Sounds like you both need to read some real flat pedal literature. This is the best, and is written as a guide for riders coming off clip less pedals.

    http://www.bikejames.com/wp-content/...withLinks2.pdf

    The statement about being centered and not hanging off the back is partially false as well. Depends on what you are trying to achieve and what the portion of trail is like. You definitely want to have a more rearward biased position on flats at all times than compared to clipless. And even more so on a steep section. It's not uncommon for me to have my rear tire touch my ass and groin.
  • 01-04-2013
    mbell
    There you go 2FUELS- read the bible of pedal work and you too will be a pro! When you're done, write up the cliff notes for me... I'll be getting fit for my prosthetic toes in my doctors office.
  • 01-04-2013
    csermonet
    Lolol go watch every video and write up ever written for flat pedal technique. Not once does anyone reccomend dropping your toes or using the ball of your feet. Technique is all personal choice and opinion, just giving advice from personal experience I have benefit from.
  • 01-04-2013
    kenbentit
    I do have to agree with NOT dropping your toes. I've had a few nasty toe smashes from doing that, not a good way to end a ride...
  • 01-04-2013
    csermonet
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kenbentit View Post
    I do have to agree with NOT dropping your toes. I've had a few nasty toe smashes from doing that, not a good way to end a ride...

    I went off a little step down into a roots section and smashed my rear foot's toes into a nasty root. Ended up losing my big toe nail haha
  • 01-04-2013
    aedubber
    Yea make sure your body is centered lol , i learned the hard way and dead sailored lol .. Cost me a separated R ac and 3 fractures to my scapula , 6 months of physical therapy and fat lol . Im all good now , back on a bike again. I def got too comfy on the trails and too confident , easily can happen . Cant wait to get back tho !
  • 01-07-2013
    jval83
    Try to remove anything solid around you and you should be fine
  • 01-07-2013
    mykel
    Toes down - no. yes it can be of benefit in some situations, but its too easy to slip or catch a toe. Experience talking here...
    As for balls of the feet - that is how I learned to ride. Now I ride just a smidge aft of true ball of foot, but not as far back as some recommenced. I am not comfortable as I loose the range of motion I have become accustomed to after 40+ years on the bike. Riding just a bit back of ball of foot allows quite a lot of ankle rotation allowing you to really drop your heels when required, as well as giving lots of range of motion to keep the bike oriented how you wish.

    michael
  • 01-07-2013
    2FUELS
    Looking forward to the time when its instinctive again!
  • 01-07-2013
    fryed_1
    Alcohol and chicks...

    Alcohol gives you the courage to try something bigger.

    Hot chicks means you're not going to be as quick to chicken out and show off more than you would without. Combine this option with alcohol and you'll either nail the biggest jump or biggest hospital bill ever (possibly both in the same run!)
  • 01-07-2013
    2FUELS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fryed_1 View Post
    Alcohol and chicks...

    Alcohol gives you the courage to try something bigger.

    Hot chicks means you're not going to be as quick to chicken out and show off more than you would without. Combine this option with alcohol and you'll either nail the biggest jump or biggest hospital bill ever (possibly both in the same run!)

    This is how I dislocated my right shoulder BTW...:thumbsup:
  • 01-07-2013
    Josie7
    don't forgot to pre-load the lip of the jump.. that forces the bike to rise up to your body off the jump and helps stick to your feet.

    good pedals and shoes and you shouldn't have a problem, I can't remember the last time I slipped a pedal, 5.10's are sticky..