Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    33

    how to get into downhill.

    Hello every one i am looking to get into downhill riding and i have no idea how to start. Where to get a bike (well i can figure that one out). But witch ones best for me; where to ride and where to learn.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    108
    It would be best if we knew a bit about your riding history. Have you ridden a bike before? If so what type of riding? (road, cross country, etc.)

    Once you answer these it will be easier for us to direct you to a good starting point

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    33
    I am an ok cross country rider. And yes i have ridden a bike before. My only problem is that where i ride you have to ride up the hills to go down them so i was looking at an all moutian bike.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    60
    you ride down mountains...and if something is in your way you run over it

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    318
    Well I think it really depends on what you want to do. An all mountain (AM) bike will allow you to, like you said, ride up then have fun riding down. However, a downhill (DH) bike will really only allow you to go down the mountain. I know some people say you can ride a DH bike up but, for the love of God, don't do that to yourself, just buy and AM bike if you want to climb.

    What does you budget look like?

    It may be good for you to start with an AM bike and see how much you like the DH aspects of riding, high speed, bigger rock gardens, jumps, steeps, etc before you jump full into a DH bike. They are really only made for one purpose and an AM bike gives you much more flexibility.

    A DH bike is a tool designed for a very specific task and isn't too great at anything else.
    An AM bike is more jack of trades, master of none. It won't excel at XC or DH but it can do both decently well, well enough at least to let you know which you like more.

    Hope that helps.

    If you want more specific advice about bikes, let us know more about your budget, location of riding, experience, etc.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    644
    Look at the 6 and 7 inch bikes that can handle a 2x setup. You'll want that granny gear for climbing. An adjustable fork will help out as well.

    You can climb with an 8" bike (I know some guys who will clear stuff that makes the 9er crowd jealous) but you've gotta have a lot of skill and the legs to do it.
    Just another redneck with a bike

  7. #7
    e.f.f.e.c.t smoothoperatr
    Reputation: themarsvolta55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    2,303
    you watch this to get into DH



    Roost DH - Ben Reid on Vimeo





  8. #8

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    169
    I am in a similar situation. The bikes I have been looking at have been the Transition Blindside. Comes with a front derailleur and the front and rear suspension are adjustable from 7-8". The Banshee Scythe is even more adjustable I believe, also FD compatible, but is a little more pricey. For forks, I am looking for something in the 170-180mm range. I still have to sell my All Mountain rig before I get into all that. You wouldn't be interested in a lightly used 2011 BMC TrailFox01 would you?
    Leftys creep me out

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    169
    I am also looking at the Norco Truax. Add that to the list as well.
    Leftys creep me out

  10. #10
    A guy who loves to DH
    Reputation: foulhabits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    83
    I got a hard tail junker and rode it until i felt like i was better and then stripped it to its frame and added all the parts to my liking. I started to notice i hated climbing. So i started to walk my bike up hills then go down them really fast. My chain would fall off. So i bought a chain guide and continued to do downhill on my hard tail/free-rider beater bike. Then started to get into doing more drops and jumps and bought a larger fork with more travel. I realized i am a downhill rider and hated any other riding because i didn't find it fun. So i got my first downhill rig and continued to ride downhill with growing skills on every ride i went on. There also is no shuttling and all of the terrain where i live, the only way to go down it, is to climb it. (mind you i walk my bikes up) So here are some things to look at:

    1. Do you like climbing up on your bike?
    2. If you don't like climbing, do you mind walking your bike up?
    3. Does your area have enough downhill type terrain for you to progress your DH skills?
    4. Would you consider driving or going to more DH type terrain?
    5. Finally the most important question, Do you mind crashing and banging yourself up from time to time?

  11. #11
    Professional Troll
    Reputation: Gemini2k05's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,899
    And none of you have asked where he lives, which is probably the most important part of a DH/AM bike selection.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by pablo4429 View Post

    If you want more specific advice about bikes, let us know more about your budget, location of riding, experience, etc.
    Ya huh, i did too!! haha

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    145
    I love downhill but have to pedal for my down too, I went with a Specialized Enduro, Which I just raced in the Sea Otter Classic 2012 Dh Cat 2 for my first time ever racing, I beat all the Cat 3 times, and I slid out in the off camber right hander and still got 13th out of 30 plus guys in my cat. You dont have to have 8 inches to get into DH. A lot of guys out there were probabyl hurt time wise because the suspension slowed them down, just my 2 cents. Get a 6-7 inch travel bike with a 2x10 setup and ride the heck out of it first, then once you have someone to shuttle you all the time worry about 8 plus travel.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Johnny No.5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    399
    Nobody HAS to ride up, that's just silly. I only push up and honestly couldn't even ride up the trails I do anyway. Everything that can be ridden up can be pushed up wih a bigger bike and hauled down faster on said bigger bike. As long as you've ende up at the top then you've "earned the downs", never let anyone tell you differently.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny No.5 View Post
    Nobody HAS to ride up, that's just silly. I only push up and honestly couldn't even ride up the trails I do anyway. Everything that can be ridden up can be pushed up wih a bigger bike and hauled down faster on said bigger bike. As long as you've ende up at the top then you've "earned the downs", never let anyone tell you differently.
    I agree and disagree. My local trails, require a lot of going up, and than back down. The way the trails are, lots of tight, tight switch backs, a 5-6 inch bike would be faster going down.

    A lot of the XC guys that don't have the sac, or the skills to ride DH, are the guys that tell people "you gotta earn your turns." I paid for a lift ticket dude, I earned them. Hate when I hear those words..

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    10
    I should advise to buy somtething very strong...

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Urb-dirt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    50
    Can you build and set up a trails/all mountain bike to be better suited for DH/free ride? How and what would it take?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    453
    Quote Originally Posted by HelloMyNameIsSean View Post

    A lot of the XC guys that don't have the sac, or the skills to ride DH, are the guys that tell people "you gotta earn your turns." I paid for a lift ticket dude, I earned them. Hate when I hear those words..
    Nicely said... I totally agree, sac up and lets see you hit a 20 foot gap..haha (and i didn't mean you, but the XC weenies..)

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    238
    I might as well be an XC weenie, because I'm not hitting a 20 foot gap lol

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    145
    yeah its called a specialzed enduro evo, or a trek scratch i believe. (build a all mountain for freeride)

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: shwinn8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,897
    cheapest thing i can think of is take a chairlift to the top and bomb down on what ever bike you have.. it's less expensive than buying a new bike just to learn you don't like they type of riding
    '11 Jedi
    '01 Straight8
    '01Rocket88< ran over it.. always do a full walk around!
    '00 Homegrown

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •