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  1. #1
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    The highest standard chest / spine / rib protection

    So while researching CE level 1 & 2 certifications, I ran across a back protector post on a forum detailing the requirements for level 3 gear. What sport you ask would require such stringent certs that even motorcycling gear doesn't match?

    Horse riding.

    I was shocked to see the different lineup of vests AND shoulder armor for this sport and one in particular stood out. Most of the vests were in the range of $200, and shoulder cups (which also meet level 3 for superior collarbone protection) were up to $80, but this vest came in at a whopping $570-800. It meets the BETA 2000 level 3 standard (which has been superseded by 2009), and offers a level of "crush protection" using a magnesium ribcage design. Here are some pictures with a related article stating the company was supposed to go out of business in 2008 or 9, but their website is still up and displaying their armor. I was also surprised to find out that KNOX has partnered with a company that makes women only armor with what looks like a neck and shoulder protection system. I'll post that below this one.

    EXO BODY PROTECTOR

    A first of its kind, the Exo consists of a dual system designed to protect against impact and some crushing injuries, when a rider is thrown or falls from a horse. It has been extensively tested and meets BETA 2000 Level 3 and EN13158:2000, the highest safety standard available.

    • Shoulder tab - open to access hinge bolts
    • Shoulder pad - internal adjustable shoulder pad for comfortable and secure fit
    •Shoulder straps - adjustable floating shoulder straps for individual fitting requirements
    •Breathable Flexotech foam - PVC nitrile foam casing around Exo-skeleton. Highly impact absorbent and moulds to rider for comfort
    •Exo-skeleton
    extremely strong internal ‘ribcage’ constructed from magnesium alloy
    •Waistband - fully adjustable internal waistband for secure fit
    •Contoured tail section - to protect lower back
    •Ergonomic design - for freedom of movement and flexibility
    •Reflective piping and logos - located on front and back for safety
    •Mesh lining - to wick away moisture
    •Outer cover - hard wearing 600 denier polyester with water repellent properties
    •Allen Key - located on the side flaps beneath green first aid cross - cut for access to undo shoulder bolts



    Forgive the spelling erros on this site. I provide the link since it has zoomable photos. http://www.equestriancollections.com...upcode=TO80064

    Exo Bodycage body protector faces an uncertain future

    Abigail Butcher, H&H news editor
    12 September, 2008

    The Exo BodyCage was designed by engineer Matthew Asprey after he witnessed the fatal fall of Simon Long at Burghley in 1999.

    Mr Asprey and his business partner Mr Kirk spent £1million developing the concept, and sold a licence to Woof Wear to manufacture the finished product.
    The body protector went on sale in 2005, but was greeted with caution by some doctors.

    "Hyperextension of the neck [whiplash] is what doctors are worried about," said Ted Adams, of Doctors at Events, a company that provides medical assistance on cross-country courses. "That, and how long it takes to get someone out [of an Exo in an emergency]."

    But Woof Wear told H&H that although sales have been disappointing, people have credited the Exo BodyCage with saving their lives. The most recent of these was Katie Hamer, who was airlifted to hospital after a rotational fall during the novice class at Spring Hill Horse Trials, Gloucestershire, on 25 August. Three weeks later, with only bruises and a broken wrist, she told H&H she was lucky to be alive.

    "The horse I was riding went head-over-heels over the first jump," said Katie, 41. "Doctors have told me that, if I wasn't wearing the Exo BodyCage, I wouldn't be alive today."

    In 2005, event rider Lisa Bray said she would "never ride cross-country without an Exo again" after walking away from a rotational fall at Milton Keynes Equestrian Centre. But on 17 September, the BodyCage company will cease to exist. Exasperated by what they term as "antagonism" towards the product, Mr Kirk and Mr Asprey are donating the patent to the RDA.
    The photos with the background were taken from a classified listing at http://www.virginiaequestrian.com/ma...=view&ID=54685
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  2. #2
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    Kan Teq body protector

    New body protector for lady riders
    5 February, 2008



    The Kan Teq body protector is the first moulded equestrian body protector made exclusively for women.

    Designed in conjunction with sportswear expert Knox — maker of top-of-the-range motorcycle protectors — Kan Teq has produced a unique, strong and light moulded foam panel protection system.

    According to the manufacturer, it offers comfort, flexibility, safety and style. It hugs the waist, chest, back and bust and curves into the small of the back. The shoulder pad is designed to protect a particularly vulnerable area.

    As well as the many colours available, the Kan Teq protector features reflective logos and piping to aid visibility. There are six adjustment points for optimal fit and the fabric is Tencel-coated for stain resistance, stretch — so the protector moves with the body — and waterproofing.

    On impact, the tiny air pockets in the outer skin of the foam panels help absorb the force of the fall. The protector conforms with all the requirements of BETA 2000, Body Protector Class 3 and meets standard EN13158:2000.

    Who uses it?

    International eventer Polly Jackson has been trialling the Kan Teq in her "off season" and she plans to compete in it in the spring.

    "It's a bit more modern in shape and material — a bit like the sort of thing trail bikers wear," says Polly, who chose a metallic-coloured version. "I have tried some back protectors in the past which have made me feel like a robot, but this one is definitely less clumpy.

    "I suppose it's like wearing a Burberry jacket rather than one from the high street — it's stylish with a bit more technicality about it."

    Young eventer Izzy Taylor adds: "This is the first body protector I have worn which I can really breathe in."

    Where can I get one?

    It comes in four sizes — from the small teenager to the "full bodied" woman — and in seven colours. Price: £225 Tel: 02897 542313 www.kanteq.com - video clip on this site, just couldn't figure out how to embed it in the post.
    Last edited by bcdale; 08-21-2010 at 10:03 PM.
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  3. #3
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    Jack Ellis

    Here's one from a Scottish company that also supplies bulletproof vests / personal protection. It has a zipper less front which I prefer more since it does not allow any gap in protection for the chest.


    PRO VEST
    Whatever size or shape, the Jack Ellis Pro Vest provides a higher level of protection for the more professional rider but with maximum style – every detail has been given the utmost consideration to allow you to concentrate on your riding, not your body protection!


    FEATURES

    1. Detachable tail section
    2. Reinforced webbing straps double back through D rings for additional security
    3. Fully adjustable waist belt
    4. Double layer of perforated foam protection.

    1. The Pro Vest has been manufactured to comply with: EN13158:2000 in Level 3
    2. BETA Safety Standard for Horse Riders Body and Shoulder Protectors (2000) in Level 3

    Interchangeable backs and fronts
    Allows for greater flexibility in fitting. Can be purchased separately in event of damage.

    Webbing shoulder straps and belts Provides greater adjustment and exact fit over the shoulder. Very secure fastening also allows sections to be removed separately in event of accidents or damage.

    Detachable tailpiece > Provides opportunity to fit perfect length overcoming the frustrating problem of vest catching the saddle.
    Softer and perforated foam > More flexibility and comfort and perforated foam helps with ventilation.
    Mesh lining > Breathable mesh aids ventilation.
    Wipe clean > Simply wipe clean.
    2 Year warranty > Peace of mind.

    http://www.jackellis.co.uk/equestrianprod_2.html

    SHOULDER PADS
    The Jack Ellis Shoulder Pads are manufactured from the same materials as the BETA Class 3 standard protector , providing greater protection to the shoulder area.

    (Claimed 80% reduction in collarbone injuries)
    Last edited by bcdale; 08-21-2010 at 09:45 PM.
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  4. #4
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    Zippa Body Protector

    Zippa Body Protector Range



    The Zippa Body Protector range from Airowear is designed to offer comfort and great fit to men, women and junior riders alike.

    The adjustable elastic side straps and zip fastenings allow a superb fit to be achieved. Using the latest high tech flexible foam inner features the unique "Airotech" ventilation system which ensures complete comfort for the rider, whilst offering maximum protection.

    Zippa Dynamic:
    Designed specifically for men, the dynamic is cut generously over the shoulders with masculine style.

    Zippa Dynamic Plus:

    The "Plus" has the addition of integral shoulder protectors giving ultimate protection without the added bulk. This garment is unique to Airoware.

    http://www.airowear.co.uk/body_protectors.php
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  5. #5
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    You forgot the most important thing..


    Weight & breathability?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3viltoast3r
    Weight & breathability?
    I'll have to go back and check, but from what I can remember they're obviously a bit heavier, maybe 1-4+ pounds. Most use the same foam as level 1 and 2 CE bike gear, there's just more in there. Some of them use the same breathable mesh lining as hockey shorts etc. Some I read are perforated which helps.

    One for Charles Owen states "The removable, machine washable cover is lined with CoolMax fabric, which is designed to wick moisture from your body, keeping you cool and dry."

    There are also jockey protectors which only go to level 1 and 400g, but even they protect the ribs better than any suit / chestpiece made for biking or those "football" type padded shirts from ***** sporting goods. I forgot to add some are even made to measure. Once you buy it you can't return it.

    RACESAFE JOCKEY VEST



    In development the Jockey Vest had to meet a strict criteria, it not only had to pass the relevant standards, it had to be light and comfortable to wear. Following extensive trials, a laminate of perforated foams, constructed in strips, proved the most suitable. The continual movement of up to seventy independently hinged, perforated foam sections, pump air through the channels and out through the net fabric, to make this one of the most comfortable garments available.
    As standard the RACESAFE Jockey Vest is supplied with a detachable Lycra crutch strap.
    Shoulder Pads and Leg Straps are available as optional extra’s.
    Last edited by bcdale; 08-21-2010 at 11:03 PM.
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  7. #7
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    Here's a Charles Owen Level 3 (bike shoulder armor only goes to level 1 equivalent) shoulder protector T-shirt being paired with what looks like the level 1 jockey vest above. They also have their own brand of vest.



    The Charles Owen Shoulder Protection Tee-shirt is a close fitting short sleeved top with in-built impact absorbing shaped and moulded shoulder pads. The shirts are suitable for all equestrian disciplines.

    * The shoulder protection shirt is made by Charles Owen and is tested to the highest safety standard EN13158:2000 Level 3.
    * It is made from breathable Coolmax material to wick sweat away from the skin.
    * The shirt allows total freedom of movement because of its unobtrusive nature.
    * Available in childrens and adult sizes, it comes in black only.

    http://www.treehouseonline.co.uk/product/9

    It seems a little on the expensive side, since you can get level 3 shoulder pads with Velcro for other vests for around $20-80.
    Last edited by bcdale; 08-22-2010 at 07:32 PM.
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  8. #8
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    would you rather get trampled on by a horse or a bike?

  9. #9
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    Its definitely interesting to see what kind of protection is available in other sports!

    Never considered that competitive horse riders needed serious body protection.
    Last edited by essenmeinstuff; 08-22-2010 at 03:21 PM.

  10. #10
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    Where does this stuff fit in?

    http://www.shockdoctor.com/products/impact-gear.aspx

    I've been wanting to try a few of their pieces but haven't seen or heard of any riders using it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    would you rather get trampled on by a horse or a bike?
    Neither. I've read of an idiot in a MX forum who had his bike come down on top of him after a face plant, and had his lungs and ribs all messed up. And while a MTB isn't as heavy, there are other factors that can release that same force or more on your body. You don't need to get the level 3 when level 1 is there as well and what all the biking stuff is built to except for some of the new back protectors at level 2, but they still don't have either chest or back that will protect the ribs like even a level 1 jockey vest will.


    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover
    Where does this stuff fit in?
    I had looked at their stuff a while ago and posted images for their 3+2 EXT compression shorts with the extended hip pad. I haven't gotten them since I came to a conclusion that it's just flimsy foam from regular football gear. The chest / rib protector I posted a image to a while ago also. It looks interesting, but I doubt will measure up to these equestrian vests which have passed EU testing and are industry wide adopted and proven.

    I had been looking at Aerostich TF3 hip pads as well. While they don't have a CE rating, they claim it's due to the odd shape which restricts it being used in popular garments.

    I don't know how far one should need to got for level 1-3 for MTB considering it's not as dangerous as streetbiking, but with all the people complaining of shoulder injuries using level 1 CE, there's got to be an upgrade that's needed, and those shoulder pads appear to fir the bill for shoulder / collarbone, along with the shoulder padding of even the jockey vests.
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    That's the Knox armor I have (I even use their gloves- Recon). While it makes you feel less vulnerable it doesn't make you feel invincible since it's not really HARD shell plastic around padding. It's too flexible for my liking even with a level 1 CE. I've seen a youtube vid where a guy on the track crashed just using the chestpiece without the plastic cover like this all in 1 has, and he came away with just bruised internals, but no broken bones.

    What I am looking for is maybe combining the equestrian vests with the added lower abdominal and over the shoulder protection with the Knox Warrior which only overs the front upper half, and does not wrap around the ribcage or cover the entire back / shoulderblades like the vests do. The shoulder pads are removable thankfully, and I could replace them with the level 3 pads I posted above.
    Last edited by bcdale; 08-22-2010 at 07:30 PM.
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  14. #14
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    I wonder how well the equestrian vests would work with a neck brace. The Knox Warrior armor is supposed to be designed with this in mind. Do you wear Leatt or other neck brace with your Knox setup?

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    I haven't gotten around to getting the Leatt yet. I did get the BC9 which is meant for it. There's a new DBX brace for MTB riders, so I'm waiting for the verdict on that one over the one for motorbikes. I found an image on Leatts body armor suit made for their braces.



    The equestrian vests to me would be able to have a more snug fit since they are designed some of them to be MTM (made to measure), and their velcro shoulder system is more adjustable. The Knox armor and I think others have velcro or adjustment to bring the chestpiece higher or lower, but that doesn't necessarily cinch up the tightness over the shoulders. Some of these vests can also wrap around the ribs and kidneys just above the belly button; better protection than a kidney belt.
    MTBR review on the Hope skewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Get A Clue
    Weaknesses: Doesn't work when used incorrectly

  16. #16
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    I know this company used to make MTB vests. I still have one. Very protective and very hot. Cant fit a leatt with it. They made it under the Balfa company and under their won name..

    http://www.equineequip.com/vests.htm

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcdale
    Neither. I've read of an idiot in a MX forum who had his bike come down on top of him after a face plant, and had his lungs and ribs all messed up. And while a MTB isn't as heavy, there are other factors that can release that same force or more on your body. You don't need to get the level 3 when level 1 is there as well and what all the biking stuff is built to except for some of the new back protectors at level 2, but they still don't have either chest or back that will protect the ribs like even a level 1 jockey vest will.


    f=mv^2. your bike would have to hit you pretty fast to have the same force as a mx bike hitting you.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    f=mv^2. your bike would have to hit you pretty fast to have the same force as a mx bike hitting you.
    Funny thing is, that equation states that if you halve the mass, you only need to increase velocity by 1.4 (sqrt(2)) to have the same impact force.

    I still think its less likely for a lighter and by nature slower mtb to hit you with MORE speed than a MX to make up the same impact force, but the actual speed increase is the square root of the ratio of the weights (if that makes sense).

  19. #19
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    Try throwing your rib cage down on a sharp rock, upturned pedal or bar end. That might hurt as much as several hundred pounds of MX. The really scary equation is impact PSI, which as area approaches zero, force approaches infinite.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by essenmeinstuff View Post
    Funny thing is, that equation states that if you halve the mass, you only need to increase velocity by 1.4 (sqrt(2)) to have the same impact force.

    I still think its less likely for a lighter and by nature slower mtb to hit you with MORE speed than a MX to make up the same impact force, but the actual speed increase is the square root of the ratio of the weights (if that makes sense).

    lol yay math!
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

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  21. #21
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    In response to:

    f=mv^2 (completely assuming your talking forces here)

    That is wrong. In reality:

    f=mv^2/r

    if you're talking about a centripetal force. If you're talking kinetic energy, T, then:

    T=(1/2)mv^2

    Now, if you really want some food for thought, consider the total potential energy, U, as well. For a particle moving in an inverse square central force field (i.e., a mountain biker on Earth), this can include things like potential energy from getting some air time or spring potential energy being exerted between your shoulder and a tree during the impact. Next, I want you to consider a new quantity called the Lagrangian, L.

    L=T-U

    It will eventually allow us to examine the equations of motion for any particular part of one's body during a given scenario. That is the simple equation. Now, the cool part is that because we're going to ignore non-conservative forces (e.g. friction or stress) we can say that:

    d/dt(dL/(dq/dt))-dL/dq=0

    Here, a bit of calculus and problem solving is involved. But first, q represents one of the parameters that describes the state of the particle given its constraints. For example, if a particle is moving on a circular path, for example, ~an OTB crash, the q's are the radius, r, and angle of rotation, A. Thus, we can take the derivatives of each of these quantities (though note as an example that for a circle dr/dt=0) and plug them into above expressions (I'll let you figure out how as an exercise) to ultimately get some differential equations of motion that can be solved analytically for simpler problems, and numerically for more difficult ones--more details on those if you want, just ask. It's all plugging in equations to mathematical software and letting the computer do the work for you from there. So sit back, relax, grab a beer, a spliff (maybe), a pencil (no pen!), and use the above equations to figure out if you really know what you're talking about. For further reference, see Theoretical Mechanics of Particles and Continua by Fetter and Walecka. Some good post-ride yazoo. Peace, and God Bless.

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